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Applicability of the International Classification of Nursing Practice (ICNP) in the areas of nutrition and skin care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61619
Source
Int J Nurs Terminol Classif. 2003 Jan-Mar;14(1):5-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
Margareta Ehnfors
Jan Florin
Anna Ehrenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Caring Sciences, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. margareta.ehnfors@ivo.oru.se
Source
Int J Nurs Terminol Classif. 2003 Jan-Mar;14(1):5-18
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Communicable Diseases - complications - nursing
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Nursing Diagnosis - classification - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nutrition
Patient Care Planning - classification - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Care - nursing
Sweden
Translating
Vocabulary, Controlled
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate completeness, granularity, multiple axial content, and clinical utility of the beta version of the ICNP in the context of standardized nursing care planning in a clinical setting. METHODS: An 35-bed acute care ward for infectious diseases at a Swedish university hospital was selected for clinical testing. A convenience sample of 56 patient records with data on nutrition and skin care was analyzed and mapped to the ICNP. FINDINGS: Using the ICNP terminology, 59%-62% of the record content describing nursing phenomena and 30%-44% of the nursing interventions in the areas of nutrition and skin care could be expressed satisfactorily. For about a quarter of the content describing nursing phenomena and interventions, no corresponding ICNP term was found. CONCLUSIONS: The ICNP needs to be further developed to allow representation of the entire range of nursing care. Terms need to be developed to express patient participation and preferences, normal conditions, qualitative dimensions and characteristics, nonhuman focus, and duration. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The practical usefulness of the ICNP needs further testing before conclusions about its clinical benefits can be determined.
PubMed ID
12747302 View in PubMed
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Applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification to describe nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174926
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):128-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Asta Thoroddsen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. astat@hi.is
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):128-39
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Iceland
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Informatics
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Process - classification
Nursing Records
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Semantics
Sensitivity and specificity
Terminology as Topic
Translating
Vocabulary, Controlled
Abstract
The aim of this survey was to test the applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) system for use in a future nursing information system for documenting nursing in an electronic patient record in Iceland. Also, the aim was to test the translation of NIC into Icelandic. In order to be applicable to nursing NIC needs to be sensitive enough to describe the work nurses do, differentiate between specialities in nursing, and be understandable to nurses. A sample of 198 nurses was asked to identify how often they used each of 433 NIC nursing interventions. Of the 36 most frequently used interventions half are within the physiological domain. Core nursing interventions were different between specialities, e.g. Analgesic Administration had a high mean score in surgical nursing, and Health Education in primary health care. anova for the 27 classes in NIC showed significant differences (p
PubMed ID
15877638 View in PubMed
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C-HOBIC: standardized clinical outcomes to support evidence-informed nursing care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125574
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2012 Mar;25(1):43-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012

Clinical documentation standards--promise or peril?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158596
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2007;20(4):33-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Lynn M Nagle
Author Affiliation
Canada Health Infoway.
Source
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont). 2007;20(4):33-6
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Documentation - standards
Forms and Records Control - standards
Humans
Information Systems
Nursing Records - standards
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Vocabulary, Controlled
PubMed ID
18303722 View in PubMed
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Clinical relevance of access targets for elective dental treatment under general anesthesia in pediatrics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139597
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2010;76:a116
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Sonia S Chung
Michael J Casas
David J Kenny
Edward J Barrett
Author Affiliation
Department of Dentistry, The Hospital for Sick Children, 555 University Avenue, Toronto, ON M5G 1X8.
Source
J Can Dent Assoc. 2010;76:a116
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Anesthesia, Dental - methods
Anesthesia, General
Appointments and Schedules
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Dental Care for Children - organization & administration
Female
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Male
Ontario
Retrospective Studies
Statistics, nonparametric
Surgical Procedures, Elective
Triage
Vocabulary, Controlled
Abstract
To evaluate the clinical relevance of access targets for elective dental procedures performed under general anesthesia at The Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, Ontario, by assessing incremental changes in the burden of dental disease over wait times for such procedures.
Children scheduled for elective dental procedures under general anesthesia were assigned a priority according to the dental diagnosis and the medical risk status. Each priority level was defined by a specific diagnostic code and access target (maximum acceptable wait time). The dental records of children who underwent dental procedures with general anesthesia between June 2005 and December 2008 were assessed retrospectively. A novel assessment scale was used to measure the cumulative burden of dental disease during the waiting period.
A total of 378 children (age range 10 months to 17 years) met the inclusion criteria. Statistically significant correlations were identified between disease burden and wait times for priority group IV (access target 90 days) (p=0.004), for the entire sample (p
PubMed ID
21044423 View in PubMed
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The Contextualization of Archetypes: Clinical Template Governance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278581
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;218:40616
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Rune Pedersen
Gro-Hilde Ulriksen
Gunnar Ellingsen
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2015;218:40616
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Data Accuracy
Electronic Health Records - standards
Medical Record Linkage - standards
Norway
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Semantics
Vocabulary, Controlled
Abstract
This paper is a status report from a large-scale openEHR-based EPR project from the North Norway Regional Health Authority. It concerns the standardization of a regional ICT portfolio and the ongoing development of a new process oriented EPR systems encouraged by the unfolding of a national repository for openEHR archetypes. Subject of interest; the contextualization of clinical templates is governed over multiple national boundaries which is complex due to the dependency of clinical resources. From the outset of this, we are interested in how local, regional, and national organizers maneuver to standardize while applying OpenEHR technology.
PubMed ID
26262546 View in PubMed
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Controlled search term vocabularies for finding articles relevant to injury prevention and safety promotion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138087
Source
Inj Prev. 2011 Aug;17(4):260-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
David W Lawrence
Author Affiliation
Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of International Health (IHCAR), Injuries' Social Aetiology and Consequences Group, Stockholm, Sweden. david.lawrence@sdsu.edu
Source
Inj Prev. 2011 Aug;17(4):260-5
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abstracting and Indexing as Topic - standards
Canada
Databases, Bibliographic - standards
Great Britain
Humans
Information Storage and Retrieval
MEDLINE
Medical Subject Headings - utilization
Safety
Terminology as Topic
United States
Vocabulary, Controlled
Wounds and injuries - prevention & control
Abstract
To assess the usefulness of the controlled vocabularies of PubMed/MEDLINE and PsycINFO for finding articles on injury prevention and safety promotion (IPSP) topics and to identify specific indexing problems that can contribute to incomplete retrieval.
Professional reference librarians provided search strategies for finding articles relevant to five topics pertaining to the injury prevention field in the two bibliographic databases. The results of implementing these search strategies were compared with the results of a presumptive gold standard-serial textword searches on the same topics. The index terms assigned to the articles that were missed by the librarian strategies were examined.
The search products of the librarian-constructed search strategies identified 34-91% of the IPSP-relevant articles that were identified through serial textword searches of the two databases. Specific indexing issues were found to contribute to this loss.
Librarians bring expertise to searching, but irregular or incomplete indexing can limit the product of even well-constructed searches for articles on IPSP topics.
PubMed ID
21212442 View in PubMed
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Cue-based assertion classification for Swedish clinical text--developing a lexicon for pyConTextSwe.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261420
Source
Artif Intell Med. 2014 Jul;61(3):137-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
Sumithra Velupillai
Maria Skeppstedt
Maria Kvist
Danielle Mowery
Brian E Chapman
Hercules Dalianis
Wendy W Chapman
Source
Artif Intell Med. 2014 Jul;61(3):137-44
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Artificial Intelligence
Cues
Electronic Health Records
Humans
Language
Natural Language Processing
Semantics
Sweden
Translations
Uncertainty
Vocabulary, Controlled
Abstract
The ability of a cue-based system to accurately assert whether a disorder is affirmed, negated, or uncertain is dependent, in part, on its cue lexicon. In this paper, we continue our study of porting an assertion system (pyConTextNLP) from English to Swedish (pyConTextSwe) by creating an optimized assertion lexicon for clinical Swedish.
We integrated cues from four external lexicons, along with generated inflections and combinations. We used subsets of a clinical corpus in Swedish. We applied four assertion classes (definite existence, probable existence, probable negated existence and definite negated existence) and two binary classes (existence yes/no and uncertainty yes/no) to pyConTextSwe. We compared pyConTextSwe's performance with and without the added cues on a development set, and improved the lexicon further after an error analysis. On a separate evaluation set, we calculated the system's final performance.
Following integration steps, we added 454 cues to pyConTextSwe. The optimized lexicon developed after an error analysis resulted in statistically significant improvements on the development set (83% F-score, overall). The system's final F-scores on an evaluation set were 81% (overall). For the individual assertion classes, F-score results were 88% (definite existence), 81% (probable existence), 55% (probable negated existence), and 63% (definite negated existence). For the binary classifications existence yes/no and uncertainty yes/no, final system performance was 97%/87% and 78%/86% F-score, respectively.
We have successfully ported pyConTextNLP to Swedish (pyConTextSwe). We have created an extensive and useful assertion lexicon for Swedish clinical text, which could form a valuable resource for similar studies, and which is publicly available.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24556644 View in PubMed
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Describing the sublanguage of wound care in an adult ICU.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121838
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2012;180:1093-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Riitta Danielsson-Ojala
Heljä Lundgren-Laine
Sanna Salanterä
Author Affiliation
The University of Turku, Department of Nursing Science, Turku, Finland.
Source
Stud Health Technol Inform. 2012;180:1093-5
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Data Mining
Documentation - methods
Finland
Humans
Intensive Care - statistics & numerical data
Intensive Care Units
Nursing Records - classification
Vocabulary, Controlled
Wounds and Injuries - classification - therapy
Abstract
Comprehensive wound documentation is an important tool in evaluating and planning patient care. The sublanguage used in ICUs may affect negatively to the wound care and thus to the healing process. We made a quantitative content analysis of nursing documentation of cardiac surgery adult patients (n=60) who had stayed over four days in the ICU. The sublanguage used in nursing documentation of wounds and ulcers in the ICU was unstructured with many words of colloquial language, misspellings and abbreviations. The documentation did not cover all aspects of proper wound care. The information technology could be helpful for nurses to document right things with plain language.
PubMed ID
22874364 View in PubMed
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47 records – page 1 of 5.