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42 records – page 1 of 5.

Advanced glycation end product in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198719
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Apr;247(4):485-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2000
Author
N. Nyhlin
Y. Ando
R. Nagai
O. Suhr
M. El Sahly
H. Terazaki
T. Yamashita
M. Ando
S. Horiuchi
Author Affiliation
Gastroenterology and Hepatology Section, Department of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital, S-901 85 Umeå, Sweden.
Source
J Intern Med. 2000 Apr;247(4):485-92
Date
Apr-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Amyloid Neuropathies - genetics - pathology - surgery
Biopsy
Connective Tissue - pathology
Female
Glycosylation End Products, Advanced - analysis
Humans
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Intestinal Mucosa - pathology
Liver Transplantation
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle, Smooth, Vascular - pathology
Vitrectomy
Vitreous Body - pathology
Abstract
Advanced glycation end products (AGE) are present in amyloid deposits in beta2-microglobulin amyloidosis, and it has been postulated that glycation of beta2-microglobulin may be involved in fibril formation. The aim of this paper was to ascertain whether AGE occur in amyloid deposits in familial amyloidotic polyneuropathy (FAP).
Department of Medicine, Umeå University Hospital and First Department of Internal Medicine, Kumamoto University School of Medicine.
The presence of AGE was sought immunohistochemically and biochemically in amyloid-rich tissues from patients with FAP.
Biopsy specimens from nine patients and 10 controls were used for the immunohistochemical analysis. For amyloid preparation, vitreous samples from three FAP patients were used.
Immunohistochemical studies using a polyclonal anti-AGE antibody revealed positive immunoreactivity in intestinal materials, but the pattern of reactivity was unevenly distributed; it was often present in the border of amyloid deposits, or surrounding them. Non-amyloid associated immunoreactivity was also observed in a few regions of the specimens, although the AGE-positive structures were situated in areas containing amyloid deposits. Western blotting of purified amyloid from the vitreous body of FAP patients revealed a significant association of AGE with amyloid fibrils.
The immunoreactivity for the AGE antibody suggests that AGE may be involved in fibril formation in FAP.
PubMed ID
10792563 View in PubMed
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After-cataract in children having cataract surgery with or without anterior vitrectomy implanted with a single-piece AcrySof IOL.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29715
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2005 Apr;31(4):757-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2005
Author
Maria Kugelberg
Ulla Kugelberg
Nadiya Bobrova
Svetlana Tronina
Charlotta Zetterström
Author Affiliation
St. Erik's Eye Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden. m.kugelberg@sankterik.se
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2005 Apr;31(4):757-62
Date
Apr-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylic Resins
Adolescent
Age Factors
Anterior Eye Segment - surgery
Capsulorhexis
Cataract - etiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Lens Capsule, Crystalline - pathology - surgery
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Lenses, Intraocular
Male
Postoperative Complications
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vitrectomy - methods
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate whether cataract surgery in children should be performed with anterior vitrectomy and to examine the properties of the AcrySof SA30AL intraocular lens (IOL) in the pediatric eye. SETTING: Filatov Institute, Odessa, Ukraine. METHODS: Cataract surgery was performed in 66 children aged 3 to 15 years. They were randomized to surgery with or without anterior vitrectomy. All eyes were implanted with the single-piece AcrySof SA30AL IOL (Alcon). During the study, the patients who needed surgery for after-cataract had a second surgical procedure. Two years after surgery, the surgical method was evaluated using exact logistic regression. Also, the Evaluation of Posterior Capsule Opacification (EPCO) score was compared between the patients who had surgery for after-cataract and the patients who did not need this. The presence of posterior synechias and centration of the IOL were assessed. RESULTS: Children in the younger age group (
PubMed ID
15899453 View in PubMed
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Anatomical and visual outcomes of macular hole surgery with short-duration 3-day face-down positioning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature126428
Source
Retina. 2012 Mar;32(3):506-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
David R P Almeida
Jonathon Wong
Michel Belliveau
Jaspreet Rayat
Jeffrey Gale
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Queen's University, Hotel Dieu Hospital, Kingston, Ontario, Canada. dalmeida@evolation-medical.com
Source
Retina. 2012 Mar;32(3):506-10
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada
Cataract Extraction
Face
Female
Humans
Intraocular Pressure - physiology
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Care - methods
Postoperative Complications
Prone Position
Prospective Studies
Retinal Perforations - surgery
Visual Acuity - physiology
Vitrectomy - adverse effects - methods
Abstract
The role of face-down posturing after macular hole (MH) surgery remains unclear and controversial. We evaluated the anatomical and visual outcomes of MH repair using a short duration (3 days) of prone positioning.
Prospective series of 50 consecutive eyes in 50 patients with Stage 2 or Stage 3 idiopathic MHs. All eyes underwent vitrectomy MH surgery with internal limiting membrane peeling and 20% sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) gas tamponade. The procedure was combined with phacoemulsification cataract surgery in phakic eyes. Surgical outcomes, MH closure rates, complications, and postoperative visual acuity were investigated.
Anatomical closure of MHs was achieved in 49 (98%) of 50 eyes by 1 surgery. Postoperative logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution visual acuity decreased (i.e., improved) by 0.271 (95% confidence interval, 0.101-0.441 [P = 0.0024]). One complication of intraocular lens pupillary capture and one case of chronic cystoid macular edema were observed. There were no complications attributed to intraocular pressure fluctuations.
Vitrectomy with internal limiting membrane peeling and gas tamponade with SF6 followed by short-duration 3-day face-down positioning is a successful surgical intervention for Stage 2 and Stage 3 idiopathic MHs. This method possessed minimal complications and offered significant improvement in visual acuity.
PubMed ID
22392092 View in PubMed
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Clinicopathological changes at the vitreoretinal junction: posterior vitreous detachment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature157642
Source
Eye (Lond). 2008 Oct;22(10):1257-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
M P Snead
D R J Snead
S. James
A J Richards
Author Affiliation
Vitreoretinal Service, University of Cambridge Addenbrooke's NHS Trust, Cambridge, UK. mps34@cam.ac.uk
Source
Eye (Lond). 2008 Oct;22(10):1257-62
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Humans
Middle Aged
Vitrectomy
Vitreous Detachment - complications - pathology
Abstract
Separation of the vitreous and posterior hyaloid membrane (PHM) or posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) typically occurs between the ages of 45 and 65 years in the general population, but may occur earlier in myopic or otherwise predisposed individuals. Age-related synergetic changes occurring within the cortical and central gel must be distinguished from the PHM, which envelopes it. This study reports on the correlation between 'true' PVD seen clinically by the physician using dynamic examination, high-power slit-lamp biomicroscopy, and oblique illumination with some of its histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural features post-mortem. The presence of the Weiss ring does not necessarily indicate total clean separation of PHM, nor does its absence confirm that the PHM remains attached, since it may be destroyed during the process of separation. Immediately prior to PVD with the vitreous gel attached, the PHM must, by definition, form part of the inner limiting membrane. The detached PHM frequently exhibits basement membrane (BM) and its indigenous laminocytes stain focally for GFAP and type IV collagen. The PHM is distinct from and much thicker than the BM of Müller cells alone and the factors that initiate or limit separation of the PHM require greater study, particularly the role of laminocyte proliferation and migration.
PubMed ID
18425061 View in PubMed
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Combined phacoemulsification, primary intraocular lens implantation, and pars plana vitrectomy in children with uveitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature269678
Source
Ocul Immunol Inflamm. 2015 Apr;23(2):144-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2015
Author
Sara Pålsson
Alf Nyström
Lena Sjödell
Gunnar Jakobsson
Eva Byhr
Marita Andersson Grönlund
Madeleine Zetterberg
Source
Ocul Immunol Inflamm. 2015 Apr;23(2):144-51
Date
Apr-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cataract - complications
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Intraocular Pressure
Lens Implantation, Intraocular - methods
Male
Phacoemulsification - methods
Postoperative Complications - epidemiology
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Uveitis - complications - physiopathology - surgery
Visual acuity
Vitrectomy - methods
Abstract
To evaluate the outcome of combined cataract surgery with primary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation and pars plana vitrectomy (PPV) in children with uveitis.
Data regarding visual acuity (VA), inflammatory status, medical therapy, and complications was collected from the medical charts of 17 children (21 eyes) with chronic uveitis who underwent combined cataract surgery and PPV at the Eye Clinic, Sahlgrenska/Mölndal, between 2002 and 2011.
Seventy-six percent of the children had juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Median preoperative VA was 1.70 logMAR and median VA after 12 months was 0.17 logMAR. Postoperatively, glaucoma developed in 7 eyes, cystoid macular edema in 3 eyes, and visual axis opacification requiring treatment in 5 eyes.
Although combined phacoemulsification, primary IOL implantation, and PPV in children with uveitis resulted in favorable visual outcome and stable inflammation in a majority of children, the technique should so far be reserved for uveitic cases with vitreous pathology.
PubMed ID
24564567 View in PubMed
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Complications after early surgery for congenital cataracts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50904
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1999 Dec;77(6):677-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1999
Author
A. Lundvall
C. Zetterström
Author Affiliation
St. Erik's Eye Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. anna.lundvall@ophste.hs.sll.se
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1999 Dec;77(6):677-80
Date
Dec-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cataract - congenital
Cataract Extraction - adverse effects
Comparative Study
Glaucoma, Angle-Closure - epidemiology - etiology - surgery
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Laser Surgery
Postoperative Complications
Reoperation
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Trabeculectomy
Vitrectomy
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the type and frequency of complications requiring additional surgery in infants operated on for congenital cataract before 12 months of age. METHODS: The medical records of 57 infants who underwent surgery for unilateral and bilateral congenital cataracts during a five-year-period were reviewed retrospectively. The follow-up period ranged from 9 to 70 months with a mean of 37 months. Cataract extraction was performed on 83 eyes. RESULTS: Thirty-eight operations for after-cataracts were performed on 32 out of 83 eyes. Fourteen vitrectomies were made on 11 eyes because of pupillary block glaucoma. Glaucoma requiring trabeculectomy developed in eight eyes 2 to 14 months after cataract extraction. This type of glaucoma occurred almost exclusively in eyes operated on during the first two months of life. CONCLUSION: Complications requiring additional surgery are very common in infants operated on for congenital cataracts during the first year of life. Glaucoma requiring trabeculectomy developed particularly in infants who had their cataract extraction very early. Glaucoma development was not more common in infants operated on for after-cataract.
PubMed ID
10634562 View in PubMed
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Diabetic vitrectomy in a large type 1 diabetes patient population: long-term incidence and risk factors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature260706
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2014 Aug;92(5):439-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2014
Author
Christoffer Ostri
Morten la Cour
Henrik Lund-Andersen
Source
Acta Ophthalmol. 2014 Aug;92(5):439-43
Date
Aug-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Blood Glucose - metabolism
Blood pressure
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - epidemiology - surgery
Diabetic Nephropathies - epidemiology
Diabetic Retinopathy - blood - epidemiology - surgery
Female
Hemoglobin A, Glycosylated - metabolism
Humans
Incidence
Laser Coagulation
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Registries
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitrectomy - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Diabetic vitrectomy represents an end-point of diabetic retinopathy progression. This study was designed to estimate long-term incidence of diabetic vitrectomy and associated risk factors.
Retrospective review of prospectively collected data from a large diabetes centre between 1996 and 2010. Surgical history was obtained from The Danish National Patient Register.
The population consisted of 3980 patients with type 1 diabetes. Median follow-up was 10.0 years. In total, 106 patients underwent diabetic vitrectomy in the observation period. Surgery indications were nonclearing vitreous haemorrhage (43%) or tractional retinal detachment (57%). The cumulative incidence rates of diabetic vitrectomy were 1.6% after 5 years and 2.9% after 10 years. When excluding patients with no or mild diabetic retinopathy, the corresponding rates were higher; 3.7% and 6.4%, respectively (p 75 mmol/mol in the observation period (p 0.05 for all variables).
Diabetic vitrectomy is rarely required in a type 1 diabetes population with varying degrees of retinopathy, but the risk increases markedly with poor metabolic control.
PubMed ID
23910735 View in PubMed
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Do we heed the endophthalmitis vitrectomy study in Canada?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187106
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2002 Dec;37(7):395-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Farhan Siddiqui
Craig Crippen
Cindy M L Hutnik
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Man.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2002 Dec;37(7):395-8
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - therapeutic use
Biopsy
Canada
Cataract Extraction - adverse effects
Endophthalmitis - microbiology - surgery
Eye Infections, Bacterial - microbiology - surgery
Health Surveys
Humans
Physician's Practice Patterns - statistics & numerical data
Postoperative Complications - microbiology - surgery
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Visual acuity
Vitrectomy
Abstract
The Endophthalmitis Vitrectomy Study (EVS) was a multicentre randomized clinical trial designed to guide the management of postoperative bacterial endophthalmitis. There is speculation that many physicians do not follow its recommendations, despite its intent. We surveyed Canadian vitreoretinal surgeons to determine whether surgeons are adopting the EVS recommendations in their management of bacterial endophthalmitis after cataract surgery.
A survey was sent to 98 vitreoretinal surgeons across Canada who manage postoperative endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. The survey explored the management of patients presenting with a hypopyon or suspected endophthalmitis, or both, early (up to 2 weeks) after cataract surgery. For purposes of comparison with the EVS, the questions were divided into presenting visual acuity categories.
Of the 98 surgeons 30 (30.6%) responded to the survey. The preferred treatment for patients presenting with no light perception visual acuity was pars plana vitrectomy (23 respondents [76.7%]); 7 respondents (23.3%) preferred vitreous tap/biopsy. All but one of the respondents stated that they prefer pars plana vitrectomy for patients presenting with light perception vision; the remaining physician preferred either pars plana vitrectomy or vitreous tap/biopsy. For patients with hand motions visual acuity, 17 respondents (56.7%) would perform pars plana vitrectomy, 11 (36.7%) would perform vitreous tap/biopsy, and 2 (6.7%) would perform either procedure. Most of the respondents (20 [66.7%]) would perform vitreous tap/biopsy for patients with visual acuity of counting fingers, whereas 9 (30.0%) would perform pars plana vitrectomy, and 1 (3.3%) would perform either procedure. All the respondents indicated that they would use intraocular antibiotic therapy for initial treatment, 29 (96.7%) would use topical antibiotic therapy, 17 (56.7%) would inject antibiotics subconjunctivally, and 1 (3.3%) would use intravenous antibiotic therapy. Fourteen respondents (46.7%) would use intraocular steroid therapy.
Most of the Canadian vitreoretinal surgeons who responded to this survey do not follow the recommendations of the EVS.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Ophthalmol. 2003 Jun;38(4):264; author reply 264-512870857
PubMed ID
12516720 View in PubMed
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Eales' disease in Inuit: report of four cases.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5358
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2003 Jun;81(3):304-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2003
Author
Birgitte Moldow
Morten la Cour
Author Affiliation
moldow@attglobal.net
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2003 Jun;81(3):304-8
Date
Jun-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Fluorescein Angiography
Glucocorticoids - therapeutic use
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits
Laser Coagulation
Male
Retinal Vasculitis - diagnosis - ethnology - therapy
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary - diagnosis - ethnology
Visual acuity
Vitrectomy
Abstract
PURPOSE: To report four cases of Eales' disease in Inuit from Greenland diagnosed within a 6.5-year period. There are no previous reports on Eales' disease among Greenlanders. METHODS: Four younger Inuit, three males and one female, were diagnosed with Eales' disease based on fundus changes and exclusion of possible differential diagnoses. Several studies point to a possible relation between Eales' disease and tuberculosis (TB); examination of possible exposure to TB was part of the clinical investigation. RESULTS: Retinal changes made panretinal laser photocoagulation necessary in all cases. Four eyes in three patients were vitrectomized. Three patients received oral corticosteroid treatment. The final visual outcome was relatively good, with a visual acuity below 6/60 (3/36) in only one vitrectomized eye. All patients had been exposed to TB. CONCLUSION: Eales' disease seems to be rather common in the small population of Inuit (56,000) in Greenland. Attention is required to ensure diagnosis and appropriate treatment, including laser photocoagulation, leading to a reasonably good prognosis.
PubMed ID
12780413 View in PubMed
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42 records – page 1 of 5.