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25-Hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and risk of MS among women in the Finnish Maternity Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286504
Source
Neurology. 2017 Oct 10;89(15):1578-1583
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2017
Author
Kassandra L Munger
Kira Hongell
Julia Åivo
Merja Soilu-Hänninen
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Alberto Ascherio
Source
Neurology. 2017 Oct 10;89(15):1578-1583
Date
Oct-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - blood - epidemiology
Pregnancy - blood
Severity of Illness Index
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine whether and to what extent vitamin D deficiency is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) risk.
We conducted a prospective nested case-control study among women in the Finnish Maternity Cohort (FMC). The FMC had 1.8 million stored serum samples taken during the pregnancies of over 800,000 women at the time of this study. Through linkages with hospital and prescription registries, we identified 1,092 women with MS diagnosed between 1983 and 2009 with at least 1 serum sample collected prior to date of MS diagnosis; =2 serum samples were available for 511 cases. Cases were matched to up to 3 controls (n = 2,123) on date of birth (±2 years) and area of residence. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels were measured using a chemiluminescence assay. We used conditional logistic regression adjusted for year of sample collection, gravidity, and parity to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
A 50 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D was associated with a 39% reduced risk of MS (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.44-0.85), p = 0.003. Women with 25(OH)D levels
Notes
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PubMed ID
28904091 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Canadian adults: biological, environmental, and behavioral correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141385
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
L S Greene-Finestone
C. Berger
M. de Groh
D A Hanley
N. Hidiroglou
K. Sarafin
S. Poliquin
J. Krieger
J B Richards
D. Goltzman
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. linda.greene-finestone@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Skin Pigmentation - physiology
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We assessed vitamin D status and its correlates in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Results showed that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
PubMed ID
20730415 View in PubMed
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25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
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An association of serum vitamin D concentrations < 40 nmol/L with acute respiratory tract infection in young Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161510
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Sep;86(3):714-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Ilkka Laaksi
Juha-Petri Ruohola
Pentti Tuohimaa
Anssi Auvinen
Riina Haataja
Harri Pihlajamäki
Timo Ylikomi
Author Affiliation
Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Medical School, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. ilkka.laaksi@uta.fi
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Sep;86(3):714-7
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Disease Susceptibility
Exercise - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Military Personnel
Odds Ratio
Respiratory Tract Infections - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking - blood
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood - therapeutic use
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The effects of vitamin D in regulating bone mineralization are well documented. The action of vitamin D as a key link between Toll-like receptor activation and antibacterial responses in innate immunity has recently been shown. The data suggest that differences in the ability of human populations to produce vitamin D may contribute to susceptibility to microbial infection.
We aimed to explore whether an association exists between vitamin D insufficiency and acute respiratory tract infection in young Finnish men.
Young Finnish men (n = 800) serving on a military base in Finland were enrolled for this study. Their serum 25-hydroxyvitamin [25(OH)D] concentrations were measured in July 2002. They were followed for 6 mo, and the number of days of absence from duty due to respiratory infection were counted.
The mean (+/- SD) serum 25(OH)D concentrations were 80.2 +/- 29.3 nmol/L (n = 756). Subjects with serum 25(OH)D concentrations
PubMed ID
17823437 View in PubMed
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An increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations preceded a plateau in type 1 diabetes incidence in Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259846
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Nov;99(11):E2353-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Marjaana Mäkinen
Ville Simell
Juha Mykkänen
Jorma Ilonen
Riitta Veijola
Heikki Hyöty
Mikael Knip
Olli Simell
Jorma Toppari
Robert Hermann
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Nov;99(11):E2353-6
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food, Fortified
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
In Finland the world-record for the highest incidence of type 1 diabetes has risen steeply over the past decades. However, after 2006 the incidence rate has plateaued. We showed earlier, that despite the strong genetic disease component, environmental factors are driving the increasing disease incidence.
Since vitamin D intake has increased considerably in the country since 2003, we analyzed how serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration changed over time in healthy children, and the timely relation of these changes to disease incidence.
The birth cohort of the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention project was used to explore longitudinal changes in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin concentrations. The sampling period was limited to children born from 1994 to 2004, with serum samples collected during 1998-2006 in the Turku area, Southwest Finland (60 ?N).
25(OH)D concentrations were measured every 3-6 months from birth, ages ranging from 0.3 to 12.2 years (387 subjects, 5334 measurements).
Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were markedly lower before 2003 than after (69.3 ? 1.0 nmol/L vs 84.9 ? 1.3 nmol/L, respectively, P
PubMed ID
25062454 View in PubMed
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Are serum levels of vitamin D associated with semen quality? Results from a cross-sectional study in young healthy men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138926
Source
Fertil Steril. 2011 Mar 1;95(3):1000-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2011
Author
Cecilia Høst Ramlau-Hansen
Ulla Kristine Moeller
Jens Peter Bonde
Jørn Olsen
Ane Marie Thulstrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Occupational Medicine, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark; Department of Epidemiology, Institute of Public Health, University of Aarhus, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Fertil Steril. 2011 Mar 1;95(3):1000-4
Date
Mar-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Androgens - blood
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follicle Stimulating Hormone - blood
Humans
Male
Oligospermia - blood - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Rate
Risk factors
Semen - cytology
Sex Hormone-Binding Globulin - metabolism
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the association between low serum vitamin D concentration and estimates of male reproductive function.
Cross-sectional study.
University hospital.
From a Danish pregnancy cohort established in 1984-1987, 347 sons were selected for a study conducted in 2005-2006.
Semen parameters and reproductive hormones were related to vitamin D concentrations in 307 men.
Semen characteristics and reproductive hormones.
A high vitamin D level was unexpectedly associated with lower crude median total sperm count and percentage of normal morphology sperm and a high level of crude median sex hormone-binding globulin and FSH. After adjustment, the associations attenuated to nonsignificant associations, except for sex hormone-binding globulin. Additionally, adjusted free androgen index was lower at higher vitamin D levels, and men with high vitamin D had 11% (95% confidence interval, 1%-20%) lower free androgen index compared with men with low vitamin D.
These results do not indicate that low vitamin D is a risk factor for poor semen quality in a population of young healthy men, but we may not have enough men with low vitamin D levels to detect an effect. New studies should include a larger proportion of vitamin D-deficient men.
Notes
Comment In: J Urol. 2012 Jan;187(1):240-122153462
PubMed ID
21122842 View in PubMed
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Association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentration and symptoms of respiratory tract infection in a Norwegian population: the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257672
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Apr;17(4):780-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Steinar Robertsen
Guri Grimnes
Hasse Melbye
Author Affiliation
1 General Practice Research Unit, Department of Community Medicine, MH-building, Faculty of Health Science, University of Tromsø, 9037 Tromsø, Norway.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2014 Apr;17(4):780-6
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Respiratory Tract Infections - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
Previous studies have suggested anti-infection effects of vitamin D, although the associations reported between vitamin D (serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration) and respiratory tract infection (RTI) are conflicting. The main aim of the present study was to explore this association in a Norwegian population.
We examined the association between serum 25(OH)D and recent RTI symptoms in 6350 middle-aged and elderly participants in the Tromsø Study 6. The main outcome measurement was self-reported RTI symptoms in the previous week.
Tromsø, Norway, 69 °N.
Six thousand three hundred and fifty middle-aged and elderly residents of Tromsø.
Of the 6350 included, 791 (12.5%) reported RTI symptoms in the previous week. We classified serum 25(OH)D concentrations into quartiles and adjusted the data for current smoking habit and month of attendance. The prevalence of RTI symptoms did not increase with decreasing serum 25(OH)D level, was highest in quartile 3 (15.0%) followed by quartile 4 (12.4%), and was lowest in quartiles 1 and 2 (11.1% and 11.4%). There was no trend for increasing duration of illness with decreasing serum 25(OH)D. The prevalence of RTI symptoms was not significantly associated with the intake of fish, n-3 capsules or vitamin and/or mineral supplements, or sun exposure. Only use of cod-liver oil or fish oil capsules daily or sometimes was significantly associated with fewer RTI symptoms during the preceding 7 d (P = 0.04).
Low serum 25(OH)D was not associated with increased prevalence of recent RTI symptoms. Our findings do not support the idea that vitamin D supplementation can reduce the incidence of RTI in Norway.
PubMed ID
23659381 View in PubMed
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Association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D with the incidence of knee and hip osteoarthritis: a 22-year follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129996
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2012 Mar;41(2):124-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
S. Konstari
M. Paananen
M. Heliövaara
P. Knekt
J. Marniemi
O. Impivaara
J. Arokoski
J. Karppinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine, Institute of Clinical Sciences, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland. konstsan@mail.student.oulu.fi
Source
Scand J Rheumatol. 2012 Mar;41(2):124-31
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Comorbidity
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Osteoarthritis, Hip - blood - epidemiology
Osteoarthritis, Knee - blood - epidemiology
Reference Values
Seasons
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
In the light of conflicting results from previous studies on the role of vitamin D, we studied serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] with regard to its prediction of incident knee and hip osteoarthritis (OA).
The study population (n = 805) consisted of participants of a national health examination survey who had undergone baseline and follow-up clinical examinations at intervals of 20-23 years. Knee and hip OA were diagnosed on the basis of a standardized clinical examination by physicians with the same diagnostic criteria at baseline and follow-up. Information on covariates, including age, sex, season of blood draw, education, body mass index (BMI), physical workload, leisure time physical activity, smoking history, and previous injuries, was collected at baseline. Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were determined from baseline serum samples kept frozen at -20°C.
We found no significant association between serum 25(OH)D level and the risk of incident knee or hip OA. However, a statistically significant interaction between season of blood draw and serum 25(OH)D emerged when predicting the development of definite knee OA (p = 0.004). After adjusting for all the covariates, the relative odds (95% confidence interval) of developing definite knee OA per increment of 1 SD (20.7 ng/mL) in winter season 25(OH)D was 1.57 (1.10-2.27), whereas for summer season sera the corresponding rate was 0.53 (0.28-1.00).
The results do not support the hypothesis that a low level of serum 25(OH)D contributes to the development of OA. Instead, our study suggests that season is a potent effect modifier of 25(OH)D, which merits attention in future research.
PubMed ID
22043944 View in PubMed
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Association of serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D with the risk of death in a general older population in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139812
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2011 Aug;50(5):305-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Jyrki K Virtanen
Tarja Nurmi
Sari Voutilainen
Jaakko Mursu
Tomi-Pekka Tuomainen
Author Affiliation
University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio Campus, Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition, Finland. jyrki.virtanen@uef.fi
Source
Eur J Nutr. 2011 Aug;50(5):305-12
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Cardiovascular Diseases - blood - mortality
Cause of Death
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
To investigate the association between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentration, a marker of vitamin D status, and risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in a general older population with relatively low average serum 25(OH)D concentrations.
The study population included 552 men and 584 women aged 53-73 years who were free of CVD and cancer at baseline in 1998-2001 from the prospective, population-based Kuopio Ischaemic Heart Disease Risk Factor (KIHD) Study. Deaths were ascertained by a computer linkage to the national cause of death register. All deaths that occurred from the study entry to December 31, 2008, were included. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to analyze the association between serum 25(OH)D and risk of death.
The mean serum 25(OH)D concentration was 43.7 nmol/L (SD 17.8), with a strong seasonal variation. During the average follow-up of 9.1 years, 87 participants died, 35 from cardiovascular disease (CVD). After multivariable-adjustments, the hazard ratios (HR) for all cause death in the tertiles of serum 25(OH)D were 1, 1.68 (95% CI: 0.92, 3.07) and 2.06 (95% CI: 1.12, 3.80), p for trend = 0.02.
Our study supports the accumulating evidence from epidemiological studies that vitamin D deficiency is associated with increased risk of death. Large-scale primary prevention trials with vitamin D supplementation are warranted.
PubMed ID
20976461 View in PubMed
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Avoiding maternal vitamin D deficiency may lower blood glucose in pregnancy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature300174
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2019 02; 186:117-121
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2019
Author
Meabh Walsh
Linnea Bärebring
Hanna Augustin
Author Affiliation
Department of Internal Medicine and Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Dublin Institute of Technology, Trinity College Dublin, Ireland.
Source
J Steroid Biochem Mol Biol. 2019 02; 186:117-121
Date
02-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Blood Glucose - analysis
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Hyperglycemia - blood - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - blood - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
Vitamin D status is hypothesised to play a role in gestational glucose control. No studies to date have examined vitamin D in relation to changes in blood glucose in pregnancy. Thus, the aim was to examine if vitamin D in early pregnancy and vitamin D trajectory associate with blood glucose trajectory over pregnancy in a Swedish cohort. We also investigated the relation between maternal vitamin D status and excessive fetal growth.
In 2013-2014, pregnant women were recruited to the GraviD cohort study when registering at the antenatal clinics in south-west Sweden. In the present analysis, 1928 women were included. Women with preexisting diabetes and multifetal pregnancy were excluded. Random blood glucose was assessed according to routine practice, in first trimester (T1, gestational week 4-16), second trimester (T2, gestational week 17-27), early (T3a, gestational week 28-35) and late third trimester (T3b, gestational week 36-41). In T1 and T3a, serum 25-hydroxyvitamim D (25OHD) was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Large for gestational age (LGA), as a proxy of excessive fetal growth, was defined as body weight at birth above 2 standard deviations of the gender specific population mean. Adjusted linear regression, linear mixed models analysis and logistic regression analysis were used to study 25OHD in relation to T1 blood glucose, glucose trajectory and LGA, respectively.
Mean blood glucose increased during pregnancy (5.21?mmol/L in T1, 5.27?mmol/L in T2, 5.31?mmol/L in T3a and 5.34?mmol/L in T3b; p?=?0.003). In T1, 25OHD was negatively associated with blood glucose, i.e. 25OHD?=?30?nmol/L was associated with 0.25-0.35?mmol/L lower glucose. T1 25OHD was also negatively associated with blood glucose trajectory. Higher T3 25OHD was associated with higher odds of LGA (p?=?0.032).
Avoiding maternal vitamin D deficiency in early pregnancy is associated with lower blood glucose in early pregnancy and throughout pregnancy. Higher 25OHD in late pregnancy was associated with higher odds of LGA at birth.
PubMed ID
30308320 View in PubMed
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67 records – page 1 of 7.