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340 records – page 1 of 34.

A 1-year, placebo-controlled, double-blind house-dust-mite immunotherapy study in asthmatic adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15782
Source
Allergy. 1997 Aug;52(8):853-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1997
Author
O T Olsen
K R Larsen
L. Jacobsan
U G Svendsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Pulmonery Medicine and Allergology, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark.
Source
Allergy. 1997 Aug;52(8):853-9
Date
Aug-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adrenergic beta-Agonists - therapeutic use
Adult
Antigens, Dermatophagoides
Asthma - diagnosis - drug therapy - therapy
Bronchial Provocation Tests
Double-Blind Method
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Glycoproteins - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - analysis - blood - immunology
Immunotherapy
Male
Middle Aged
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Severity of Illness Index
Skin Tests
Steroids - therapeutic use
Vital Capacity
Abstract
Thirty-one adult patients with asthma caused by house-dust mites (HDM) were included in this placebo-controlled, double-blind study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of specific immunotherapy (SIT) with biologically standardized extracts of HDM. The specific diagnosis was confirmed by skin prick tests, specific IgE, and bronchial provocation tests with HDM allergens. The patients were randomized to receive active treatment with extracts of either Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) or D. farinae (Dfa) (Alutard SQ, ALK, Denmark) or placebo injections. Twenty-three patients completed the study. After 1 year of treatment, we found a clinically important and significant reduction in both asthma medicine consumption (inhaled steroids 38% and beta 2-agonists 46%) and symptom score (57%) in the actively treated group, but not the placebo group. These findings were confirmed by a significant decrease in skin and bronchial sensitivity to HDM in the active group. Additionally, there was a significant difference in the patients' scores for effect in favor of the actively treated group. Total IgE and specific IgE to HDM showed no significant changes before and after treatment for either group. Spirometric lung-function measurements showed a significant increase in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) from 85% before to 89% of predicted values after treatment for the actively treated group. Peak-flow measurements at home showed no significant changes during the study. It is concluded that allergen SIT is an effective treatment in adult patients suffering from asthma due to HDM.
PubMed ID
9284985 View in PubMed
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Acculturation and the growth of lung function: three cross-sectional surveys of an Inuit community.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3566
Source
Respiration. 1994;61(4):187-94
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
Author
A. Rode
R J Shephard
Author Affiliation
School of Physical and Health Education, University of Toronto, Ont., Canada.
Source
Respiration. 1994;61(4):187-94
Date
1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adolescent
Adult
Body Composition - physiology
Body Height
Canada
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Inuits
Lung - growth & development - physiology
Male
Maximal Midexpiratory Flow Rate - physiology
Pulmonary Ventilation - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Respiration - physiology
Smoking - physiopathology
Somatotypes
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
The influence of acculturation to a sedentary lifestyle upon the growth and development of lung volumes has been studied in Inuit children aged 9-19 years. Surveys were conducted in the circumpolar community of Igloolik (69 degrees 40'N, 81 degrees W) in 1969/70, 1979/80 and 1989/90. Over this period, the children showed little change of height or body mass at any given age, but a progressive loss of what initially had been a high level of health-related fitness. The sample for each survey comprised about 70% of children in the chosen age range: in the most recent study 87 males and 65 females. Respiratory data included forced vital capacity, one-second forced expiratory volume, maximal mid-expiratory flow rate (second and third surveys only), smoking habits and respiratory health. In each of the 3 surveys, many of the older children in the community were regular smokers. The average cigarette consumption currently rises progressively to 13 +/- 8 cigarettes/day in 87% of males and 11 +/- 7 cigarettes/day in 95% of females over 17 years of age. Nevertheless, lung volumes show the anticipated increase as a logarithmic function of stature. Furthermore, statistically fitted curves show only minor inter-survey differences in volumes for a given standing height. We thus conclude that the deterioration in other aspects of health-related fitness has not yet influenced the growth and development of respiratory function within this Inuit population.
PubMed ID
7973102 View in PubMed
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Acute effects of ambient inhalable particles in asthmatic and nonasthmatic children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature205834
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Apr;157(4 Pt 1):1034-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
S. Vedal
J. Petkau
R. White
J. Blair
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1998 Apr;157(4 Pt 1):1034-43
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects - analysis
Asthma - physiopathology
British Columbia
Child
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Lung Diseases, Obstructive - physiopathology
Male
Meteorological Concepts
Particle Size
Peak Expiratory Flow Rate
Respiratory Mechanics
Vital Capacity
Wood
Abstract
Although increases in inhalable particle (PM10) concentrations have been associated with acute reductions in the level of lung function and increased symptom reporting in children, including children with asthma, it is not clear whether these effects occur largely in asthmatic children, or even whether asthmatic children are more likely to experience these effects than children without asthma. To address these points, the following subgroups of children were selected from a survey population of all 2,200 elementary school children (6 to 13 yr of age) in a pulp mill community on the west coast of Vancouver Island: (1) all children with physician-diagnosed asthma (n = 75 participated), (2) all children with an exercise-induced fall in FEV1 without diagnosed asthma (n = 57), (3) all children with airway obstruction (FEV1/FVC
PubMed ID
9563716 View in PubMed
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Acute effects on forced expiratory volume in one second and longitudinal change in pulmonary function among wood trimmers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218525
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Apr;25(4):551-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1994
Author
M. Dahlqvist
U. Ulfvarson
Author Affiliation
Department of Work Science, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Am J Ind Med. 1994 Apr;25(4):551-8
Date
Apr-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Occupational - adverse effects
Dust - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Forced Expiratory Volume - physiology
Humans
Lung - physiopathology
Lung Diseases, Fungal - physiopathology
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects
Pneumoconiosis - physiopathology
Risk factors
Sweden
Vital Capacity - physiology
Wood
Abstract
Wood trimmers are exposed to molds that periodically grow on timber, and may develop acute as well as chronic pulmonary function impairment. This study examined whether these acute changes in pulmonary function are predictors for a longitudinal deterioration in pulmonary function, beyond normal aging and exposure. Across-shift changes in pulmonary function, measured during a working week, were evaluated in 15 wood trimmers with a follow-up time of 27 months. Twenty-six sawmill workers, employed at the same plants as the wood trimmers, served as control subjects. The highest concentration of viable mold spores for the wood trimmers was 10(6) colony-forming units (cfu)/m3, i.e., several times higher than the corresponding value for the sawmill workers. At the follow-up, wood trimmers had a lower forced vital capacity (FVC) on average, after adjustment for age and height, compared to the sawmill workers. In addition, a correlation was found between the across-week change in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and the decline in FEV1 between the first and the second occasion, after adjusting for normal aging in nonsmoking wood trimmers (r2 = 84%, p
PubMed ID
8010297 View in PubMed
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Adjustments in cardiorespiratory function after pneumonectomy: results of the pneumonectomy project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138536
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011 Jan;141(1):7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Jean Deslauriers
Paula Ugalde
Santiago Miro
Sylvie Ferland
Sébastien Bergeron
Yves Lacasse
Steve Provencher
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Quebec, Canada. jean.deslauriers@chg.ulaval.ca
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011 Jan;141(1):7-15
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Aged
Atrial Function, Right
Blood pressure
Chi-Square Distribution
Dyspnea - etiology - physiopathology
Echocardiography, Doppler
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Heart - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - etiology - physiopathology
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lung - physiopathology - surgery
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Pulmonary Artery - physiopathology
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Gas Exchange
Quebec
Recovery of Function
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Function, Left
Ventricular Function, Right
Vital Capacity
Abstract
To assess lung function, gas exchange, exercise capacity, and right-sided heart hemodynamics, including pulmonary artery pressure, in patients long term after pneumonectomy.
Among 523 consecutive patients who underwent pneumonectomy for lung cancer between January 1992 and September 2001, 117 were alive in 2006 and 100 were included in the study. During a 1-day period, each patient had complete medical history, chest radiographs, pulmonary function studies, resting arterial blood gas analysis, 6-minute walk test, and Doppler echocardiography.
Most patients (N = 73) had no or only minimal dyspnea. On the basis of predicted values, functional losses in forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity were 38% ± 18% and 31% ± 24%, respectively, and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity decreased by 31% ± 18%. There was a significant correlation between preoperative and postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (P
PubMed ID
21168011 View in PubMed
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Adult outcomes of childhood bronchiectasis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature306824
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1731059
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
12-2020
Author
Dawn Sibanda
Rosalyn Singleton
John Clark
Christine Desnoyers
Ellen Hodges
Gretchen Day
Gregory Redding
Author Affiliation
Research Department, Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corporation, Bethel, AK, USA.
Source
Int J Circumpolar Health. 2020 12; 79(1):1731059
Date
12-2020
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Alaska
Alaskan Natives - statistics & numerical data
Bronchiectasis - epidemiology - physiopathology
Child
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Lung Diseases - epidemiology
Male
Prevalence
Recurrence
Respiratory Tract Infections - epidemiology
Vital Capacity
Young Adult
Abstract
Recent literature has highlighted the importance of transition from paediatric to adult care for children with chronic conditions. Non-cystic fibrosis bronchiectasis is an important cause of respiratory morbidity in low-income countries and in indigenous children from affluent countries; however, there is little information about adult outcomes of childhood bronchiectasis. We reviewed the clinical course of 31 Alaska Native adults 20-40 years of age from Alaska's Yukon Kuskokwim Delta with childhood bronchiectasis. In patients with chronic suppurative lung disease, a diagnosis of bronchiectasis was made at a median age of 4.5 years by computerised tomography (68%), bronchogram (26%), and radiographs (6%). The patients had a median of 75 lifetime respiratory ambulatory visits and 4.5 hospitalisations. As children, 6 (19%) experienced developmental delay; as adults 9 (29%) experienced mental illness or handicap. Four (13%) patients were deceased, four (13%) had severe pulmonary impairment in adulthood, 17 (54%) had persistent or intermittent respiratory symptoms, and seven (23%) were asymptomatic. In adulthood, only five were seen by adult pulmonologists and most had no documentation of a bronchiectasis diagnosis. Lack of provider continuity, remote location and co-morbidities can contribute to increased adult morbidity. Improving the transition to adult care starting in adolescence and educating adult providers may improve care of adults with childhood bronchiectasis.
PubMed ID
32090714 View in PubMed
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[Age-related changes in lungs' vital capacity in Ryazan schoolchildren].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature168927
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):61-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
M F Sautkin
G I Stuneeva
V A Kiriushin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2006 Mar-Apr;(2):61-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Aging - physiology
Catchment Area (Health)
Child
Female
Humans
Lung - physiology
Male
Russia
Students
Vital Capacity - physiology
Abstract
The vital capacity in the 11- and 14-year old boys and 11- and 13-year old girls examined in 1996 to 1999 significantly reduced as compared in the children of the same age. The significant increase in the vital capacity in 15-16-old girls examined in 1996-1999 is due to that in their height, as compared with these indices in those examined in 1976 (by 4.64 and 4.87, respectively).
PubMed ID
16758825 View in PubMed
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Aging of lung function. Cross-sectional and longitudinal trends in an Inuit community

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature102159
Source
Pages 233-237 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
1994
, smoking habits, forced vital capacity, one-second forced expiratory volume, and maximal mid-expiratory flow rate have been examined in all willing Inuit aged 9-79 years living in the Arctic community oflgloolik, NWT, Canada (69"N, 8'W) in 1969fi0(1970),1979/80 (1980),and 1989/ 90 (1990). The sample
  1 document  
Author
Rode, A
Shephard, R.J
Author Affiliation
School of Physical and Health Education, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Source
Pages 233-237 in G. Pétursdóttir et al., eds. Circumpolar Health 93. Proceedings of the 9th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Reykjavík, Iceland, June 20-25, 1993. Arctic Medical Research. 1994;53(Suppl.2)
Date
1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Keywords
Age
Cigarette addiction
Females
Forced expiratory volume
Forced vital capacity
Igloolik
Inuit
Lung function
Lung volumes
Males
Pulmonary function
Respiratory health
Smoking
Abstract
Respiratory health, smoking habits, forced vital capacity, one-second forced expiratory volume, and maximal mid-expiratory flow rate have been examined in all willing Inuit aged 9-79 years living in the Arctic community of Igloolik, NWT, Canada (69 degrees N, 81 degrees W) in 1969/70 (1970), 1979/80 (1980), and 1989/90 (1990). The sample comprises about 70% of the children and more than 50% of the adults; in the more recent survey, 219 males and 160 females. Almost all of the adults and many of the children smoke, the current average consumption in those over 17 years of age being 13 plus/minus 7 cigarettes/day in the men and 11 plus/minus 7 cigarettes/day in the women. About a third of the community have radiographically visible chest disease, but with a few exceptions this has had only a minor effect upon pulmonary function. During adolescence, long volumes increase as a logarithmic function of stature; statistically fitted curves predict only minor inter-survey differences for a given height. In adults, multiple regressions on age and height show an increase of cross-sectional aging coefficients from 1970 to 1990, with parallel trends in longitudinal data. Radiographic chest disease and domestic air pollution do not seem the sole cause of the secular trend to accelerated aging. Other possible factors include greater pack-years of cigarette exposure, nonspecific respiratory disease, increased inspiration of cold air, altered chest mechanics due to operation of high-speed snowmobiles, and more general consequences of the secular trend to a loss of physical fitness.
Documents
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Air pollution and health in three urban communities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature246878
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1979 Sep-Oct;34(5):360-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
F. Aubry
G W Gibbs
M R Becklake
Source
Arch Environ Health. 1979 Sep-Oct;34(5):360-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollutants, Occupational - analysis
Closing Volume
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Health
Humans
Male
Maximal Expiratory Flow Rate
Middle Aged
Quebec
Respiratory Function Tests
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology
Smoking
Sulfur Dioxide - analysis
Total lung capacity
Urban health
Vital Capacity
Abstract
A health study was conducted in three communities in the greater Montreal region; the first two were characterized by relatively high particulate and sulfur dioxide levels, respectively, and a third community without major industrial pollution. In each community, 300 men and women 45 to 64 yr of age were studied. Residents of the two more polluted communities exhibited a higher prevalence of respiratory symptoms and mean lung function evaluated by various tests was lower than in residents of the less polluted community. When intercity differences in age and smoking were accounted for, no statistically significant intercity differences in health status could be shown. Given the limitations of this study, the results provide no evidence to suggest that current Canadian standards for sulfur dioxide adequately protect human health as measured by the indices used in the study, for adults in the age range of 45 to 64 yr.
PubMed ID
496434 View in PubMed
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Airway function among Inuit primary school children in far northern Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature3517
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Dec;156(6):1870-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1997
Author
B. Hemmelgarn
P. Ernst
Author Affiliation
Respiratory Epidemiology Unit, McGill University, Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1997 Dec;156(6):1870-5
Date
Dec-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - ethnology
Bronchial Hyperreactivity - ethnology - etiology - physiopathology
Child
Cotinine - analysis
Exertion
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Immediate - diagnosis - ethnology
Infant, Low Birth Weight
Infant, Premature
Inuits
Male
Odds Ratio
Prevalence
Quebec - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Saliva - chemistry
Smoking
Tobacco Smoke Pollution
Vital Capacity
Abstract
The study of the prevalence and determinants of asthma and allergy in different populations may provide clues to their etiology. We describe airway function and its determinants among Inuit schoolchildren living in far Northern Quebec. We assessed the presence of airways hyperresponsiveness (AHR), defined as a 15% drop in FEV1 with exercise, airflow obstruction, as judged by a reduced FEV1/FVC, and atopy, as evidenced by skin test positivity to inhaled aeroallergens, among 509 Inuit aged mostly from 6 to 13 yr. Smoking by the children (31.9%) and their parents was common, including maternal smoking during pregnancy (79.5%). Atopy was found in only 5.3% of children. Apart from age, there were no significant associations between AHR and any of the determinants examined. Airflow obstruction was present among 7.7% of children and occurred most commonly among children with higher levels of salivary cotinine and in those with four or more lower respiratory illnesses in the first 2 yr of life. Asthma and atopy were uncommon in this population whereas evidence of chronic airflow obstruction was frequently found. Measures to reduce the spread of respiratory infection and prevention of smoking are likely to be of most benefit in improving respiratory health in these isolated communities.
PubMed ID
9412568 View in PubMed
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340 records – page 1 of 34.