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[Activity of ceruloplasmin, carbonic anhydrase and saturation of transferrin with iron in blood serum of rats developing experimental sarcoma M-1 against a background of E-avitaminosis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28609
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1969;41(4):393-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
1969

The Adjuvant Nutritional Intervention in Cancer (ANICA) Trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276361
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(8):1355-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Geir Bjørklund
Source
Nutr Cancer. 2015;67(8):1355-8
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Breast Neoplasms - mortality - pathology - therapy
Chemotherapy, Adjuvant
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Fatty Acids, Essential - administration & dosage
Female
Humans
Lymphatic Metastasis
Middle Aged
Nutrition Therapy
Selenium - administration & dosage
Survival Rate
Trace Elements - administration & dosage
Ubiquinone - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Vitamins - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
Adjuvant Nutritional Intervention in Cancer (ANICA) was a clinical study carried out in Denmark in the 1990s with 32 typical patients with breast cancer, aged 32-81 yr and classified high risk because of tumor spread to the lymph nodes. The patients received standard therapy for their breast cancer, but got from the start additionally an adjuvant therapy in form of a cocktail consisting of vitamin C (2,850 mg/day), vitamin E (2,500 IU/day), beta-carotene (32.5 IU/day), selenium (Se; 387 micrograms/day), various other vitamins and essential trace elements, essential fatty acids (1.2 g gamma-linolenic acid/day and 3.5 g omega-3 PUFAs/day), and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10, 90 mg/day). The protocol was later changed, with reduction of the Se intake and more coenzyme Q10 than when the study was started. The average survival of high-risk breast patients in the study was 50% after 5 yr, whereas for low-risk breast cancer patients (without metastases in the axilla when treatment was started), the average survival was 90% after ten years. The main investigator died, and the final report from the ANICA study was therefore never written. However, the published preliminary results from the trial were very promising; it seems, therefore, important to follow-up this study.
PubMed ID
26473998 View in PubMed
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The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217767
Source
Nutr Rev. 1994 Jul;52(7):242-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1994
Author
J. Blumberg
G. Block
Author Affiliation
USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University, Boston, MA.
Source
Nutr Rev. 1994 Jul;52(7):242-5
Date
Jul-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Carotenoids - therapeutic use
Cohort Studies
Double-Blind Method
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin E - therapeutic use
beta Carotene
Abstract
The U.S. National Cancer Institute and the Finnish National Public Institute jointly sponsored a large double-blind, placebo-controlled primary-prevention trial to examine the effects of vitamin E and beta-carotene supplementation on reducing the incidence of lung cancers in male smokers, ages 50-69 years. Supplementation did not result in a significant reduction in lung cancer, and a higher incidence of lung cancer was observed in the group receiving beta-carotene. These results should be examined within the context of the population studied before they are cited as definitive.
PubMed ID
8090376 View in PubMed
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The alpha-tocopherol, beta-carotene lung cancer prevention study: design, methods, participant characteristics, and compliance. The ATBC Cancer Prevention Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219137
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):1-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Source
Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):1-10
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adjuvants, Immunologic - therapeutic use
Aged
Carotenoids - therapeutic use
Clinical Protocols
Double-Blind Method
Drug Monitoring
Drug Therapy, Combination
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - mortality - prevention & control - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Patient compliance
Population Surveillance
Primary prevention - methods
Research Design
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Vitamin E - therapeutic use
beta Carotene
Abstract
The Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene (ATBC) Lung Cancer Prevention Study was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, 2 x 2 factorial design, primary prevention trial testing the hypothesis that alpha-tocopherol (50 mg/day) and beta-carotene (20 mg/day) supplements reduce the incidence of lung cancer and possibly other cancers. Total and disease-specific mortality and incidence of various diseases and symptoms were monitored for safety. Between 1985 and 1993, 29,133 eligible male smokers aged 50 to 69 years at entry were randomized to receive daily active supplements or placebo capsules for 5 to 8 years (median 6.1 years), accumulating 169,751 follow-up years. This report describes the study design, methods, and protocol as well as the baseline characteristics and capsule compliance of the participants. The ATBC Study is the largest lung cancer chemoprevention trial conducted to date.
Notes
Comment In: Ann Epidemiol. 1994 Jan;4(1):758205274
PubMed ID
8205268 View in PubMed
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Analyzing bivariate continuous data grouped into categories defined by empirical quantiles of marginal distributions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207630
Source
Biometrics. 1997 Sep;53(3):1054-69
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1997
Author
C B Borkowf
M H Gail
R J Carroll
R D Gill
Author Affiliation
National Cancer Institute, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, Bethesda, Maryland 20892-7368, USA.
Source
Biometrics. 1997 Sep;53(3):1054-69
Date
Sep-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Biometry - methods
Chi-Square Distribution
Confidence Intervals
Diet Records
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Questionnaires
Vitamin E
Abstract
Epidemiologists sometimes study the association between two measurements of exposure on the same subjects by grouping the original bivariate continuous data into categories that are defined by the empirical quantiles of the two marginal distributions. Although such grouped data are presented in a two-way contingency table, the cell counts in this table do not have a multinomial distribution. We describe the joint distribution of counts in such a table by the term empirical bivariate quantile-partitioned (EBQP) distribution. Blomqvist (1950, Annals of Mathematical Statistics 21, 539-600) gave an asymptotic EBQP theory for bivariate data partitioned by the sample medians. We demonstrate that his asymptotic theory is not correct, however, except in special cases. We present a general asymptotic theory for tables of arbitrary dimensions and apply this theory to construct confidence intervals for the kappa statistic. We show by simulations that the confidence interval procedures we propose have near nominal coverage for sample sizes exceeding 60 for both 2 x 2 and 3 x 3 tables. These simulations also illustrate that the asymptotic theory of Blomqvist (1950) and the methods that Fleiss, Cohen, and Everitt (1969, Psychological Bulletin 72, 323-327) give for multinomial tables can yield subnominal coverage for kappa calculated from EBQP tables, although in some cases the coverage for these procedures is near nominal levels.
PubMed ID
9290229 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Antihypoxic effect of vitamin E and its derivative in rats under modeling of hypoxic conditions of different origin]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9607
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2003 Mar-Apr;75(2):67-71
Publication Type
Article
Author
F R Zvaid
G V Donchenko
I V Kuz'menko
Author Affiliation
Palladin Institute of Biochemistry, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 2003 Mar-Apr;75(2):67-71
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anoxia - metabolism
Electron Transport
English Abstract
Enzyme Stability
Epinephrine - pharmacology
Leukocytes - enzymology - metabolism
Mitochondria, Heart - enzymology - metabolism
Myocarditis - chemically induced - metabolism
NAD(P)H Dehydrogenase (Quinone) - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Wistar
Succinate Dehydrogenase - metabolism
Ubiquinone - drug effects - metabolism
Vitamin E - pharmacology
Abstract
The increase of ubiquinone content in myocardial mitochondria and succinateubiquinone reductase activity in rat blood leucocytes under hypoxic hypoxia and acute microfocal myocardial damage [table: see text] have been shown. At the same time the succinateubiquinone reductase activity of rat myocardial mitochondria do not change substantially. We simultaneously observe the dramatic drop in NADH-ubiquinone reductase activity under experimental myocarditis. This fact demonstrates higher stability of succinateubiquinone reductase system and differences in metabolical processes under hypoxic conditions of different origin. All vitamin E derivatives studied demonstrate substantial antihypoxic activity, which is connected with increased animals' survivability, ubiquinone content in myocardial mitochondria and stabilization and leveling of succinateubiquinone reducatse activity in rat blood leucocytes. alpha-Tocopherolacetate with shortened to six carbon atoms side chain is the most effective in this respect. We discuss possible mechanisms for the realization of vitamin E and its active derivative's antihypoxic effect.
PubMed ID
14577173 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anti-inflammatory effects of vitamin E on experimental lens-induced uveitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51250
Source
Int Ophthalmol. 1992 Jan;16(1):27-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Cid
G. Pararajasegaram
A. Sevanian
W. Gauderman
J L Romero
G E Marak
N A Rao
Author Affiliation
Doheny Eye Institute, Los Angeles, CA.
Source
Int Ophthalmol. 1992 Jan;16(1):27-32
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal - therapeutic use
Arachidonic Acid - analysis
Choroid - chemistry - pathology
Crystallins - analysis
Female
Radioimmunoassay
Rats
Rats, Inbred BN
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Uveitis - drug therapy - metabolism - pathology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Vitamin E Deficiency - drug therapy - metabolism - pathology
Abstract
The anti-phlogistic effect of dietary vitamin E supplementation on the acute inflammation observed in experimental lens-induced uveitis in Brown Norway rats was studied. The effects of vitamin E were examined using histopathologic parameters as well as by measuring the levels of arachidonic acid metabolites. Histologic examination of the eyes revealed that the vitamin E-deficient animals had the most severe destruction of the retina, while those animals receiving the vitamin E-supplemented diet exhibited the best preservation of the retinal architecture. Levels of arachidonic acid metabolites, as determined by radioimmunoassay, were significantly higher in vitamin E deficient rats as compared with rats on a normal diet.
PubMed ID
1537646 View in PubMed
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Antioxidant dietary status and genetic cardiovascular risk, or how an adequate intake of a-tocopherol, selenium, taurine, magnesium and various other natural antioxidants may overcome the deleterious metabolic consequences related to the E4-4 type of apolipoprotein E.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61985
Source
Magnes Res. 1996 Jun;9(2):139-41
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996

Antioxidant-rich food intakes and their association with blood total antioxidant status and vitamin C and E levels in community-dwelling seniors from the Quebec longitudinal study NuAge.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137105
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2011 Jun;46(6):475-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2011
Author
Abdelouahed Khalil
Pierrette Gaudreau
Mounia Cherki
Richard Wagner
Daniel M Tessier
Tamas Fulop
Bryna Shatenstein
Author Affiliation
Research Centre on Aging, Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Canada. abdelouahed.khalil@usherbrooke.ca
Source
Exp Gerontol. 2011 Jun;46(6):475-81
Date
Jun-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - metabolism
Antioxidants - administration & dosage - metabolism
Ascorbic Acid - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Eating
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Motor Activity - physiology
Quebec
Reactive Oxygen Species - metabolism
Vitamin E - blood
Abstract
A cross-sectional study was designed to investigate the association between current consumption of a series of 26 common antioxidant-rich foods (ARF) with serum total antioxidant status (TAS) and plasma vitamin C and E levels in community-dwelling older adults. A convenience sample of the first 94 non-smoking Caucasian men (54%) and women (46%) enrolled in the Quebec Longitudinal Study NuAge were selected. The "Functional Foods Consumption Frequency Questionnaire" (FFCFQ) was administered at recruitment (T1) to ascertain patterns of consumption of ARF over the lifetime. The total Oxygen Radical Antioxidant Capacity (ORAC) of 25 ARF reported by subjects was estimated using published values. Serum TAS was determined based on the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay while plasma vitamins C and E (a- and ?-tocopherol) levels were analyzed by HPLC. The numbers of ARF eaten daily at T1, estimated from the FFCFQ and calculated from the diet recalls, were significantly correlated (r=0.51, P
PubMed ID
21316439 View in PubMed
Less detail

Antioxidants and cancers of the esophagus and gastric cardia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20316
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 1;87(5):750-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2000
Author
P. Terry
J. Lagergren
W. Ye
O. Nyrén
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. paul.terry@mep.ki.se
Source
Int J Cancer. 2000 Sep 1;87(5):750-4
Date
Sep-1-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - epidemiology - prevention & control
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - epidemiology - prevention & control
Cardia - drug effects - pathology
Case-Control Studies
Diet
Dietary Supplements
Drug Synergism
Esophageal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Gastroesophageal Reflux - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Oxidative Stress - drug effects
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Stomach Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
beta Carotene - administration & dosage
Abstract
Antioxidant vitamins have attracted considerable attention in previous studies of esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma, but dietary studies of adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and gastric cardia remain sparse. Treating these tumors as distinct diseases, we studied intakes of vitamin C, beta-carotene and alpha-tocopherol in a nationwide population-based case-control study in Sweden, with 185, 165, and 258 cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma, and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, respectively, and 815 controls. Subjects with a high parallel intake of vitamin C, beta-carotene, and alpha-tocopherol showed a 40-50% decreased risk of both histological types of esophageal cancer compared with subjects with a low parallel intake. Antioxidant intake was not associated with the risk of gastric cardia adenocarcinoma. Separately, vitamin C and beta-carotene reduced the risk of esophageal cancers more than alpha-tocopherol. We found that antioxidant intake is associated with similar risk reductions for both main histological types of esophageal cancer. Our findings indicate that antioxidants do not explain the diverging incidence rates of the 2 histological types of esophageal cancer. Moreover, our data suggest that inverse associations with esophageal squamous-cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma may be stronger among subjects under presumed higher oxidative stress due to smoking or gastroesophageal reflux, respectively. Our results may be relevant for the implementation of focused, cost-effective preventive measures.
PubMed ID
10925371 View in PubMed
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250 records – page 1 of 25.