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The addition of a cocktail of yeast species to Cantalet cheese changes bacterial survival and enhances aroma compound formation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154035
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Jan 31;129(1):37-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-31-2009
Author
Isabelle De Freitas
Nicolas Pinon
Jean-Louis Maubois
Sylvie Lortal
Anne Thierry
Author Affiliation
Les Fromageries Occitanes, Villefranche de Lauragais, France.
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2009 Jan 31;129(1):37-42
Date
Jan-31-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acids - analysis
Cheese - microbiology
Colony Count, Microbial
Food Microbiology
France
Humans
Kluyveromyces - growth & development - physiology
Lipolysis
Odors - analysis
Pichia - growth & development - physiology
Volatilization
Yarrowia - growth & development - physiology
Abstract
Indigenous yeasts can be detected at high populations in raw milk Cantal cheese, a French Protected Denomination of Origin (PDO) hard cheese. To investigate their use as adjunct cultures to promote flavour development in Cantalet (small Cantal) cheese, three strains isolated from raw milk Cantal cheese, Kluyveromyces lactis, Yarrowia lipolytica, and Pichia fermentans were added at 3 (E3) and 5 (E5) log(10) colony-forming units (cfu)/mL to microfiltered milk at a ratio of 80/10/10 viable cells, respectively. The global microbial, compositional and biochemical changes induced by the presence of yeasts in cheese were determined. Adjunct yeasts did not grow but stayed at viable populations of approximately 4 and 6 log(10) cfu/g in E3 and E5 cheeses, respectively, throughout the ripening period. They were mainly constituted of K. lactis, while P. fermentans and Y. lipolytica were not detectable after 3 and 45 days of ripening, respectively. Several species of indigenous yeasts were also detected in E3 cheeses at the beginning of ripening only, and in the control cheeses without yeasts added. Lactoccoci survived for longer periods in the presence of yeast adjuncts, while, conversely, the viability of Streptococcus thermophilus decreased more rapidly. The addition of yeasts did not influence cheese composition and total free amino acid content. In contrast, it slightly increased lipolysis in both E3 and E5 cheeses and markedly enhanced the formation of some volatile aroma compounds. The concentrations of ethanol, ethyl esters and some branched-chain alcohols were 6 to 10 fold higher in E5 cheeses than in the control cheeses, and only slightly higher in E3 cheeses. This study shows that K. lactis has a potential as cheese adjunct culture in Cantalet cheese and that, added at populations of 4-5 log(10) cfu/g cheese, it enhances the formation of flavour compounds.
PubMed ID
19036465 View in PubMed
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Adverse health reactions in skin, eyes, and respiratory tract among dental personnel in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15729
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
1998
Author
E C Lönnroth
H. Shahnavaz
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Work Sciences, Luleå Technical University, Sweden.
Source
Swed Dent J. 1998;22(1-2):33-45
Date
1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Asthma - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Conjunctivitis - epidemiology
Dental Auxiliaries - statistics & numerical data
Dental Materials - adverse effects
Dentists - statistics & numerical data
Dermatitis, Atopic - epidemiology
Dermatitis, Occupational - epidemiology
Eczema - epidemiology
Eye Diseases - epidemiology
Eye Protective Devices
Female
Gloves, Surgical - adverse effects
Hand Dermatoses - epidemiology
Humans
Latex
Male
Masks
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology
Permeability
Polymers - adverse effects - chemistry
Prevalence
Resins, Synthetic - adverse effects
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Rhinitis - epidemiology
Rhinitis, Allergic, Seasonal - epidemiology
Skin Diseases - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vinyl Compounds
Volatilization
Abstract
Dental personnel manually handle products that contain monomers. Several studies have documented adverse health effects after exposure to such products. Gloves made of vinyl or latex are easily penetrated by monomers. Ordinary glasses, or visors, do not protect against vapour from polymer products. Dental face masks filter out about 40% of respirable particles. To survey the prevalence of asthma, atopic dermatitis, conjunctivitis, hay fever/rhinitis, and hand eczema among dental personnel, a questionnaire was distributed to all dental teams in Northern Sweden. Referents were researchers, teachers, and secretaries from the same geographical area. The response rate was 76% for dental teams, and 66% for referents. The results show a significantly higher prevalence of conjunctivitis, and atopic dermatitis among dentists, both male and female. Hypersensitivity to dental materials was reported by significantly more dental personnel than by referents.
PubMed ID
9646391 View in PubMed
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Airborne molds and bacteria, microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOC), plasticizers and formaldehyde in dwellings in three North European cities in relation to sick building syndrome (SBS).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117626
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2013 Feb 1;444:433-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2013
Author
Bo Sahlberg
Maria Gunnbjörnsdottir
Argo Soon
Rain Jogi
Thorarinn Gislason
Gunilla Wieslander
Christer Janson
Dan Norback
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Sciences, Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. bo.sahlberg@medsci.uu.se
Source
Sci Total Environ. 2013 Feb 1;444:433-40
Date
Feb-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Air Microbiology
Air Pollution, Indoor - adverse effects - analysis
Cities
Estonia
Female
Formaldehyde - analysis - toxicity
Fungi
Furans - analysis - toxicity
Glycols - analysis
Humans
Iceland
Male
Methyl n-Butyl Ketone - analysis - toxicity
Octanols - analysis - toxicity
Plasticizers - toxicity
Sick Building Syndrome - chemically induced - epidemiology - etiology
Sweden
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Young Adult
Abstract
There are few studies on associations between airborne microbial exposure, formaldehyde, plasticizers in dwellings and the symptoms compatible with the sick building syndrome (SBS). As a follow-up of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS II), indoor measurements were performed in homes in three North European cities. The aim was to examine whether volatile organic compounds of possible microbial origin (MVOCs), and airborne levels of bacteria, molds, formaldehyde, and two plasticizers in dwellings were associated with the prevalence of SBS, and to study associations between MVOCs and reports on dampness and mold. The study included homes from three centers included in ECRHS II. A total of 159 adults (57% females) participated (19% from Reykjavik, 40% from Uppsala, and 41% from Tartu). A random sample and additional homes with a history of dampness were included. Exposure measurements were performed in the 159 homes of the participants. MVOCs were analyzed by GCMS with selective ion monitoring (SIM). Symptoms were reported in a standardized questionnaire. Associations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. In total 30.8% reported any SBS (20% mucosal, 10% general, and 8% dermal symptoms) and 41% of the homes had a history of dampness and molds There were positive associations between any SBS and levels of 2-pentanol (P=0.002), 2-hexanone (P=0.0002), 2-pentylfuran (P=0.009), 1-octen-3-ol (P=0.002), formaldehyde (P=0.05), and 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3-pentanediol monoisobutyrate (Texanol) (P=0.05). 1-octen-3-ol (P=0.009) and 3-methylfuran (P=0.002) were associated with mucosal symptoms. In dwellings with dampness and molds, the levels of total bacteria (P=0.02), total mold (P=0.04), viable mold (P=0.02), 3-methylfuran (P=0.008) and ethyl-isobutyrate (P=0.02) were higher. In conclusion, some MVOCs like 1-octen-3-ol, formaldehyde and the plasticizer Texanol, may be a risk factor for sick building syndrome. Moreover, concentrations of airborne molds, bacteria and some other MVOCs were slightly higher in homes with reported dampness and mold.
PubMed ID
23280302 View in PubMed
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Air contaminants in a submarine equipped with air independent propulsion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166824
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Nov;8(11):1111-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Ola Persson
Christina Ostberg
Joakim Pagels
Aleksandra Sebastian
Author Affiliation
Division of Heat Transfer, Department of Heat and Power Engineering, Lund Institute of Technology, Box 118, 221 00, Lund, Sweden.
Source
J Environ Monit. 2006 Nov;8(11):1111-21
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis - standards
Carbon Dioxide - analysis - standards
Ecological Systems, Closed
Environmental Monitoring - standards
Gram-Negative Bacteria - isolation & purification
Humans
Hydrogen - analysis - standards
Life Support Systems
Organic Chemicals - analysis - standards
Oxygen - analysis - standards
Ozone - analysis - standards
Pressure
Submarine Medicine
Sweden
Temperature
Volatilization
Abstract
The Swedish Navy has operated submarines equipped with air independent propulsion for two decades. This type of submarine can stay submerged for periods far longer than other non-nuclear submarines are capable of. The air quality during longer periods of submersion has so far not been thoroughly investigated. This study presents results for a number of air quality parameters obtained during more than one week of continuous submerged operation. The measured parameters are pressure, temperature, relative humidity, oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, particulate matter and microbiological contaminants. The measurements of airborne particles demonstrate that air pollutants typically occur at a low baseline level due to high air exchange rates and efficient air-cleaning devices. However, short-lived peaks with comparatively high concentrations occur, several of the sources for these have been identified. The concentrations of the pollutants measured in this study do not indicate a build-up of hazardous compounds during eight days of submersion. It is reasonable to assume that a substantial build-up of the investigated contaminants is not likely if the submersion period is prolonged several times, which is the case for modern submarines equipped with air independent propulsion.
PubMed ID
17075617 View in PubMed
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Air pollution and general practitioner access and utilization: a population based study in Sarnia, 'Chemical Valley,' Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132343
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Tor H Oiamo
Isaac N Luginaah
Dominic O Atari
Kevin M Gorey
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada. thoiamo@uwo.ca
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:71
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Environmental monitoring
Female
General Practitioners - utilization
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis - toxicity
Male
Middle Aged
Nitrogen Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Ontario
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Socioeconomic Factors
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis - toxicity
Urban Health Services - utilization
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis - toxicity
Young Adult
Abstract
Health impacts of poor environmental quality have been identified in studies around the world and in Canada. While many of the studies have identified associations between air pollution and mortality or morbidity, few have focused on the role of health care as a potential moderator of impacts. This study assessed the determinants of health care access and utilization in the context of ambient air pollution in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada.
Residents of Sarnia participated in a Community Health Study administered by phone, while several ambient air pollutants including nitrogen dioxide (NO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and the volatile organic compounds benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, mp- and o-xylene (BTEX) were monitored across the city. Land Use Regression models were used to estimate individual exposures to the measured pollutants and logistic regression models were utilized to assess the relative influence of environmental, socioeconomic and health related covariates on general practitioner access and utilization outcomes.
The results show that general practitioner use increased with levels of exposure to nitrogen dioxide (NO2- Odds Ratio [OR]: 1.16, p 0.05).
This study provides evidence for inequitable health care access and utilization in Sarnia, with particular relevance to its situation as a sentinel high exposure environment. Levels of exposure to pollution appears to influence utilization of health care services, but poor access to primary health care services additionally burden certain groups in Sarnia, Ontario, Canada.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21827645 View in PubMed
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Air toxics exposure from vehicle emissions at a U.S. border crossing: Buffalo Peace Bridge Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature131350
Source
Res Rep Health Eff Inst. 2011 Jul;(158):5-132
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
John Spengler
Jamson Lwebuga-Mukasa
Jose Vallarino
Steve Melly
Steve Chillrud
Joel Baker
Taeko Minegishi
Author Affiliation
Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA.
Source
Res Rep Health Eff Inst. 2011 Jul;(158):5-132
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - analysis
Canada
Environmental Exposure - analysis
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Particulate Matter - analysis
Polycyclic Hydrocarbons, Aromatic - analysis
United States
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Abstract
The Peace Bridge in Buffalo, New York, which spans the Niagara River at the east end of Lake Erie, is one of the busiest U.S. border crossings. The Peace Bridge plaza on the U.S. side is a complex of roads, customs inspection areas, passport control areas, and duty-free shops. On average 5000 heavy-duty diesel trucks and 20,000 passenger cars traverse the border daily, making the plaza area a potential "hot spot" for emissions from mobile sources. In a series of winter and summer field campaigns, we measured air pollutants, including many compounds considered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA*) as mobile-source air toxics (MSATs), at three fixed sampling sites: on the shore of Lake Erie, approximately 500 m upwind (under predominant wind conditions) of the Peace Bridge plaza; immediately downwind of (adjacent to) the plaza; and 500 m farther downwind, into the community of west Buffalo. Pollutants sampled were particulate matter (PM)
PubMed ID
21913504 View in PubMed
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Air-water exchange of brominated anisoles in the northern Baltic Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260092
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Jun 3;48(11):6124-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-3-2014
Author
Terry F Bidleman
Kathleen Agosta
Agneta Andersson
Peter Haglund
Olle Nygren
Matyas Ripszam
Mats Tysklind
Source
Environ Sci Technol. 2014 Jun 3;48(11):6124-32
Date
Jun-3-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Movements
Air Pollutants - analysis - chemistry
Anisoles - analysis - chemistry
Bromine - analysis - chemistry
Environmental monitoring
Oceans and Seas
Salinity
Seawater - analysis - chemistry
Sweden
Volatilization
Water Movements
Water Pollutants, Chemical - analysis - chemistry
Abstract
Bromophenols produced by marine algae undergo O-methylation to form bromoanisoles (BAs), which are exchanged between water and air. BAs were determined in surface water of the northern Baltic Sea (Gulf of Bothnia, consisting of Bothnian Bay and Bothnian Sea) during 2011-2013 and on a transect of the entire Baltic in September 2013. The abundance decreased in the following order: 2,4,6-tribromoanisole (2,4,6-TBA)>2,4-dibromoanisole (2,4-DBA)»2,6-dibromoanisole (2,6-DBA). Concentrations of 2,4-DBA and 2,4,6-TBA in September were higher in the southern than in the northern Baltic and correlated well with the higher salinity in the south. This suggests south-to-north advection and dilution with fresh riverine water enroute, and/or lower production in the north. The abundance in air over the northern Baltic also decreased in the following order: 2,4,6-TBA>2,4-DBA. However, 2,6-DBA was estimated as a lower limit due to breakthrough from polyurethane foam traps used for sampling. Water/air fugacity ratios ranged from 3.4 to 7.6 for 2,4-DBA and from 18 to 94 for 2,4,6-TBA, indicating net volatilization. Flux estimates using the two-film model suggested that volatilization removes 980-1360 kg of total BAs from Bothnian Bay (38000 km2) between May and September. The release of bromine from outgassing of BAs could be up to 4-6% of bromine fluxes from previously reported volatilization of bromomethanes and bromochloromethanes.
PubMed ID
24811233 View in PubMed
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Ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in communities of the Athabasca oil sands region: Sources and screening health risk assessment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292075
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Apr; 235:602-614
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2018
Author
Md Aynul Bari
Warren B Kindzierski
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health, University of Alberta, 3-57 South Academic Building, 11405-87 Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 1C9 Canada. Electronic address: mdaynul@ualberta.ca.
Source
Environ Pollut. 2018 Apr; 235:602-614
Date
Apr-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Alberta
Environmental Exposure - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Environmental monitoring
Humans
Oil and Gas Fields
Risk assessment
Volatile Organic Compounds - analysis
Xylenes
Abstract
An investigation of ambient levels and sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and associated public health risks was carried out at two northern Alberta oil sands communities (Fort McKay and Fort McMurray located?30?km from oil sands development, respectively) for the period January 2010-March 2015. Levels of total detected VOCs were comparatively similar at both communities (Fort McKay: geometric mean?=?22.8?µg/m3, interquartile range, IQR?=?13.8-41?µg/m3); (Fort McMurray: geometric mean?=?23.3?µg/m3, IQR?=?12.0-41?µg/m3). In general, methanol (24%-50%), alkanes (26%-32%) and acetaldehyde (23%-30%) were the predominant VOCs followed by acetone (20%-24%) and aromatics (~9%). Mean and maximum ambient concentrations of selected hazardous VOCs were compared to health risk screening criteria used by United States regulatory agencies. The Positive matrix factorization (PMF) model was used to identify and apportion VOC sources at Fort McKay and Fort McMurray. Five sources were identified at Fort McKay, where four sources (oil sands fugitives, liquid/unburned fuel, ethylbenzene/xylene-rich and petroleum processing) were oil sands related emissions and contributed to 70% of total VOCs. At Fort McMurray six sources were identified, where local sources other than oil sands development were also observed. Contribution of aged air mass/regional transport including biomass burning emissions was ~30% of total VOCs at both communities. Source-specific carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risk values were also calculated and were below acceptable and safe levels of risk, except for aged air mass/regional transport (at both communities), and ethylbenzene/xylene-rich (only at Fort McMurray).
PubMed ID
29331893 View in PubMed
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Amplification of plant volatile defence against insect herbivory in a warming Arctic tundra.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature302856
Source
Nat Plants. 2019 06; 5(6):568-574
Publication Type
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
06-2019
Author
Tao Li
Thomas Holst
Anders Michelsen
Riikka Rinnan
Author Affiliation
Terrestrial Ecology Section, Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. tao.li@bio.ku.dk.
Source
Nat Plants. 2019 06; 5(6):568-574
Date
06-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Letter
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Animals
Betula - immunology - parasitology
Ecosystem
Global warming
Herbivory
Insecta - physiology
Tundra
Volatile Organic Compounds - metabolism
Abstract
Plant-emitted volatile organic compounds (VOCs) play fundamental roles in atmospheric chemistry and ecological processes by contributing to aerosol formation1 and mediating species interactions2. Rising temperatures and the associated shifts in vegetation composition have been shown to be the primary drivers of plant VOC emissions in Arctic ecosystems3. Although herbivorous insects also strongly alter plant VOC emissions2, no studies have addressed the impact of herbivory on plant VOC emissions in the Arctic. Here we show that warming dramatically increases the amount, and alters the blend, of VOCs released in response to herbivory. We observed that a tundra ecosystem subjected to warming, by open-top chambers, for 8 or 18 years showed a fourfold increase in leaf area eaten by insect herbivores. Herbivory by autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) larvae, and herbivory-mimicking methyl jasmonate application, on the widespread circumpolar dwarf birch (Betula nana) both substantially increased emissions of terpenoids. The long-term warming treatments and mimicked herbivory caused, on average, a two- and fourfold increase in monoterpene emissions, respectively. When combined, emissions increased 11-fold, revealing a strong synergy between warming and herbivory. The synergistic effect was even more pronounced for homoterpene emissions. These findings suggest that, in the rapidly warming Arctic, insect herbivory may be a primary determinant of VOC emissions during periods of active herbivore feeding.
PubMed ID
31182843 View in PubMed
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175 records – page 1 of 18.