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25-Hydroxycholecaliferol and fractures of the proximal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature252013
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-16-1975
Author
B. Lund
O H Sorensen
A B Christensen
Source
Lancet. 1975 Aug 16;2(7929):300-2
Date
Aug-16-1975
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Alkaline Phosphatase - blood
Calcium - blood
Clinical Trials as Topic
Denmark
Femoral Fractures - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Great Britain
Humans
Hydroxycholecalciferols - blood - metabolism
Kidney - metabolism
Middle Aged
Osteomalacia - blood - complications - etiology
Phosphorus - blood
Seasons
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
Plasma 25-hydroxycholecalciferol (25-H.C.C.) has been measured in 67 consective cases of fracture of the proximal femur. The values found in these patients were not different from values found in these patients were not different from those in control groups at the same time of the year. Plasma 25-H.C.C. was not correlated to plasma calcium or phosphorus, the Ca times P product, or the alkaline phosphatase. X-rays showed Looser zones in only 1 patient, in whom the lowest plasma 25-H.C.C. was found. Osteomalacia is not uncommon among elderly people in Denmark, but it is more likely to depend on a decline in the renal efficiency to convert 25-H.C.C. to 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol than a low dietary intake of vitamin D.
PubMed ID
50509 View in PubMed
Less detail

25-Hydroxyvitamin D in Canadian adults: biological, environmental, and behavioral correlates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141385
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2011
Author
L S Greene-Finestone
C. Berger
M. de Groh
D A Hanley
N. Hidiroglou
K. Sarafin
S. Poliquin
J. Krieger
J B Richards
D. Goltzman
Author Affiliation
Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. linda.greene-finestone@phac-aspc.gc.ca
Source
Osteoporos Int. 2011 May;22(5):1389-99
Date
May-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Body mass index
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications - epidemiology
Seasons
Sex Distribution
Skin Pigmentation - physiology
Sunlight
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
We assessed vitamin D status and its correlates in the population-based Canadian Multicentre Osteoporosis Study (CaMos). Results showed that serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels
PubMed ID
20730415 View in PubMed
Less detail

25(OH)D levels in trained versus sedentary university students at 64° north.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290407
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Date
2017
Author
Scott P Jerome
Kendra D Sticka
Theresia M Schnurr
Sally J Mangum
Arleigh J Reynolds
Kriya L Dunlap
Author Affiliation
a Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , University of Alaska Fairbanks , Fairbanks , AK , USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2017; 76(1):1314414
Date
2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Arctic Regions
Athletes - statistics & numerical data
Body Weights and Measures
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Dietary Supplements
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Female
Humans
Male
Metabolic Equivalent
Sedentary lifestyle
Students
Sunlight
Universities
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) deficiency is associated with compromised bone mineralisation, fatigue, suppressed immune function and unsatisfactory skeletal muscle recovery. We investigated the risk of 25(OH)D insufficiency or deficiency in endurance athletes compared to sedentary non-athletes living at 64° north.
University student-athletes (TS) and sedentary students (SS) volunteered to participate in this study. TS engaged in regular exercise while SS exercised no more than 20 minutes/week. Metabolic Equivalent of Task (MET) scores for participants were determined. Vitamin D intake was assessed using the National Cancer Institute's 24-hour food recall (ASA24). Fasting plasma 25(OH)D levels were quantified via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.
TS reported higher activity levels than SS as assessed with MET-minutes/week and ranking of physical activity levels (p
Notes
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PubMed ID
28452288 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active surveillance: an essential tool in safeguarding the health and well-being of children and youth.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature162751
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Jul 17;177(2):169-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-17-2007
Author
Danielle Grenier
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont. danielleg@cps.ca
Source
CMAJ. 2007 Jul 17;177(2):169-71
Date
Jul-17-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Child Welfare
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Pediatrics - standards - trends
Prognosis
Rickets - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Sex Distribution
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamin D Deficiency - complications - diagnosis
Notes
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Comment On: CMAJ. 2007 Jul 17;177(2):161-617600035
PubMed ID
17600036 View in PubMed
Less detail

[All preschool children in Sweden need vitamin D fortified food. Dark-skinned children need vitamin D supplementation also after the age of 2].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99913
Source
Lakartidningen. 2010 Oct 13-19;107(41):2471-3
Publication Type
Article

An estimate of the economic burden and premature deaths due to vitamin D deficiency in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature144580
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2010 Aug;54(8):1172-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
William B Grant
Gerry K Schwalfenberg
Stephen J Genuis
Susan J Whiting
Author Affiliation
Sunlight, Nutrition, and Health Research Center (SUNARC), San Francisco, CA 94164-1603, USA. wbgrant@infionline.net
Source
Mol Nutr Food Res. 2010 Aug;54(8):1172-81
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
25-Hydroxyvitamin D 2 - blood
Adult
Calcifediol - blood
Canada - epidemiology
Child
Female
Health Care Costs
Humans
Infant
Male
Mortality
Nutrition Policy
Pregnancy
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - physiology
Vitamin D Deficiency - economics - epidemiology - physiopathology - prevention & control
Abstract
The objective of this work is to estimate the economic burden and premature death rate in Canada attributable to low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) levels. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to many diseases and conditions in addition to bone diseases, including many types of cancer, several bacterial and viral infections, autoimmune diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and adverse pregnancy outcomes. Canadians have mean serum 25(OH)D levels averaging 67 nmol/L. The journal literature was searched for papers reporting dose-response relationships for vitamin D indices and disease outcomes. The types of studies useful in this regard include randomized controlled trials, observational, cross-sectional, and ecological studies, and meta-analyses. The mortality rates for 2005 were obtained from Statistics Canada. The economic burden data were obtained from Health Canada. The estimated benefits in disease reduction were based on increasing the mean serum 25(OH)D level to 105 nmol/L. It is estimated that the death rate could fall by 37,000 deaths (22,300-52,300 deaths), representing 16.1% (9.7-22.7%) of annuals deaths and the economic burden by 6.9% (3.8-10.0%) or $14.4 billion ($8.0 billion-$20.1 billion) less the cost of the program. It is recommended that Canadian health policy leaders consider measures to increase serum 25(OH)D levels for all Canadians.
PubMed ID
20352622 View in PubMed
Less detail

An increase in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations preceded a plateau in type 1 diabetes incidence in Finnish children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259846
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Nov;99(11):E2353-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2014
Author
Marjaana Mäkinen
Ville Simell
Juha Mykkänen
Jorma Ilonen
Riitta Veijola
Heikki Hyöty
Mikael Knip
Olli Simell
Jorma Toppari
Robert Hermann
Source
J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2014 Nov;99(11):E2353-6
Date
Nov-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Child, Preschool
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - blood - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Food, Fortified
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - blood
Vitamin D Deficiency - blood - epidemiology
Abstract
In Finland the world-record for the highest incidence of type 1 diabetes has risen steeply over the past decades. However, after 2006 the incidence rate has plateaued. We showed earlier, that despite the strong genetic disease component, environmental factors are driving the increasing disease incidence.
Since vitamin D intake has increased considerably in the country since 2003, we analyzed how serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) concentration changed over time in healthy children, and the timely relation of these changes to disease incidence.
The birth cohort of the Finnish Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention project was used to explore longitudinal changes in serum 25-hydroxyvitamin concentrations. The sampling period was limited to children born from 1994 to 2004, with serum samples collected during 1998-2006 in the Turku area, Southwest Finland (60 ?N).
25(OH)D concentrations were measured every 3-6 months from birth, ages ranging from 0.3 to 12.2 years (387 subjects, 5334 measurements).
Serum 25(OH)D concentrations were markedly lower before 2003 than after (69.3 ? 1.0 nmol/L vs 84.9 ? 1.3 nmol/L, respectively, P
PubMed ID
25062454 View in PubMed
Less detail

An interdisciplinary knowledge translation intervention in long-term care: study protocol for the vitamin D and osteoporosis study (ViDOS) pilot cluster randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124096
Source
Implement Sci. 2012;7:48
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Courtney C Kennedy
George Ioannidis
Lora M Giangregorio
Jonathan D Adachi
Lehana Thabane
Suzanne N Morin
Richard G Crilly
Sharon Marr
Robert G Josse
Lynne Lohfeld
Laura E Pickard
Susanne King
Mary-Lou van der Horst
Glenda Campbell
Jackie Stroud
Lisa Dolovich
Anna M Sawka
Ravi Jain
Lynn Nash
Alexandra Papaioannou
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1, Canada. kennedyc@hhsc.ca
Source
Implement Sci. 2012;7:48
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bone Density Conservation Agents - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Calcium - administration & dosage
Dietary Supplements
Drug Utilization
Fractures, Bone - prevention & control
Homes for the Aged - organization & administration
Humans
Information Dissemination
Inservice training
Leadership
Long-Term Care - organization & administration
Nursing Homes - organization & administration
Ontario
Osteoporosis - prevention & control
Pilot Projects
Reminder Systems
Translational Medical Research - organization & administration
Vitamin D - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Abstract
Knowledge translation (KT) research in long-term care (LTC) is still in its early stages. This protocol describes the evaluation of a multifaceted, interdisciplinary KT intervention aimed at integrating evidence-based osteoporosis and fracture prevention strategies into LTC care processes.
The Vitamin D and Osteoporosis Study (ViDOS) is underway in 40 LTC homes (n = 19 intervention, n = 21 control) across Ontario, Canada. The primary objectives of this study are to assess the feasibility of delivering the KT intervention, and clinically, to increase the percent of LTC residents prescribed =800 IU of vitamin D daily. Eligibility criteria are LTC homes that are serviced by our partner pharmacy provider and have more than one prescribing physician. The target audience within each LTC home is the Professional Advisory Committee (PAC), an interdisciplinary team who meets quarterly. The key elements of the intervention are three interactive educational sessions led by an expert opinion leader, action planning using a quality improvement cycle, audit and feedback reports, nominated internal champions, and reminders/point-of-care tools. Control homes do not receive any intervention, however both intervention and control homes received educational materials as part of the Ontario Osteoporosis Strategy. Primary outcomes are feasibility measures (recruitment, retention, attendance at educational sessions, action plan items identified and initiated, internal champions identified, performance reports provided and reviewed), and vitamin D (=800 IU/daily) prescribing at 6 and 12 months. Secondary outcomes include the proportion of residents prescribed calcium supplements and osteoporosis medications, and falls and fractures. Qualitative methods will examine the experience of the LTC team with the KT intervention. Homes are centrally randomized to intervention and control groups in blocks of variable size using a computer generated allocation sequence. Randomization is stratified by home size and profit/nonprofit status. Prescribing data retrieval and analysis are performed by blinded personnel.
Our study will contribute to an improved understanding of the feasibility and acceptability of a multifaceted intervention aimed at translating knowledge to LTC practitioners. Lessons learned from this study will be valuable in guiding future research and understanding the complexities of translating knowledge in LTC.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22624776 View in PubMed
Less detail

Are dietary vitamin D, omega-3 fatty acids and folate associated with treatment results in patients with early rheumatoid arthritis? Data from a Swedish population-based prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature290863
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 06 10; 7(6):e016154
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
06-10-2017
Author
Cecilia Lourdudoss
Alicja Wolk
Lena Nise
Lars Alfredsson
Ronald van Vollenhoven
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine Solna, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
BMJ Open. 2017 06 10; 7(6):e016154
Date
06-10-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antirheumatic Agents - therapeutic use
Arthritis, Rheumatoid - drug therapy
Dietary Supplements
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Folic Acid - administration & dosage
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Sweden
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Vitamins - therapeutic use
Abstract
Dietary intake of vitamin D and omega-3 fatty acids (FA) may be associated with superior response to antirheumatic treatments. In addition, dietary folate intake may be associated with worse response to methotrexate (MTX). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between dietary vitamin D, omega-3 FA, folate and treatment results of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA).
This prospective study was based on data from the Epidemiological Investigation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (EIRA) study, and included 727 patients with early RA from 10 hospitals in Sweden. Data on dietary vitamin D, omega-3 FA and folate intake based on food frequency questionnaires were linked with data on European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) response after 3?months of DMARD treatment. Associations between vitamin D, omega-3 FA, folate and EULAR response were analysed with logistic regression adjusted for potential confounders.
The majority of patients (89.9%) were initially treated with MTX monotherapy and more than half (56.9%) with glucocorticoids. Vitamin D and omega-3 FA were associated with good EULAR response (OR 1.80 (95% CI 1.14 to 2.83) and OR 1.60 (95% CI 1.02 to 2.53), respectively). Folate was not significantly associated with EULAR response (OR 1.20 (95% CI 0.75 to 1.91)). Similar results were seen in a subgroup of patients who were initially treated with MTX monotherapy at baseline.
Higher intake of dietary vitamin D and omega-3 FA during the year preceding DMARD initiation may be associated with better treatment results in patients with early RA. Dietary folate intake was not associated with worse or better response to treatment, especially to MTX. Our results suggest that some nutrients may be associated with enhanced treatment results of DMARDs.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28601838 View in PubMed
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Assessing the validity of a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) in the adult population of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114696
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:49
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Lin Liu
Peizhong Peter Wang
Barbara Roebothan
Ann Ryan
Christina Sandra Tucker
Jennifer Colbourne
Natasha Baker
Michelle Cotterchio
Yanqing Yi
Guang Sun
Author Affiliation
Division of Community Health and Humanities, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, 300 Prince Philip Drive, St. John's, NL A1B 3V6, Canada.
Source
Nutr J. 2013;12:49
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Calcium, Dietary - administration & dosage
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Male
Mental Recall
Middle Aged
Newfoundland and Labrador
Nutrition Assessment
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Vitamin A - administration & dosage
Vitamin D - administration & dosage
Abstract
The Food- Frequency Questionnaire (FFQ) is a dietary assessment tool frequently used in large-scale nutritional epidemiology studies. The goal of the present study is to validate a self-administered version of the Hawaii FFQ modified for use in the general adult population of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL).
Over a one year period, 195 randomly selected adults completed four 24-hour dietary recalls (24-HDRs) by telephone and one subsequent self-administered FFQ. Estimates of energy and nutrients derived from the 24-HDRs and FFQs were compared (protein, carbohydrate, fibre, fat, vitamin A, carotene, vitamin D, and calcium). Data were analyzed using the Pearson's correlation coefficients, cross-classification method, and Bland-Altman plots.
The mean nutrient intake values of the 24-HDRs were lower than those of the FFQs, except for protein in men. Sex and energy-adjusted de-attenuated Pearson correlation coefficients for each nutrient varied from 0.13 to 0.61. Except for protein in men, all correlations were statistically significant with p?
Notes
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PubMed ID
23590645 View in PubMed
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