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The Adjuvant Nutritional Intervention in Cancer (ANICA) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276361
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(8):1355-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Geir Bjørklund
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(8):1355-8
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Fatty Acids, Essential - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Middle Aged
Nutrition Therapy
Selenium - administration & dosage
Survival Rate
Trace Elements - administration & dosage
Ubiquinone - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Vitamins - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
Adjuvant Nutritional Intervention in Cancer (ANICA) was a clinical study carried out in Denmark in the 1990s with 32 typical patients with breast cancer, aged 32-81 yr and classified high risk because of tumor spread to the lymph nodes. The patients received standard therapy for their breast cancer, but got from the start additionally an adjuvant therapy in form of a cocktail consisting of vitamin C (2,850 mg/day), vitamin E (2,500 IU/day), beta-carotene (32.5 IU/day), selenium (Se; 387 micrograms/day), various other vitamins and essential trace elements, essential fatty acids (1.2 g gamma-linolenic acid/day and 3.5 g omega-3 PUFAs/day), and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, 90 mg/day). The protocol was later changed, with reduction of the Se intake and more coenzyme Q10 than when the study was started. The average survival of high-risk breast patients in the study was 50% after 5 yr, whereas for low-risk breast cancer patients (without metastases in the axilla when treatment was started), the average survival was 90% after ten years. The main investigator died, and the final report from the ANICA study was therefore never written. However, the published preliminary results from the trial were very promising; it seems, therefore, important to follow-up this study.
PubMed ID
26473998 View in PubMed
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Anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin E on experimental lens-induced uveitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51250
Source
Int Ophthalmol. 1992 Jan;16(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Cid
G. Pararajasegaram
A. Sevanian
W. Gauderman
J L Romero
G E Marak
N A Rao
Author Affiliation
Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA.
Source
Int Ophthalmol. 1992 Jan;16(1):27-32
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Arachidonic Acid - analysis
Choroid - chemistry - pathology
Crystallins - analysis
Female
Radioimmunoassay
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Uveitis - drug therapy - metabolism - pathology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Vitamin E Deficiency - drug therapy - metabolism - pathology
Abstract
The anti-phlogistic effect of dietary vitamin E supplementation on the acute inflammation observed in experimental lens-induced uveitis in Brown Norway rats was studied. The effects of vitamin E were examined using histopathologic parameters as well as by measuring the levels of arachidonic acid metabolites. Histologic examination of the eyes revealed that the vitamin E-deficient animals had the most severe destruction of the retina, while those animals receiving the vitamin E-supplemented diet exhibited the best preservation of the retinal architecture. Levels of arachidonic acid metabolites, as determined by radioimmunoassay, were significantly higher in vitamin E deficient rats as compared with rats on a normal diet.
PubMed ID
1537646 View in PubMed
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Antioxidants and cancers of the esophagus and gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20316
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 1;87(5):750-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2000
Author
P. Terry
J. Lagergren
W. Ye
O. Nyrén
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. paul.terry@mep.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 1;87(5):750-4
Date
Sep-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cardia - drug effects - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Drug Synergism
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
Antioxidant vitamins have attracted considerable attention in previous studies of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma, but dietary studies of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cardia remain sparse. Treating these tumors as distinct diseases, we studied intakes of vitamin C, beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol in a nationwide population-based case-control study in Sweden, with 185, 165, and 258 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma, and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, respectively, and 815 controls. Subjects with a high parallel intake of vitamin C, beta-carotene, and alpha-tocopherol showed a 40-50% decreased risk of both histological types of esophageal cancer compared with subjects with a low parallel intake. Antioxidant intake was not associated with the risk of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Separately, vitamin C and beta-carotene reduced the risk of esophageal cancers more than alpha-tocopherol. We found that antioxidant intake is associated with similar risk reductions for both main histological types of esophageal cancer. Our findings indicate that antioxidants do not explain the diverging incidence rates of the 2 histological types of esophageal cancer. Moreover, our data suggest that inverse associations with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma may be stronger among subjects under presumed higher oxidative stress due to smoking or gastroesophageal reflux, respectively. Our results may be relevant for the implementation of focused, cost-effective preventive measures.
PubMed ID
10925371 View in PubMed
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[Antioxidants and cardiovascular disorders--epidemiologic aspects. Should high risk patients receive supplementation?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215980
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Jan 20;115(2):227-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-20-1995
Author
S. Tonstad
Author Affiliation
Lipidklinikken, Medisinsk avdeling A, Rikshospitalet, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1995 Jan 20;115(2):227-9
Date
Jan-20-1995
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Intervention Studies
Male
Norway - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Abstract
Dietary antioxidants such as vitamin E, vitamin C, beta carotene and flavonoids may retard atherosclerosis by preventing low density lipoprotein oxidation. Observational epidemiological studies, including ecological correlations, case control and prospective studies, indicate that high vitamin E levels may be associated with decreased cardiovascular disease. Beta carotene may be protective among smokers and the elderly. Few studies have been able to show that vitamin C has a protective effect. A handful of intervention studies have examined the effects of vitamin E and beta carotene with mixed results. While few side effects of antioxidant supplementation are known, the results of current, large-scale studies in primary intervention must be awaited before recommendations can be made. Increased intake of fruits and vegetables that are rich in antioxidants is recommended.
PubMed ID
7855818 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Aug 21;168(34):2787-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-21-2006
Author
Skibsted Leif H
Dragsted Lars O
Dyerberg Jørn
Hansen Harald S
Kiens Bente
Ovesen Lars F
Tjønneland Anne M
Author Affiliation
Motions- og Ernaeringsrådets, Søborg. sm@meraadet.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Aug 21;168(34):2787-9
Date
Aug-21-2006
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Denmark
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Evidence-Based Medicine
Food Habits
Fruit
Health status
Humans
Nutrition Policy
Oxidative Stress
Risk factors
Vegetables
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Abstract
The Danish Fitness and Nutrition Council has evaluated the basis for recommendations on the intake of antioxidants and has found limited basis for increasing the recommended intake levels for the antioxidants vitamin C and E. Evidence was insufficient to support recommendations for polyphenol or carotenoid supplementation. Supplementation with high doses of vitamin E and beta-carotene may present a health risk. A high intake of fruit and vegetables is associated with a reduced risk of lifestyle diseases, but there is no evidence that this association is due to an antioxidant effect.
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2006 Oct 9;168(41):3537; author reply 353717066533
PubMed ID
16942696 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant vitamin intake and mortality in three Central and Eastern European urban populations: the HAPIEE study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature278739
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Mar;55(2):547-60
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2016
Author
Urszula Stepaniak
Agnieszka Micek
Giuseppe Grosso
Denes Stefler
Roman Topor-Madry
Ruzena Kubinova
Sofia Malyutina
Anne Peasey
Hynek Pikhart
Yuri Nikitin
Martin Bobak
Andrzej Pajak
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2016 Mar;55(2):547-60
Date
Mar-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Cardiovascular Diseases - mortality
Cause of Death
Czech Republic - epidemiology
Dietary Supplements
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - mortality
Poland - epidemiology
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Russia - epidemiology
Socioeconomic Factors
Surveys and Questionnaires
Urban Population
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Vitamins - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
The aim of the study was to assess the relationships between individual-level dietary intakes of antioxidant vitamins C, E and beta-carotene with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in three Central and Eastern European (CEE) populations.
Data from the Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial factors in Eastern Europe cohort study were used. At the baseline survey, between 2002 and 2005, 28,945 men and women aged 45-69 years were examined in Novosibirsk (Russia), Krakow (Poland) and seven Czech towns. Deaths in the cohorts were identified through mortality registers. Cox regression was used to estimate the association between vitamin consumption and all-cause, cardiovascular (CVD) disease and cancer mortality.
In multivariable-adjusted analyses, there were no clear inverse associations between antioxidant vitamin intakes and mortality, although in some groups, several hazard ratios (HRs) were significant. For example, in men, compared with the lowest quintile of vitamin C intake, all-cause mortality in the third and fourth quintiles was lower by 28 % (HR 0.72; 95 % CI 0.61-0.85) and by 20 % (HR 0.80; 95 % CI 0.68-0.95), respectively. CVD mortality was lower by 35 % (HR 0.65; 95 % CI 0.50-0.84) and by 23 % (HR 0.77; 95 % CI 0.59-0.99) in third and fourth quintile of vitamin C intake, respectively. In women, the third and fourth quintiles of dietary intake of vitamin E were associated with reduced risk of all-cause death by 33 % (HR 0.67; 95 % CI 0.53-0.84) and by 23 % (HR 0.77; 95 % CI 0.61-0.97), respectively. Consumption of vitamin C, vitamin E and beta-carotene was not related to CVD mortality in women and to cancer mortality in either gender.
This large prospective cohort study in CEE populations with low prevalence of vitamin supplementation did not find a strong, dose-response evidence for protective effects of antioxidant vitamin intake.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25762013 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant vitamins in the diet: relationships with other personal characteristics in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature216830
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1994 Dec;48(6):549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
R. Järvinen
P. Knekt
R. Seppänen
A. Reunanen
M. Heliövaara
J. Maatela
A. Aromaa
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Nutrition, University of Kuopio, Finland.
Source
J Epidemiol Community Health. 1994 Dec;48(6):549-54
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet Surveys
Employment
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Marital status
Middle Aged
Rural Health
Sex Factors
Smoking
Urban health
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Abstract
The study aimed to reveal associations between dietary antioxidant vitamins and other personal characteristics.
Population based, cross sectional survey.
Twenty seven rural, industrial, and semiurban communities in six different regions of Finland.
Subjects included 5304 men and 4750 women aged 15 years or older, who were interviewed about their dietary habits at the baseline study of the Finnish Mobile Clinic Health Examination Survey, 1967-72.
Intakes of carotenoids and vitamins A, E, and C were estimated from dietary history interviews covering the subjects' food consumption in the preceding year. In older age groups intakes of all the vitamins studied were low. Occupation had a profound effect on dietary antioxidant vitamins: intakes were highest in white collar workers and lowest in farmers; those classified as service workers, industrial workers, or housewives came in between. Current smoking was inversely associated with dietary carotenoids and vitamin C, especially in men. The vitamin intakes of ex-smokers were equal to or even slightly higher than those of never smokers. Married men had higher intakes of carotenoids and vitamin C than men living alone. Body mass index was not an important determinant of the intake of antioxidant vitamins.
The associations of dietary antioxidant vitamins with sociodemographic characteristics and smoking were strong enough to exert a confounding or modifying effect in studies on diet and diseases.
Notes
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PubMed ID
7830008 View in PubMed
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[Assessment of the protective effect of vitamin E during development of experimental myocardial damage]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9663
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2002 Nov-Dec;74(6):78-82
Publication Type
Article
Author
H V Donchenko
I V Kuz'menko
R F Zvaid
Author Affiliation
Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, NAS of Ukraine, Kyiv. dongv@palladin.biochem.kiev.ua
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2002 Nov-Dec;74(6):78-82
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Comparative Study
Creatine Kinase - blood
English Abstract
Epinephrine - pharmacology
Injections, Intramuscular
L-Lactate Dehydrogenase - blood
Myocardial Ischemia - chemically induced - pathology - prevention & control
Myocarditis - chemically induced - pathology
Rats
Vasoconstrictor Agents - pharmacology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
It was shown that creatinphosphokinase activity of blood serum might be used as a criterion for evaluating the level of sparsely distributed damage in myocardium as a result of adrenaline administration. The protective effect of vitamin E under adrenaline-induced myocarditis was studied. The best effect was obtained after triple intramuscular injection of vitamin E before administration of pathological agent. Intravenous injection of the preparation has no benefits over that of intramuscular way of administration. Preventive action of vitamin E shows functioning itself in an increase of the quantity and activity of ubiquinone--the component of electron transport chain in mitochondria.
PubMed ID
12924018 View in PubMed
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Baseline selenium status and effects of selenium and vitamin e supplementation on prostate cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature104917
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):djt456
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2014
Author
Alan R Kristal
Amy K Darke
J Steven Morris
Catherine M Tangen
Phyllis J Goodman
Ian M Thompson
Frank L Meyskens
Gary E Goodman
Lori M Minasian
Howard L Parnes
Scott M Lippman
Eric A Klein
Author Affiliation
Affiliations of authors: Cancer Prevention Program (ARK) and SWOG Statistical Center (AKD, CMT, PJG), Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; Department of Epidemiology (ARK, GEG) and Department of Environmental Health (GEG), University of Washington, Seattle, WA; University of Missouri, Research Reactor Center, Columbia, MO (JSM); Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO (JSM); Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (IMT); Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA (FLM); Division of Cancer Prevention, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (LMM, HLP); Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego, San Diego, CA (SML); Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (EAK).
Source
J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):djt456
Date
Mar-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
African Americans - statistics & numerical data
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Dietary Supplements - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nails - chemistry
Neoplasm Grading
Odds Ratio
Proportional Hazards Models
Prostatic Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - pathology
Puerto Rico - epidemiology
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Risk
Selenium - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Trace Elements - adverse effects
United States - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - adverse effects - analysis
Vitamins - adverse effects
Abstract
The Selenium and Vitamin E Cancer Prevention Trial found no effect of selenium supplementation on prostate cancer (PCa) risk but a 17% increased risk from vitamin E supplementation. This case-cohort study investigates effects of selenium and vitamin E supplementation conditional upon baseline selenium status.
There were 1739 total and 489 high-grade (Gleason 7-10) PCa cases and 3117 men in the randomly selected cohort. Proportional hazards models estimated hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for effects of supplementation within quintiles of baseline toenail selenium. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazard ratios, and all statistical tests are two-sided.
Toenail selenium, in the absence of supplementation, was not associated with PCa risk. Selenium supplementation (combined selenium only and selenium + vitamin E arms) had no effect among men with low selenium status (
Notes
Comment In: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2014 Mar;106(3):dju00524563520
Comment In: Nat Rev Urol. 2014 Apr;11(4):18424619375
PubMed ID
24563519 View in PubMed
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Caregivers' male gender is associated with poor nutrient intake in AD families (NuAD-trial).

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262964
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2014 Jul;18(7):672-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2014
Author
T M Puranen
S E Pietila
K H Pitkala
H. Kautiainen
M. Raivio
U. Eloniemi-Sulkava
S K Jyvakorpi
M. Suominen
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2014 Jul;18(7):672-6
Date
Jul-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alzheimer Disease - complications
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Body mass index
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Caregivers
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Malnutrition - complications
Nutrition Assessment
Nutritional Status
Sex Factors
Spouses
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Abstract
Alzheimer patients (AD) are known to be at risk for malnutrition and their older spouses may also have nutritional problems. The aim of our study was to clarify the association of caregivers' sex on the nutrient intake of AD couples.
Our study uses the baseline data of a randomized nutritional trial exploring the effectiveness of nutrition intervention among home-dwelling AD patients.
The central AD register in Finland was used to recruit AD patients living with a spousal caregiver, 99 couples participated in our study.
Nutritional status was assessed using the Mini-Nutritional Assessment (MNA). Nutrient intakes for both AD patients and their spouses were calculated from 3-day food diaries.
The mean age of caregivers and AD spouses was 75.2 (SD 7.0) and 77.4 years (SD 5.6), respectively. According to the MNA, 40% of male and 52% of female AD spouses were at risk for malnutrition. Among male caregivers, the mean energy and protein intakes were 1605 kcal (SD 458) and 0.93 g/body kg (SD 0.30), whereas the respective figures for their female AD spouses were 1313 kcal (SD 340) and 0.86 g/body kg (SD 0.32), respectively. Among female caregivers, the mean energy and protein intakes were 1536 kcal (SD 402) and 1.00 g/body kg (SD 0.30), whereas the respective figures for their male AD spouses were 1897 kcal (SD 416) and 1.04 g/body kg (SD 0.30). The interaction between male caregiver sex and lower energy (p
PubMed ID
25226105 View in PubMed
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74 records – page 1 of 8.