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219 records – page 1 of 22.

Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1967 May 4;129(18):609-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-4-1967
Author
J. Clemmesen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1967 May 4;129(18):609-14
Date
May-4-1967
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Humans
Legislation
Medical Records
Neoplasms
Vital statistics
PubMed ID
5599594 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol Suppl. 1980;54:6-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
1980
Author
L U Lamm
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol Suppl. 1980;54:6-10
Date
1980
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Follow-Up Studies
HLA Antigens - immunology
Histocompatibility testing
Humans
Kidney Transplantation
Registries
Scandinavia
Vital statistics
Abstract
The total number of kidney grafts performed in Scandiatransplant is 3,915 of which 514 are from 1978. The waiting list seems to be stable at approx. 600 patients. The correlation of HLA-A, B matching and graft survival is highly significant. 3rd and 4th grafts have a much lower survival than 1st and 2nd. Overall results have decreased somewhat during the years.
PubMed ID
7013045 View in PubMed
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Address unknown--or at least uncertain.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature206146
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Mar 10;158(5):585-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-10-1998
Author
J J McGurran
Source
CMAJ. 1998 Mar 10;158(5):585-6
Date
Mar-10-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Data Collection - methods
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Newborn
Ontario - epidemiology
Population Surveillance
Vital statistics
Notes
Comment On: CMAJ. 1997 Sep 1;157(5):535-419294392
Comment On: CMAJ. 1997 Sep 1;157(5):549-519294395
PubMed ID
9526467 View in PubMed
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Age-discrepant marriages: cross-national comparisons of Canadian-American trends.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241101
Source
Soc Biol. 1984 Spring-Summer;31(1-2):18-27
Publication Type
Article

Alaska Eskimo and Indian village populations. The social meaning of demographic change.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature1134
Source
Etudes/Inuit/Studies. 1(1):65-92.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1977
Author
Hippler, A.E.
Wood, J.L.
Author Affiliation
University of Alaska Anchorage
Source
Etudes/Inuit/Studies. 1(1):65-92.
Date
1977
Language
English
French
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Demography
Vital statistics
Mortality rates
Urban migration
Abstract
Instead of disappearing, Alaska Eskimo and Indian villages continue to exist, but in a complex and altered form. Using the age/sex curve we find increased numbers of dependent persons in the Native population. Young adults are being attracted to the larger villages, and the smallest villages are most rapidly losing young adults, though they retain large numbers of children. It is suggested that part of the acculturative difficulty facing Alaska Eskimos and Indians is a function of a dramatically altered population structure in which proper childhood socialization is nearly impossible.
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation number 1444.
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Source
Lawrence, KS : Morgan Quitno Corp. v.
Publication Type
Report
Date
1993-2011 (1st-19th)
Author
Morgan, Kathleen O'Leary
Morgan, Scott
Quitno, Neal
Source
Lawrence, KS : Morgan Quitno Corp. v.
Date
1993-2011 (1st-19th)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Report
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Alaska
Statistics
Delivery of Health Care
Health Care Costs
Health Status Indicators
Vital statistics
Notes
ALASKA RA448.5.I5A42625 1st ed. 1973
Less detail
Source
Juneau : Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics. v.
Publication Type
Journal
Source
Juneau : Alaska Bureau of Vital Statistics. v.
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Journal
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
University of Alaska Fairbanks
Keywords
Vital statistics
Notes
UAA - ALASKA RA447.A4A65 (v.1 no.1 (1991)-v.8 no.2 (Winter 2000))
UAF - ALASKA PER ALASKA RA447.A4A65
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Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature229677
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Dec 1;141(11):1155-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1-1989
Author
R B Lowry
N Y Thunem
S. Anderson-Redick
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, University of Calgary, Alta.
Source
CMAJ. 1989 Dec 1;141(11):1155-9
Date
Dec-1-1989
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Congenital Abnormalities - epidemiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Population Surveillance
Prevalence
Registries
Vital statistics
Abstract
The Alberta Congenital Anomalies Surveillance System was started in 1966 in response to the thalidomide tragedy earlier in the decade. It was one of four provincial surveillance systems on which the federal government relied for baseline statistics of congenital anomalies. The government now collects data from six provinces and one territory. The Alberta Congenital Anomaly Surveillance System originally depended on three types of notification to the Division of Vital Statistics, Department of Health, Government of Alberta: birth notice and certificates of death and stillbirth; increased sources of ascertainment have greatly improved data quality. We present the data for 1980-86 and compare the prevalence rates of selected anomalies with the rates from three other surveillance systems. Surveillance systems do not guarantee that a new teratogen will be detected, but they are extremely valuable for testing hypotheses regarding causation. At the very least they provide baseline data with which to compare any deviation or trend. For many, if not most, congenital anomalies total prevention is not possible; however, surveillance systems can be used to measure progress in prevention.
Notes
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1977 Mar;6(1):35-41892967
Cites: Teratology. 1977 Dec;16(3):277-83594911
Cites: Am J Cardiol. 1978 Oct;42(4):641-7696646
Cites: Teratology. 1968 Aug;1(3):263-805759547
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1981 Sep;10(3):247-527287285
Cites: Teratology. 1981 Dec;24(3):277-837330776
Cites: Lancet. 1982 Oct 23;2(8304):9376126782
Cites: Med J Aust. 1983 Aug 20;2(4):189-916877168
Cites: J Epidemiol Community Health. 1984 Dec;38(4):296-3056512482
Cites: Am J Med Genet. 1985 Nov;22(3):545-523840650
Cites: CMAJ. 1987 Jan 15;136(2):109-112947673
Cites: Genet Epidemiol. 1986;3(6):455-673803914
Cites: Clin Orthop Relat Res. 1987 Nov;(224):37-443665254
Cites: CMAJ. 1988 May 1;138(9):819-233282629
Cites: CMAJ. 1989 May 15;140(10):1167-702713802
Comment In: CMAJ. 1990 May 15;142(10):1038-92337839
Erratum In: Can Med Assoc J 1990 Feb 1;142(3):211
PubMed ID
2819634 View in PubMed
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An international comparison study indicated physicians' habits in reporting diabetes in part I of death certificate affected reported national diabetes mortality.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature46973
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Nov;58(11):1150-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2005
Author
Tsung-Hsueh Lu
Sue Walker
Lars Age Johansson
Chien-Ning Huang
Author Affiliation
Institute of Public Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan.
Source
J Clin Epidemiol. 2005 Nov;58(11):1150-7
Date
Nov-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Australia
Cause of Death
Comparative Study
Data Interpretation, Statistical
Death Certificates
Diabetes Mellitus - mortality
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physician's Practice Patterns
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Taiwan
Vital statistics
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Physicians may find it confusing to decide whether to report diagnoses in part I or part II of the death certificate. The aim of this study was to contrast differences in diabetes mortality through a comparison of physicians' habits in reporting diabetes in part I of death certification among Taiwan, Australia, and Sweden. METHODS: A cross-sectional, intercountry comparison study. We calculated the proportion of deaths with mention of diabetes in which diabetes was reported in part I of the death certificate and the proportion of deaths with mention of diabetes in which diabetes was selected as underlying cause of death. RESULTS: We found that half of the differences in reported diabetes mortality among Taiwan, Australia, and Sweden were due to differences in reporting deaths with mention of diabetes anywhere on the certificate, and half due to differences in proportion of deaths with mention of diabetes in which diabetes was reported in part I of the death certificate. CONCLUSION: Differences in the reporting of diabetes in part I of the death certificate among physicians in Taiwan, Australia, and Sweden was one of the factors that affected differing reported diabetes mortality in Taiwan, Australia, and Sweden.
PubMed ID
16223658 View in PubMed
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Apparent truth about congenital diaphragmatic hernia: a population-based database is needed to establish benchmarking for clinical outcomes for CDH.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature180166
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2004 May;39(5):661-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2004
Source
J Pediatr Surg. 2004 May;39(5):661-5
Date
May-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bias (epidemiology)
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Databases, Factual
Hernia, Diaphragmatic - congenital - mortality
Humans
Infant Mortality - trends
Infant, Newborn
Medical Records
Retrospective Studies
Survival Rate
Vital statistics
Abstract
The authors hypothesize that recent single or multiinstitution-based reports of improved survival of congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) patients are biased by patient selection, practice, and referral patterns. Here the authors report a population-based analysis of the clinical outcomes of CDH in the province of Ontario for 1996.
A retrospective analysis of cross-sectional data from the Bureau of Vital Statistics of Ontario and all 5 pediatric surgical institutions in Ontario for 1996 was performed.
Twenty-four CDH-associated deaths were registered in Canada in 1996. Fourteen of 24 occurred in Ontario (58.3%). Of 30 institutionally identified CDH in Ontario, 8 patients died (26.7%). CDH-associated infant mortality rate was 6.6 of 100,000 live births in Canada compared with 10 of 100,000 live births for Ontario (Relative risk, 1.4; confidence interval, 0.5, 3.7; P >.01). Neonatal death (
PubMed ID
15136995 View in PubMed
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219 records – page 1 of 22.