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The adaptation of an adult group screening test for dyslexia into Finland-Swedish: normative data for university students and the effects of language background on test performance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature84750
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Lindgrén Signe-Anita
Laine Matti
Author Affiliation
Abo Akademi University, Turku, Finland. signe-anita.lindgren@abo.fi
Source
Scand J Psychol. 2007 Oct;48(5):419-32
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Awareness
Cultural Characteristics
Dyslexia - diagnosis
Female
Finland
Health Surveys
Humans
Language
Male
Mass Screening - methods - statistics & numerical data
Memory
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Phonetics
ROC Curve
Self Disclosure
Students - psychology
Sweden
Task Performance and Analysis
Vocabulary
Abstract
We present a Finland-Swedish adaptation of the Sweden-Swedish group screening test for dyslexia for adults and young adults DUVAN (Lundberg & Wolff, 2003) together with normative data from 143 Finland-Swedish university students. The test is based on the widely held phonological deficit hypothesis of dyslexia and consists of a self-report and five subtests tapping phonological working memory, phonological representation, phonological awareness, and orthographic skill. We describe the test adaptation procedure and show that the internal reliability of the new test version is comparable to the original one. Our results indicate that the language background (Swedish, Finnish, early simultaneous Swedish-Finnish bilingualism) should be taken into account when interpreting the results on the Finland-Swedish DUVAN test. We show that the FS-DUVAN differentiates a group of students with dyslexia diagnosis from normals, and that a low performance on the FS-DUVAN correlates with a positive self-report on familial dyslexia and with a history of special education in school. Finally, we analyze the sensitivity and specificity of the FS-DUVAN for dyslexia among university students.
PubMed ID
17877557 View in PubMed
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Adjective production by Russian-speaking children with specific language impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124869
Source
Clin Linguist Phon. 2012 Jun;26(6):554-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Elena Tribushinina
Elena Dubinkina
Author Affiliation
Department of Dutch Language and Culture, Utrecht Institute of Linguistics, Utrecht, The Netherlands. e.tribushinina@uu.nl
Source
Clin Linguist Phon. 2012 Jun;26(6):554-71
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child Language
Female
Humans
Language
Language Development
Language Development Disorders - physiopathology
Language Tests
Male
Phonetics
Russia
Semantics
Verbal Behavior
Vocabulary
Abstract
Research on specific language impairment (SLI) has primarily focused on the acquisition of nouns and verbs. Less attention has been given to other content-word classes, such as adjectives and adverbs. This article investigates adjective production by 7- to 10-year-old Russian-speaking children with SLI and their typically developing (TD) peers and focuses on the production of antonymous adjectives and degree markers in an elicitation experiment. The results show that degree morphology is more impaired in SLI than antonymy. In antonym production, children with SLI were able to catch up with their TD peers by age 8. In the domain of degree, however, the SLI group lagged behind the TD controls across all ages studied. Error analysis indicates that language-impaired children have particular difficulty with agreement inflection and affixal negations. They also substitute adjectives with specific meanings by more general terms. The implications of this study for the morphological-richness hypothesis are discussed.
PubMed ID
22540361 View in PubMed
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An analysis of reading and spelling abilities of children using AAC: Understanding a continuum of competence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature140456
Source
Augment Altern Commun. 2010 Sep;26(3):191-202
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Annika Dahlgren Sandberg
Martine Smith
Maria Larsson
Author Affiliation
University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source
Augment Altern Commun. 2010 Sep;26(3):191-202
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Achievement
Adolescent
Aptitude
Cerebral Palsy - rehabilitation
Child
Child, Preschool
Communication Aids for Disabled
Communication Disorders - rehabilitation
Comprehension
Education, Special
Female
Humans
Ireland
Language
Mainstreaming (Education)
Male
Memory, Short-Term
Phonetics
Reading
Retention (Psychology)
Sweden
Verbal Learning
Vocabulary
Abstract
The over-representation of reading and spelling difficulties in children with complex communication needs has been well documented. However, most of the studies reported have indicated that at least some children using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) can achieve and demonstrate effective literacy skills, highlighting the heterogeneity of this group. This paper presents findings from a cross-linguistic study of 14 Swedish and 14 Irish children with cerebral palsy who use AAC, outlining their performance on a range of phonological awareness, reading, and spelling tasks developed for the purposes of the study. All participants were referred to the study as functioning in the average range of intellectual ability. Of the 28 participants, eight were classified as good readers, on the basis of their success on tasks involving connected text; while 10 presented with single-word reading skills; and 10 were categorized as non-readers. This paper explores the similarities and differences within and across these groups, in terms of associated skills and experiences. While analyses of group data suggests some common abilities and difficulties, exploration of individual profiles highlights the heterogeneity of the participants' profiles, suggesting a need for detailed individual assessment and interventions.
PubMed ID
20874081 View in PubMed
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Applicability of the International Classification of Nursing Practice (ICNP) in the areas of nutrition and skin care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61619
Source
Int J Nurs Terminol Classif. 2003 Jan-Mar;14(1):5-18
Publication Type
Article
Author
Margareta Ehnfors
Jan Florin
Anna Ehrenberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Caring Sciences, Orebro University, Orebro, Sweden. margareta.ehnfors@ivo.oru.se
Source
Int J Nurs Terminol Classif. 2003 Jan-Mar;14(1):5-18
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Communicable Diseases - complications - nursing
Decision Making, Computer-Assisted
Humans
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Nursing Diagnosis - classification - standards
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nutrition
Patient Care Planning - classification - standards
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Skin Care - nursing
Sweden
Translating
Vocabulary, Controlled
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate completeness, granularity, multiple axial content, and clinical utility of the beta version of the ICNP in the context of standardized nursing care planning in a clinical setting. METHODS: An 35-bed acute care ward for infectious diseases at a Swedish university hospital was selected for clinical testing. A convenience sample of 56 patient records with data on nutrition and skin care was analyzed and mapped to the ICNP. FINDINGS: Using the ICNP terminology, 59%-62% of the record content describing nursing phenomena and 30%-44% of the nursing interventions in the areas of nutrition and skin care could be expressed satisfactorily. For about a quarter of the content describing nursing phenomena and interventions, no corresponding ICNP term was found. CONCLUSIONS: The ICNP needs to be further developed to allow representation of the entire range of nursing care. Terms need to be developed to express patient participation and preferences, normal conditions, qualitative dimensions and characteristics, nonhuman focus, and duration. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: The practical usefulness of the ICNP needs further testing before conclusions about its clinical benefits can be determined.
PubMed ID
12747302 View in PubMed
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Applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification to describe nursing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174926
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):128-39
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2005
Author
Asta Thoroddsen
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Nursing, University of Iceland and Landspitali University Hospital, Reykjavik, Iceland. astat@hi.is
Source
Scand J Caring Sci. 2005 Jun;19(2):128-39
Date
Jun-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Attitude of Health Personnel
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Iceland
Medical Records Systems, Computerized
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role
Nursing Evaluation Research
Nursing Informatics
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Process - classification
Nursing Records
Nursing Staff - education - psychology
Questionnaires
Semantics
Sensitivity and specificity
Terminology as Topic
Translating
Vocabulary, Controlled
Abstract
The aim of this survey was to test the applicability of the Nursing Interventions Classification (NIC) system for use in a future nursing information system for documenting nursing in an electronic patient record in Iceland. Also, the aim was to test the translation of NIC into Icelandic. In order to be applicable to nursing NIC needs to be sensitive enough to describe the work nurses do, differentiate between specialities in nursing, and be understandable to nurses. A sample of 198 nurses was asked to identify how often they used each of 433 NIC nursing interventions. Of the 36 most frequently used interventions half are within the physiological domain. Core nursing interventions were different between specialities, e.g. Analgesic Administration had a high mean score in surgical nursing, and Health Education in primary health care. anova for the 27 classes in NIC showed significant differences (p
PubMed ID
15877638 View in PubMed
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Associations between lexicon and grammar at the end of the second year in Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature154325
Source
J Child Lang. 2009 Sep;36(4):779-806
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2009
Author
Suvi Stolt
Leena Haataja
Helena Lapinleimu
Liisa Lehtonen
Author Affiliation
University of Helsinki and Turku University Central Hospital, Finland. suvi.stolt@utu.fi
Source
J Child Lang. 2009 Sep;36(4):779-806
Date
Sep-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Humans
Language Tests
Linguistics
Male
Speech
Vocabulary
Abstract
ABSTRACTThe emergence of grammar in relation to lexical growth was analyzed in a sample of Finnish children (N=181) at 2 ; 0. The Finnish version of the Communicative Development Inventory was used to gather information on both language domains. The onset of grammar occurred in close association with vocabulary growth. The acquisition of the nominal and verbal inflections of Finnish differed when analyzed in relation to the lexicon in which they are used: the strongest growth in the acquisition of case form types occurred when the nominal lexicon size was roughly between 50 and 250 words, whereas verb inflectional types were acquired actively from the beginning of the verb lexicon acquisition. The findings extend the previous findings of the close association between lexicon and grammar (e.g. Bates & Goodman, 1999). The results suggest that different grammatical structures display different degrees and types of lexical dependency.
PubMed ID
19000335 View in PubMed
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Bilingual effects on cognitive and linguistic development: role of language, cultural background, and education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127230
Source
Child Dev. 2012 Mar-Apr;83(2):413-22
Publication Type
Article
Author
Raluca Barac
Ellen Bialystok
Author Affiliation
York University, Toronto, ON, Canada.
Source
Child Dev. 2012 Mar-Apr;83(2):413-22
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention
Child
Color Perception
Cross-Cultural Comparison
Discrimination (Psychology)
Educational Status
Executive Function
Female
Humans
Language Development
Male
Multilingualism
Neuropsychological Tests - statistics & numerical data
Ontario
Pattern Recognition, Visual
Psychometrics
Psychomotor Performance
Reaction Time
Reversal Learning
Verbal Learning
Vocabulary
Abstract
A total of 104 six-year-old children belonging to 4 groups (English monolinguals, Chinese-English bilinguals, French-English bilinguals, Spanish-English bilinguals) were compared on 3 verbal tasks and 1 nonverbal executive control task to examine the generality of the bilingual effects on development. Bilingual groups differed in degree of similarity between languages, cultural background, and language of schooling. On the executive control task, all bilingual groups performed similarly and exceeded monolinguals; on the language tasks the best performance was achieved by bilingual children whose language of instruction was the same as the language of testing and whose languages had more overlap. Thus, executive control outcomes for bilingual children are general but performance on verbal tasks is specific to factors in the bilingual experience.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22313034 View in PubMed
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Brief report: An exploratory study of lexical skills in bilingual children with autism spectrum disorder.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130989
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2012 Jul;42(7):1499-503
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Jill M Petersen
Stefka H Marinova-Todd
Pat Mirenda
Author Affiliation
School of Audiology and Speech Sciences, University of British Columbia, 2177 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3, Canada.
Source
J Autism Dev Disord. 2012 Jul;42(7):1499-503
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Child
Child Development Disorders, Pervasive - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child, Preschool
China - ethnology
Comorbidity
Comprehension
Cross-Sectional Studies
Emigrants and Immigrants
Female
Humans
Language Development Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology
Language Tests
Male
Multilingualism
Vocabulary
Abstract
Studying lexical diversity in bilingual children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) can contribute important information to our understanding of language development in this diverse population. In this exploratory study, lexical comprehension and production and overall language skills were investigated in 14 English-Chinese bilingual and 14 English monolingual preschool-age children with ASD. Results indicated that both groups had equivalent scores on all but one measure of language and vocabulary, including English production vocabulary, conceptual production vocabulary, and vocabulary comprehension. When comparing the two languages of bilingual participants, there were no significant differences in production vocabulary size or vocabulary comprehension scores. The results provide evidence that bilingual English-Chinese preschool-age children with ASD have the capacity to function successfully as bilinguals.
PubMed ID
21947709 View in PubMed
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Can bilingual two-year-olds code-switch?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36584
Source
J Child Lang. 1992 Oct;19(3):633-58
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1992
Author
E. Lanza
Author Affiliation
Department of Linguistics and Philosophy, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
J Child Lang. 1992 Oct;19(3):633-58
Date
Oct-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Attention
Child Language
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Language
Language Development
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Social Environment
Verbal Learning
Vocabulary
Abstract
Sociolinguists have investigated language mixing as code-switching in the speech of bilingual children three years old and older. Language mixing by bilingual two-year-olds, however, has generally been interpreted in the child language literature as a sign of the child's lack of language differentiation. The present study applies perspectives from sociolinguistics to investigate the language mixing of a bilingual two-year-old acquiring Norwegian and English simultaneously in Norway. Monthly recordings of the child's spontaneous speech in interactions with her parents were made from the age of 2;0 to 2;7. An investigation into the formal aspects of the child's mixing and the context of the mixing reveals that she does differentiate her language use in contextually sensitive ways, hence that she can code-switch. This investigation stresses the need to examine more carefully the roles of dominance and context in the language mixing of young bilingual children.
PubMed ID
1429952 View in PubMed
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Cerebellar tasks do not distinguish between children with developmental dyslexia and children with intellectual disability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161521
Source
Child Neuropsychol. 2007 Sep;13(5):389-407
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Robert Savage
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Education, McGill University, Montreal, Canada. Robert.savage@mcgill.ca
Source
Child Neuropsychol. 2007 Sep;13(5):389-407
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebellum - physiopathology
Child
Cognition
Dyslexia - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Intellectual Disability - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Intelligence
Intelligence Tests
Language Tests
Male
Motor Skills Disorders - diagnosis - epidemiology - psychology
Phonetics
Posture
Psychomotor Performance
Quebec - epidemiology
Reaction Time
Reading
Task Performance and Analysis
Vocabulary
Abstract
This paper explored the claim that only children with developmental dyslexia, whose reading ability is discrepant from their average general reasoning ability show specific deficits in motor tasks assessing cerebellar functioning (Fawcett et al., 2001, Cerebellar tests differentiate between groups of poor readers with and without IQ discrepancy. J. Learning Disabilities, 34, 119) and rapid serial naming (RAN, Wolf & Bowers, 1999, The double deficit hypothesis for the developmental dyslexias. J. Educ. Psychol., 91, 1). All available children between the ages of 11 and 14 were recruited from two special schools for children with either (a) formally-diagnosed intellectual disabilities (N = 18); or (b) formal diagnoses of developmental dyslexia (N = 25). These two groups of children did not differ on gender, age, pseudoword decoding abilities, or on 7 of 8 literacy measures, but did differ significantly, as expected on verbal and non-verbal reasoning tasks. Importantly, there were no deficits in bead threading ability or postural stability in the children with developmental dyslexia compared to the children with intellectual disabilities. There were also no between-group differences in rapid naming measures. The present results therefore provide no support for the claim that cerebellar deficits or RAN distinguish between children with dyslexia and children with intellectual disabilities that include reading.
PubMed ID
17805993 View in PubMed
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138 records – page 1 of 14.