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43 records – page 1 of 5.

Adapting work sites for disabled persons using advanced technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216378
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1995;11(2):235-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
1995
Author
T. Malmsborg
Author Affiliation
TeleNova, Stockholm.
Source
Int J Technol Assess Health Care. 1995;11(2):235-44
Date
1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Computer Systems
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation
Employment, Supported
Holistic Health
Humans
Models, organizational
Patient care team
Rehabilitation, Vocational - instrumentation - methods
Self-Help Devices
Sweden
Vocational Guidance
Workplace
Abstract
This paper describes the technical approach in the TUFFA (Technology Procurement for Disabled in Working Life) project and a model for cooperating areas of competence based on a holistic view of the individual's abilities, the environmental conditions at the work site, and technical solutions.
PubMed ID
7790167 View in PubMed
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Adults with congenital limb deficiency in Norway: demographic and clinical features, pain and the use of health care and welfare services. A cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274507
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(22):2076-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Heidi Johansen
Kristin Østlie
Liv Øinæs Andersen
Svend Rand-Hendriksen
Source
Disabil Rehabil. 2015;37(22):2076-82
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Adult
Aged
Chronic Pain - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Delivery of Health Care - utilization
Disabled Persons - rehabilitation - statistics & numerical data
Employment
Female
Humans
Limb Deformities, Congenital - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pain Measurement
Self-Help Devices - utilization
Social Welfare
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vocational Guidance
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe an adult population with congenital limb deficiency (CLD) recruited through the National Resource Centre for Rare Disorders (TRS) in Norway: (1) demographic factors, (2) clinical features, (3) pain and (4) use of health care and welfare services.
Cross-sectional study. In 2012, a postal questionnaire was sent to 186 eligible persons with CLD, age 20 years and older.
Ninety-seven respondents, median-age 39 years (range: 20-82); 71% were women. The population was divided into two subgroups: (1) unilateral upper-limb deficiency (UULD) n = 77, (2) multiple and/or lower-limb deficiency (MLD/LLD). About 40% worked full-time, 18% received disability pensions and 64% reported chronic pain, mostly bilateral pain. Grip-improving devices were used more often than prostheses; 23% were previous prosthesis users. Use of health care and welfare services are described. No significant differences were found between the subgroups regarding pain or employment status.
Persons with CLD reported increased prevalence of chronic pain, mostly bilateral, and increased prevalence of early retirement. A greater focus on the benefits of the use of assistive devices, the consequences of overuse and vocational guidance may moderate pain and prevent early retirement. Further studies of more representative samples should be conducted to confirm our findings.
Most adults with congenital limb deficiency (CLD) live ordinary lives and experience normal life events. However, several report chronic pain and retire before normal retirement age. In spite of free and accessible prosthetic services, a large fraction chooses not to use prosthesis, more use grip-improving devices for specific activities. These preferences should be acknowledged by rehabilitation specialists. Focus on individually adapted environments, more information about the consequences of overuse, and vocational guidance may moderate pain and prevent early retirement.
PubMed ID
25583386 View in PubMed
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Source
Anchorage, AK. 37 p.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
Date
1983
  1 document  
Author
Alaska Native Health Career Program
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska, Rural Education
Source
Anchorage, AK. 37 p.
Date
1983
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Book/Book Chapter
File Size
15865678
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Minorities in medicine -- Scholarships, fellowships, etc. -- Alaska
Health occupations schools -- United States
Medicine -- Vocational guidance -- Alaska
Public health -- Vocational guidance -- Alaska
Nursing -- Vocational guidance -- Alaska
allied health personnel -- Vocational guidance -- Alaska
Notes
ALASKA R693.A42 1983
Documents
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An evaluation of a community-based vocational rehabilitation program for adults with psychiatric disabilities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198336
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1999;18(1):165-79
Publication Type
Article
Date
1999
Author
M. Bozzer
D. Samsom
J. Anson
Author Affiliation
Gastown Vocational Services, Greater Vancouver Mental Health Service Society.
Source
Can J Commun Ment Health. 1999;18(1):165-79
Date
1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Chronic Disease
Community Mental Health Services
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - rehabilitation
Program Evaluation
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Vocational Education
Vocational Guidance
Abstract
The purpose of this research is to examine the effectiveness of a project aimed at the vocational rehabilitation of individuals suffering from chronic psychiatric disabilities. Gastown Vocational Services (GVS) is a specialized vocational rehabilitation program, under the auspices of Greater Vancouver Mental Health Service Society. The project consisted of three distinct phases and utilized a gradual, step-by-step rehabilitative approach to achieve vocational success. The first phase of the GVS project included comprehensive vocational assessment and work-readiness skill training. Participants in this phase met in small groups for three hours, three times a week for a 12-week period. The second phase involved supported work-experience placements in the community. These placements were two to five months in duration. The final phase included assistance in seeking employment, job re-training, or educational programs. Assessment measures were taken before participants began the program, immediately after the 12-week job preparation program, and at six-month follow-up. Seventy-three individuals participated in the training program over a two-year period. Their progress was compared to 18 individuals comprising a Waiting List Control group. The results showed significant improvement in the Intervention group on measures of assertiveness, work behaviour, depression, income, and employment status. No changes were evident in the Waiting List Control group.
PubMed ID
10847981 View in PubMed
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Background factors related to and/or influencing occupation in mentally disordered offenders.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81011
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Sep;20(3):331-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2006
Author
Lindstedt Helena
Ivarsson Ann-Britt
Söderlund Anne
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Caring Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. helena.lindstedt@pubcare.uu.se
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2006 Sep;20(3):331-8
Date
Sep-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Attitude to Health
Crime - psychology
Criminal Psychology
Forensic Psychiatry
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Inpatients - education - psychology
Logistic Models
Male
Mental Disorders - psychology
Middle Aged
Nursing Methodology Research
Occupations
Patient Discharge
Prisoners - education - psychology
Quality of Life - psychology
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Efficacy
Sweden
Violence - psychology
Vocational Guidance
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Knowledge of background and occupational related factors of mentally disordered offenders are missing. It is essential to understand these issues when planning discharge from forensic psychiatric hospital care to enable community dwelling. AIMS: One aim was to investigate mentally disordered offenders' background factors, confidence in and how they value occupations. Another aim was to investigate MDOs background factors' in relation to and the influences on Occupational Performance and Social Participation. METHOD: Data was collected with an explorative, correlative design after informed consent, from 74 mentally disordered offenders (mean age 34,2) cared for in forensic psychiatric hospitals. Assessments were Allen Cognitive Level Screen, Capability to Perform Daily Occupations, Interview Schedule of Social Interaction, Manchester Short Assessment of Quality of Life, Self-efficacy Scale and Importance scale. Eight background factors were assembled from the individual forensic psychiatric investigation. FINDINGS: Most of the investigated background factors relate to and half of them influence occupational performance, particular the cognitive aspect of occupational performance. The influences on occupation originate from adulthood, such as suffering from schizophrenia, psycho/social problems, and having performed violent crimes. These findings indicate that staff in forensic hospital care should initiate rehabilitation with knowledge about MDOs' complex daily occupations. For avoiding information bias, information gathering preceding treatment planning should be performed in collaboration between caring staff and mentally disordered offenders.
PubMed ID
16922988 View in PubMed
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Back to work: vocational issues and strategies for Canadians living with HIV/AIDS.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173113
Source
Work. 2005;25(2):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Fred McGinn
Jacqueline Gahagan
Elaine Gibson
Author Affiliation
Diploma in Disability Management, Dalhousie University, 6226 University Avenue, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 3J5. Fred.mcginn@dal.ca
Source
Work. 2005;25(2):163-71
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Employment - legislation & jurisprudence - psychology
Female
HIV Infections - psychology
Humans
Insurance, Disability - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Rehabilitation, Vocational
Vocational Guidance
Workplace
Abstract
Much has been written since the first appearance of HIV/AIDS in 1981 about its effects on the Canadian health care and social services systems. However, researchers have given limited attention to issues of entry or re-entry to the competitive job market for HIV positive individuals. The emergence of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) has allowed a significant number of persons who are HIV positive to experience a major recovery in health and energy. This increase in physical health has in turn led to a re-examination of the possibility of returning to former types and levels of activity, including the prospect of going back to work or entering the competitive workforce for the first time. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the issues and concerns that impact HIV positive individuals' attempts to return to or enter the competitive workforce, particularly those relating to disability policies and public insurance. Data from in-depth interviews with a sample of people living with HIV/AIDS (PHAs) are used to help illustrate the disconnect between these policies and the lived experiences of PHAs. Also discussed are the opportunities for Canadian policies and practices to employ a functional definition of disability and a philosophy of early intervention in vocational rehabilitation.
PubMed ID
16131746 View in PubMed
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Effective group training techniques in job-search training.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature173545
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2005 Jul;10(3):261-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2005
Author
Jukka Vuori
Richard H Price
Pertti Mutanen
Ira Malmberg-Heimonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland. jukka.vuori@ttl.fi
Source
J Occup Health Psychol. 2005 Jul;10(3):261-75
Date
Jul-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Depression - etiology - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Humans
Job Application
Male
Mental health
Middle Aged
Psychotherapy, Group
Risk factors
Stress, Psychological
Unemployment
Vocational Guidance
Abstract
The aim was to examine the effects of group training techniques in job-search training on later reemployment and mental health. The participants were 278 unemployed workers in Finland in 71 job-search training groups. Five group-level dimensions of training were identified. The results of hierarchical linear modeling demonstrated that preparation for setbacks at the group level significantly predicted decreased psychological distress and decreased symptoms of depression at the half-year follow-up. Trainer skills at the group level significantly predicted decreased symptoms of depression and reemployment to stable jobs. Interaction analyses showed that preparation for setbacks at the group level predicted fewer symptoms of psychological distress and depression, and shared perceptions of skilled trainers at the group level predicted fewer symptoms of depression among those who had been at risk for depression.
PubMed ID
16060729 View in PubMed
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Elderly people's use of the social assistance act, with special reference to advice and guidance, inter alia, as an element in preventing the need for nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243398
Source
Dan Med Bull. 1982 Mar;29(3):121-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1982

43 records – page 1 of 5.