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25-hydroxyvitamin D accumulation during summer in elderly women at latitude 60 degrees N.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149948
Source
J Intern Med. 2009 Nov;266(5):476-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2009
Author
Ann Burgaz
A. Akesson
K. Michaëlsson
A. Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. ann.burgaz@ki.se
Source
J Intern Med. 2009 Nov;266(5):476-83
Date
Nov-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Seasons
Sunlight
Sweden
Ultraviolet Rays
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
During half of the year, cutaneous synthesis of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is not detectable at northern latitudes, leaving the population dependent on other sources for optimal vitamin D status. During April to September, 25(OH)D status may be improved by solar exposure. In this study, we measured seasonal differences in serum 25(OH)D concentrations and identified the major predictors of summer 25(OH)D concentrations.
We assessed serum 25(OH)D concentrations during both winter and summer amongst 100 women, aged 61-83 years, randomly sampled from the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Participants completed two detailed questionnaires covering diet, use of dietary supplements and sun-related behaviour, the first in January through March and a second time in August through September.
The mean seasonal increase in serum 25(OH)D concentrations was 38% from mean 72 +/- 23 nmol L(-1) during winter to 99 +/- 29 nmol L(-1) in summer. High summer 25(OH)D concentrations were associated with higher winter concentrations, preference of staying in sun instead of shade, having a nonsensitive skin type and normal body mass index. Based on multiple linear regression modelling, preferring sun, having nonsensitive skin type and normal weight as compared with preferring shade, having sensitive skin type and being obese, was associated with a 64 nmol L(-1) higher 25(OH)D concentrations during summer.
Women with high winter 25(OH)D serum concentrations, with preference of staying in the sun instead of shade during summer, a skin type allowing for longer sun exposure and a normal weight had the highest summer 25(OH)D concentrations.
PubMed ID
19570054 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D and Peripheral Immune Mediators: Results from Two Nationwide Danish Pediatric Cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285851
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Apr 06;9(4)
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-06-2017
Author
Steffen U Thorsen
Christian B Pipper
Kristin Skogstrand
Flemming Pociot
Jannet Svensson
Source
Nutrients. 2017 Apr 06;9(4)
Date
Apr-06-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - diagnosis
European Continental Ancestry Group
Female
Humans
Immunologic Factors - blood
Infant, Newborn
Interleukin-8 - blood
Leptin - blood
Male
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
(1) Background: We aimed to examine if 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) was related to the peripheral immunological and inflammatory signature both at birth, and in newly diagnosed patients with childhood type 1 diabetes (T1D) and their healthy controls; (2) Methods: The birth cohort consisted of 470 patients and 500 healthy controls. Dried blood samples were collected from the neonates in the period 1981-1999. The newly diagnosed cohort consisted of 460 patients and 453 siblings. Serum samples were collected in the period 1997-2005. A variety of peripheral immune mediators were measured and compared to total 25(OH)D levels (25(OH)D2 + 25(OH)D3). For each immune mediator, the relative change (RC) in the mean level was modeled by robust log-normal regression and correction for multiple testing was performed; (3) Results: Two associations were identified; there was a negative association between 25(OH)D (10 nmol/L increase) and leptin (RC (95% confidence interval (CI)), 0.98 (0.96; 1.00)), and a positive association between 25(OH)D (10 nmol/L increase) and the chemokine, chemokine (c-x-c motif) ligand (CXCL) 8 (RC (95% CI), 1.07 (1.01; 1.13)); (4) Conclusion: CXCL8 and leptin have significant associations with levels of 25(OH)D in the newly diagnosed cohort. These results do not indicate a strong influence of 25(OH)D on the peripheral immunological or inflammatory signature.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28383493 View in PubMed
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25-hydroxyvitamin D and symptomatic ischemic stroke: an original study and meta-analysis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature118271
Source
Ann Neurol. 2013 Jan;73(1):38-47
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2013
Author
Peter Brøndum-Jacobsen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Peter Schnohr
Marianne Benn
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Ann Neurol. 2013 Jan;73(1):38-47
Date
Jan-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Brain Ischemia - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Surveillance - methods
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Stroke - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
We tested the hypothesis that low plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with increased risk of symptomatic ischemic stroke in the general population.
We measured plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10,170 individuals from the general population, the Copenhagen City Heart Study. During 21 years of follow-up, 1,256 and 164 persons developed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. In a meta-analysis of ischemic stroke, we included 10 studies, 58,384 participants, and 2,644 events.
Stepwise decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were associated with stepwise increasing risk of ischemic stroke both as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories and as a function of clinical categories of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p for trend = 2 × 10(-3)). In a Cox regression model comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations between the 1st and 4th percentiles to individuals with 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations between the 50th and 100th percentiles, multivariate adjusted hazard ratio of ischemic stroke was 1.82 (95% confidence interval, 1.41-2.34). Comparing individuals with clinical categories of severe vitamin D deficiency (
PubMed ID
23225498 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D Concentration and Leukocyte Telomere Length in Young Adults: Findings From the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature273332
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2016 Feb 1;183(3):191-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2016
Author
Dylan M Williams
Saranya Palaniswamy
Sylvain Sebert
Jessica L Buxton
Alexandra I F Blakemore
Elina Hyppönen
Marjo-Riitta Jarvelin
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2016 Feb 1;183(3):191-8
Date
Feb-1-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adiposity
Adult
Body mass index
C-Reactive Protein - metabolism
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Finland
Humans
Leukocytes
Male
Prospective Studies
Telomere Homeostasis
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Abstract
Higher vitamin D status, lower adiposity, and longer telomere length are each reportedly associated with lower risk of several chronic diseases and all-cause mortality. However, direct relationships between vitamin D status (measured by circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) concentration), adiposity, and telomere length are not well established. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of associations of 25(OH)D and body mass index (BMI; weight (kg)/height (m)(2)) with mean relative leukocyte telomere length (LTL) using data gathered on 5,096 participants from Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 at age 31 years (1997). 25(OH)D was not associated with LTL in either basic or confounder/mediator-adjusted models. BMI was inversely associated with LTL after adjustment for potential confounding by age, sex, socioeconomic position, physical activity, diet, smoking, alcohol intake, and use of oral contraceptives (per 1-unit increase in BMI, mean difference in LTL = -0.4%, 95% confidence interval: -0.6, -0.2). The BMI-LTL association was also independent of 25(OH)D and was attenuated slightly, but remained, after adjustment for C-reactive protein, a marker of low-grade inflammation (mean difference in LTL = -0.3%, 95% confidence interval -0.6, -0.1). These findings suggest that vitamin D status is unlikely to be an important determinant of LTL, at least by young adulthood. Inflammation may partly mediate associations of adiposity with LTL.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26797572 View in PubMed
Less detail

25-Hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population with 18,791 participants.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117634
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):423-31
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
P. Brøndum-Jacobsen
M. Benn
A. Tybjaerg-Hansen
B G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev, Denmark.
Source
J Thromb Haemost. 2013 Mar;11(3):423-31
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark
Down-Regulation
Female
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Linear Models
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Seasons
Time Factors
Venous Thromboembolism - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
Vitamin D has potential antithrombotic effects, suggesting that vitamin D analogs could be used as adjunctive antithrombotic agents. However, epidemiologic evidence of an association between reduced 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations and the risk of venous thromboembolism is lacking.
To test the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism in the general population.
We prospectively studied 18 791 participants from the Copenhagen City Heart Study and the Copenhagen General Population Study. During up to 30 years of follow-up, 950 participants were diagnosed with venous thromboembolism. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations were adjusted for seasonal variation.
The cumulative incidence of venous thromboembolism as a function of age increased with decreasing tertiles of seasonally adjusted plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (log-rank trend: P = 4 × 10(-4) ). On comparison of participants in the lowest and the highest tertile of plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations, the crude risk estimate in a model adjusted for age and sex was a 37% (95% confidence interval [CI] 15-64%) increased risk of venous thromboembolism. The corresponding risk increase in a model adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking and cancer was 26% (95% CI 5-51%), and in a multivariable-adjusted model also including physical activity, hormone replacement therapy, menopausal status, oral contraception use and lipid-lowering therapy it was 28% (95% CI 6-53%). Furthermore, corresponding risk increases with attempts to correct for regression dilution bias were 103% (95% CI 37-202%), 70% (95% CI 14-155%) and 73% (95% CI 15-160%) in the three models, respectively.
In these large general population studies, we observed a stepwise increasing risk of venous thromboembolism with decreasing tertiles of seasonally adjusted plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations.
PubMed ID
23279309 View in PubMed
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25-Hydroxyvitamin D deficiency and risk of MS among women in the Finnish Maternity Cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286504
Source
Neurology. 2017 Oct 10;89(15):1578-1583
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-10-2017
Author
Kassandra L Munger
Kira Hongell
Julia Åivo
Merja Soilu-Hänninen
Heljä-Marja Surcel
Alberto Ascherio
Source
Neurology. 2017 Oct 10;89(15):1578-1583
Date
Oct-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Middle Aged
Multiple Sclerosis - blood - epidemiology
Pregnancy - blood
Severity of Illness Index
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine whether and to what extent vitamin D deficiency is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) risk.
We conducted a prospective nested case-control study among women in the Finnish Maternity Cohort (FMC). The FMC had 1.8 million stored serum samples taken during the pregnancies of over 800,000 women at the time of this study. Through linkages with hospital and prescription registries, we identified 1,092 women with MS diagnosed between 1983 and 2009 with at least 1 serum sample collected prior to date of MS diagnosis; =2 serum samples were available for 511 cases. Cases were matched to up to 3 controls (n = 2,123) on date of birth (±2 years) and area of residence. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) levels were measured using a chemiluminescence assay. We used conditional logistic regression adjusted for year of sample collection, gravidity, and parity to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs).
A 50 nmol/L increase in 25(OH)D was associated with a 39% reduced risk of MS (RR 0.61, 95% CI 0.44-0.85), p = 0.003. Women with 25(OH)D levels
Notes
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PubMed ID
28904091 View in PubMed
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25-hydroxyvitamin D levels among healthy children in Alaska.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4777
Source
J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):434-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2003
Author
Bradford D Gessner
Julia Plotnik
Pam T Muth
Author Affiliation
Alaska Division of Public Health, PO Box 240249, 3601 C Street, Anchorage, AK 99524, USA. Brad_Gessner@health.state.ak.us
Source
J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):434-7
Date
Oct-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska - epidemiology
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Breast Feeding
Female
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - epidemiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To determine vitamin D levels among children 6 to 23 months old receiving services from Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) programs in Alaska.Study design During 2001 and 2002, we recruited 133 children receiving services at seven WIC clinics, administered a risk factor questionnaire, and collected blood. RESULTS: Fifteen (11%) and 26 (20%) children, respectively, had vitamin D levels or =25 ng/mL. Among 41 still breast-feeding children, 14 (34%) took supplemental vitamins, and six (18%) were reported to have received vitamins every day. CONCLUSIONS: Vitamin D deficiency is prevalent in Alaska. Breast-feeding in the absence of adequate vitamin D supplementation is the greatest risk factor.
Notes
Comment In: J Pediatr. 2003 Oct;143(4):422-314571210
PubMed ID
14571215 View in PubMed
Less detail

25-hydroxyvitamin d levels and risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death: population-based study and meta-analyses of 18 and 17 studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121124
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Nov;32(11):2794-802
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2012
Author
Peter Brøndum-Jacobsen
Marianne Benn
Gorm B Jensen
Børge G Nordestgaard
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Herlev Hospital, Copenhagen University Hospital, Herlev Ringvej 75, DK-2730 Herlev, Denmark.
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2012 Nov;32(11):2794-802
Date
Nov-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Biological Markers - blood
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Myocardial Ischemia - blood - epidemiology - mortality
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Time Factors
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - diagnosis - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
We tested the hypothesis that reduced plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D associates with increased risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death.
We measured baseline plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10 170 women and men from the Danish general population without vitamin D-fortified food. During 29 years of follow-up, 3100 persons developed ischemic heart disease, 1625 myocardial infarction, and 6747 died. Decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels were associated with increasing risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories (P for trend, 2×10(-4)-3×10(-53)). Comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels at the 1st to 4th percentile with individuals with levels at the 50th to 100th percentile, the multivariable adjusted risk was increased by 40% (95% CI, 14%-72%) for ischemic heart disease, by 64% (25%-114%) for myocardial infarction, by 57% (38%-78%) for early death, and by 81% (40%-135%) for fatal ischemic heart disease/myocardial infarction. In the meta-analyses of 18 and 17 studies, risk of ischemic heart disease and early death were increased by 39% (25%-54%) and 46% (31%-64%) for lowest versus highest quartile of 25-hydroxyvitamin D level.
We observed increasing risk of ischemic heart disease, myocardial infarction, and early death with decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels. These findings were substantiated in meta-analyses.
PubMed ID
22936341 View in PubMed
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An association of serum vitamin D concentrations < 40 nmol/L with acute respiratory tract infection in young Finnish men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161510
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Sep;86(3):714-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2007
Author
Ilkka Laaksi
Juha-Petri Ruohola
Pentti Tuohimaa
Anssi Auvinen
Riina Haataja
Harri Pihlajamäki
Timo Ylikomi
Author Affiliation
Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Medical School, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland. ilkka.laaksi@uta.fi
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2007 Sep;86(3):714-7
Date
Sep-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Disease Susceptibility
Exercise - physiology
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Male
Military Personnel
Odds Ratio
Respiratory Tract Infections - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Smoking - blood
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood - therapeutic use
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
The effects of vitamin D in regulating bone mineralization are well documented. The action of vitamin D as a key link between Toll-like receptor activation and antibacterial responses in innate immunity has recently been shown. The data suggest that differences in the ability of human populations to produce vitamin D may contribute to susceptibility to microbial infection.
We aimed to explore whether an association exists between vitamin D insufficiency and acute respiratory tract infection in young Finnish men.
Young Finnish men (n = 800) serving on a military base in Finland were enrolled for this study. Their serum 25-hydroxyvitamin [25(OH)D] concentrations were measured in July 2002. They were followed for 6 mo, and the number of days of absence from duty due to respiratory infection were counted.
The mean (+/- SD) serum 25(OH)D concentrations were 80.2 +/- 29.3 nmol/L (n = 756). Subjects with serum 25(OH)D concentrations
PubMed ID
17823437 View in PubMed
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Are national vitamin D guidelines sufficient to maintain adequate blood levels in children?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171541
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Nov-Dec;96(6):443-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
Daniel E Roth
Pat Martz
Rochelle Yeo
Connie Prosser
Melissa Bell
Adrian B Jones
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB.
Source
Can J Public Health. 2005 Nov-Dec;96(6):443-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Alberta - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet
Female
Humans
Male
Nutritional Requirements
Nutritional Status
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Vitamin D - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - etiology
Abstract
Vitamin D insufficiency (defined as 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] concentrations 0.45 mcg/kg/day.
Vitamin D insufficiency may be common among children and adolescents at the beginning of spring. The risk may be highest among older children because vitamin D intake does not adequately rise in proportion with increases in body mass. Further studies are needed to assess whether Canadian dietary vitamin D recommendations should be changed.
PubMed ID
16350869 View in PubMed
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243 records – page 1 of 25.