Skip header and navigation

Refine By

7 records – page 1 of 1.

[All preschool children in Sweden need vitamin D fortified food. Dark-skinned children need vitamin D supplementation also after the age of 2].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99913
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Oct 13-19;107(41):2471-3
Publication Type
Article

[Daily dosage of 10 mg vitamin D to immigrants wearing well-covering dark clothes is not sufficient].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174803
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Apr 11;167(15):1655; author reply 1656
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-11-2005
Author
Henning Glerup
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Apr 11;167(15):1655; author reply 1656
Date
Apr-11-2005
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Clothing
Cultural Characteristics
Denmark - ethnology
Emigration and Immigration
Humans
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - etiology - prevention & control
Notes
Comment On: Ugeskr Laeger. 2005 Feb 21;167(8):895-715789843
PubMed ID
15892344 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Many Danes get too little of vitamin D].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187852
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Oct 21;164(43):5041-2; author reply 5042
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-21-2002
Author
Karl Favrbo
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Oct 21;164(43):5041-2; author reply 5042
Date
Oct-21-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Ergocalciferols - administration & dosage
Humans
Sunlight
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - etiology - prevention & control
Notes
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2003 Jan 6;165(2):142; author reply 14212553102
Comment In: Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Aug 30;166(36):3119; author reply 311915387322
PubMed ID
12422403 View in PubMed
Less detail

Modifiable determinants of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D status in early childhood: opportunities for prevention.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117257
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Mar 1;167(3):230-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2013
Author
Jonathon L Maguire
Catherine S Birken
Marina Khovratovich
Julie Degroot
Sarah Carsley
Kevin E Thorpe
Muhammad Mamdani
Patricia C Parkin
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, St Michael’s Hospital, 30 Bond St, 15-014 Cardinal Carter, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. jonathon.maguire@utoronto.ca
Source
JAMA Pediatr. 2013 Mar 1;167(3):230-5
Date
Mar-1-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Infant
Linear Models
Male
Milk
Ontario
Prospective Studies
Seasons
Skin pigmentation
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
OBJECTIVES To determine the effect of modifiable dietary intake variables (current vitamin D supplementation and daily cow's milk intake) on 25-hydroxyvitamin D level in early childhood and to evaluate the relationship between these modifiable dietary factors and other largely nonmodifiable determinants of vitamin D status including skin pigmentation and season. DESIGN Cross-sectional study. SETTING Primary care pediatric and family medicine practices participating in the TARGet Kids! practice-based research network in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. PARTICIPANTS From December 2008 to June 2011, healthy children 1 to 5 years of age were recruited during a routine physician's visit. INTERVENTIONS Survey, anthropometric measurements, and laboratory data were collected. A multivariable linear regression model was developed to examine the independent effects of vitamin D supplementation and daily volume of cow's milk on 25-hydroxyvitamin D level. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES 25-Hydroxyvitamin D level. RESULTS Blood was obtained in 1898 children. Two modifiable dietary intake variables, vitamin D supplementation and cow's milk, increased 25-hydroxyvitamin D level by 3.4 ng/mL (95% CI, 2-4 ng/mL) and 1.6 ng/mL per 250-mL cup per day (95% CI, 1-2 ng/mL), respectively. Two nonmodifiable variables reflecting cutaneous vitamin D synthesis (skin pigmentation and season) were also strongly associated with 25-hydroxyvitamin D status but accounted for a much smaller proportion of the explained variation in 25-hydroxyvitamin D level. The effect of vitamin D supplementation and milk intake on 25-hydroxyvitamin D level appeared similar regardless of skin pigmentation or season. CONCLUSION Two modifiable dietary intake variables (vitamin D supplementation and cow's milk intake) are the most important determinants of 25-hydroxyvitamin D status in early childhood.
PubMed ID
23318560 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Nutritional rickets. An old disease with new relevance]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34786
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 May 20;116(13):1582-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-1996
Author
L. Brunvand
T. Nordshus
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen, Ullevål sykehus, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 May 20;116(13):1582-4
Date
May-20-1996
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child Nutrition
Child, Preschool
Emigration and Immigration
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Norway
Pakistan - ethnology
Rickets - etiology - prevention & control - radiography
Vitamin D Deficiency - etiology - prevention & control - radiography
Abstract
Rickets caused by poor nutrition was widespread in Norway at the beginning of this century. Today it is a very rare disease among Norwegian children. During the last 20 years, however, it has become quite common among immigrant children who have come from developing countries to live in Norway. This is probably due to a combination of different factors such as maternal vitamin D deficiency, lack of vitamin D supplementation, long-lasting breast feeding, latitude (therefore little sunshine in winter) and lack of exposure to sunshine during the summer. The paper reviews the disease, with a special emphasis on clinical findings, diagnosis, treatment and prevention.
PubMed ID
8685870 View in PubMed
Less detail

Weather or not: the importance of vitamin D status monitoring and supplementation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature98383
Source
Minn Med. 2009 Nov;92(11):43-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Gregory A Plotnikoff
Author Affiliation
Penny George Institute for Health and Healing, Abbott Northwestern Hospital, USA.
Source
Minn Med. 2009 Nov;92(11):43-6
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cold Climate - adverse effects
Humans
Minnesota
Nutritional Requirements
Reference Values
Risk factors
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's latest data show markedly high prevalence rates of severe vitamin D deficiency among Americans of all ages. Because of the numerous negative health consequences associated with vitamin D deficiency, we must consider all potential causes including insufficient exposure to the sun's ultraviolet B radiation. This article presents data from the National Weather Service that documents how few days in Minnesota offer the opportunity to make vitamin D. Thus, even Minnesotans who spend a significant amount of time outdoors and consider themselves to have sufficient sun exposure may still be at risk for vitamin D deficiency. This is especially true for the elderly, those with high melanin content in their skin, and those with a higher body mass index, all of whom require significantly more sun to achieve adequate levels of vitamin D. Given the lack of sufficient ultraviolet B radiation people in Minnesota get from the sun between October and April, measurement of vitamin D status is required for rational replenishment and maintenance dosing. The goal of replenishment should be at least 32 ng/mL and, ideally, more than 50 ng/mL.
PubMed ID
20069998 View in PubMed
Less detail

7 records – page 1 of 1.