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71 records – page 1 of 8.

14-year incidence, progression, and visual morbidity of age-related maculopathy: the Copenhagen City Eye Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50573
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 May;112(5):787-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Helena Buch
Niels V Nielsen
Troels Vinding
Gorm B Jensen
Jan U Prause
Morten la Cour
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, National University Hospital (Rigshospitalet), Copenhagen, Denmark. hbh@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 May;112(5):787-98
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Macular Degeneration - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retinal Drusen - epidemiology - physiopathology
Retinitis Pigmentosa - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Vision Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Visual acuity
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM) lesions and the related visual loss. DESIGN: Population-based cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Nine hundred forty-six residents (age range, 60-80 years) of Copenhagen participated in the study from 1986 through 1988. Excluding participants who had died since baseline, 359 persons (97.3% of survivors) were reexamined from 2000 through 2002. METHODS: Participants underwent extensive ophthalmologic examinations. Age-related maculopathy lesions were determined by grading color fundus photographs from the examinations using a modified Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of drusen type and size, pigmentary abnormalities, pure geographic atrophy, exudative ARM, visual impairment, and blindness. RESULTS: The 14-year incidences of early and late ARM were 31.5% and 14.8%, respectively. Individuals 75 to 80 years of age at baseline had significantly (P or =125 microm; 34.2% vs. 12.8%, respectively), soft drusen (45.2% vs. 21.4%), pigmentary abnormalities (31.4% vs. 17.0%), pure geographic atrophy (17.4% vs. 1.0%), and exudative ARM (23.3% vs. 5.7%). Severe drusen type, large drusen, and retinal pigmentary abnormalities at baseline were important predictors of incident late ARM. The 14-year incidences of visual impairment (20/200) or legal blindness from late ARM were 6.0% and 3.4%, respectively. Late ARM caused 35.7% of all visual impairment and 66.7% of all blindness. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high incidence of ARM lesions in this elderly white population. Severe drusen type and size or a combination of drusen and pigmentary abnormalities significantly increases the risk of developing late ARM, the most frequent cause of legal blindness in this population.
PubMed ID
15878058 View in PubMed
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Age-related macular degeneration among the Inuit in Greenland

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature6642
Source
Pages 320-323 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
hopefully al- so contribute to\vards an increased focus on the gro\vlng nun1 ber of individuals vvith visual iinpainnent due to 1\?'vH) an1ong the Inuit. Key vrords: 1\ge-related n1acular degeneration - Visual impairment - Inuit - Cfreenland INTRODUCTION Age-related inacular degeneration (i.'\~i[D) is
  1 document  
Author
Andersen, N
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Rigshospitalet, The University Hospital of Copenhagen, Denmark
Source
Pages 320-323 in J. Lepp�¤luoto, ed. Circumpolar Health 2003. Proceedings of the 12th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Nuuk, Greenland, September 10-14, 2003. International Journal of Circumpolar Health. 2004;63(Suppl.2)
Date
2004
Language
English
Geographic Location
Greenland
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Cross-Sectional Studies
Greenland - epidemiology
Humans
Inuits - statistics & numerical data
Macular degeneration - epidemiology - ethnology
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Visual impairment
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the clinical appearance and prevalence of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD) among the Inuit in Greenland, to investigate risk factors and to initiate the search for possible genetic markers. STUDY DESIGN: A cross-sectional population study including all individuals older than 60 years of age, born in Greenland and living in the communities of Nuuk and Sisimiut, was performed in 2000 and 2001. METHODS: All participants underwent an ophthalmologic examination, which was complemented by fundus photography and a questionnaire. RESULTS: 689 individuals, or more than 70%, participated in the study. Data are currently being processed. The preliminary data suggest that AMD among the Inuit is characterised by a rather uniform morphology and poor visual outcome. The detection of more cases of AMD in the early and late stages in relation to intermediate stages furthermore indicates a rapid development of AMD among the Inuit. CONCLUSION: The relative homogeneity of the Inuit population of Greenland may represent an opportunity for identifying the aetiological factors responsible for the development of AMD. The future results of this research project will hopefully also contribute towards an increased focus on the growing number of individuals with visual impairment due to AMD among the Inuit.
PubMed ID
15736677 View in PubMed
Documents
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An inventory of information on blindness and visual impairment in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194210
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2001 Jun;36(4):175-85; discussion 185-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2001
Author
T K Hameed
W G Hodge
R. Buhrmann
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2001 Jun;36(4):175-85; discussion 185-6
Date
Jun-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Blindness - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Databases, Factual - statistics & numerical data
Health Surveys
Humans
Medical Informatics - organization & administration - statistics & numerical data
Public Health - statistics & numerical data
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Vision, Low - epidemiology
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Several health databases contain information on blindness and visual impairment in Canada. Such databases may permit studies of the outcomes, predictors, economic costs and meta-analysis of ocular health problems and visual disability. In this paper we summarize the existing public health information on blindness and visual impairment in Canada.
A systematic search was performed to find the information in three areas: health administrative databases, health surveys and registries. Both literature searching and Internet searching were performed. The institutions were notified by email or telephone that information pertaining to vision and blindness was desired. When necessary, we visited the institution to obtain the information.
Health administrative databases contain information on a wide cross-section of diagnoses but are usually limited in detail and seldom provide longitudinal information. Health surveys have a limited amount of systematic information on vision-related questions and rely exclusively on self-reporting. Registries exist on a wide range of visual topics. The Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) has the most comprehensive registry.
This is the first attempt at summarizing all the public health information on blindness and visual impairment in Canada. The present population-based ocular information has numerous shortcomings. More comprehensive validation of large registries, such as that of the CNIB, is needed to provide the foundation for a longitudinal ocular surveillance system. Such a system could guide research on risk factors and the effect of treatment, economic analyses, and public policy for ocular research and service allocation.
Notes
Comment In: Can J Ophthalmol. 2001 Jun;36(4):171-211428525
PubMed ID
11428526 View in PubMed
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Association between visual impairment and functional and morphological cerebral abnormalities in full-term children.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature32269
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2001 Apr;79(2):140-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2001
Author
S. Grönqvist
O. Flodmark
K. Tornqvist
G. Edlund
A. Hellström
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Central Hospital, Karlstad, Sweden. sonia.gronqvist@liv.se
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 2001 Apr;79(2):140-6
Date
Apr-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Brain - pathology
Brain Diseases - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Eye Diseases - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Female
Humans
Infant
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - diagnosis - physiopathology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Visual acuity
Visually Impaired Persons
Abstract
PURPOSE: To characterise the nature and degree of ocular disorders and cerebral morphological and functional abnormalities in a population-based group of visually impaired full-term pre-school children. METHODS: Forty-five children who were born at full-term between 1989 and 1995 in Värmland, Sweden, were reported as being visually impaired. An ophthalmological examination was performed and clinical data regarding mental development and neurological disease were obtained for all children. Cerebral imaging was performed in 35 children. RESULTS: Twenty-six per cent of the children were found to have ocular disorders only. Forty-two per cent had cerebral morphological abnormalities, verified by cerebral imaging, and 65% had signs of cerebral functional abnormalities. In total, 74% were found to have cerebral morphological and/or cerebral functional abnormalities. CONCLUSION: The majority of children with visual impairment, including children with ocular disorders, were found to have cerebral morphological and/or cerebral functional abnormalities. We suggest that any child with visual impairment should therefore undergo cerebral imaging and be examined by a paediatrician in order to establish the correct diagnosis.
PubMed ID
11284751 View in PubMed
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Blindness registrations and socioeconomic factors in Canada: an ecologic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178364
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2004 Jul;11(3):199-211
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Arthur J Sit
Mary Chipman
Graham E Trope
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada.
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2004 Jul;11(3):199-211
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Blindness - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Continental Population Groups - statistics & numerical data
Ecology
Female
Humans
Male
Multivariate Analysis
Prevalence
Registries - statistics & numerical data
Socioeconomic Factors
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
To investigate the socioeconomic factors associated with blindness registration in Canada and its regions using an ecologic approach.
Canadian National Institute for the Blind (CNIB) blindness registration data for 1996 were divided into units of analysis using postal codes and correlated with demographic and socioeconomic information collected by the 1996 Census of Canada. A total of 1250 units were analyzed representing 28,429,519 persons (98.55% of the population of Canada). Six socioeconomic factors were examined using weighted linear multivariate regression analysis: I) Percentage of the population aged 65 years and over; 2) Median household income; 3) Percentage of the population with university education; 4) Percentage of income derived from government transfer payments; 5) Recent immigrants; and 6) Visible minorities (blacks, Chinese, South Asians). Regression models were created for Canada as well as five geographic regions within Canada.
For Canada as a whole, blindness registration prevalence was positively correlated with age distribution and percentage of recent immigrants, and negatively correlated with level of government assistance income and percentage ethnic Chinese population. For five regional regression models, the common predictor variables were age distribution, median household income and percentage of the population who are black. None of the regional models produced an identical set of correlations.
Socioeconomic factors associated with blindness registration prevalence varied across different regions. Median household income was the second most common factor after age distribution, suggesting that areas with lower incomes tend to utilize more blind services. Higher blindness registration rates were associated with areas that had a higher percentage of the population who were black. Differences in blindness registration rates may reflect under-utilization of blind services and/or variations in disease and treatment rates in different populations.
PubMed ID
15370552 View in PubMed
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Canadian blind sport: participation and excellence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141797
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2010 Aug;45(4):322-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010

A Canadian population-based study of vision problems: assessing the significance of socioeconomic status.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141386
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2010 Oct;45(5):477-83
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Anthony V Perruccio
Elizabeth M Badley
Graham E Trope
Author Affiliation
Toronto Western Research Institute, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Toronto, Ont. perrucci@uhnres.utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2010 Oct;45(5):477-83
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Distribution
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Canada - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Income - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Sex Distribution
Social Class
Vision Disorders - epidemiology
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the relationship between age, gender, socioeconomic status, and 3 chronic conditions (glaucoma, cataracts, and diabetes) and corrected and uncorrected vision problems, and to document the prevalence of visual problems in Canada across the adult age range.
Cross-sectional, representative, population-based study.
Health survey respondents (n = 113 212, aged =20 years).
Data are from a 2000-2001 Canadian health survey. Self-reported data included sociodemographic/economic characteristics, vision problems, eye care professional consultations, and medical conditions. Prevalence estimates were calculated; multinomial logistic regression examined the relationship between indicated variables and vision problems, generally and by type.
Fifty-seven percent of adults reported some form of vision problem, the majority corrected by lenses. Blindness was reported by 0.09% of adults. Increasing age, being female, and having a low income and lower educational attainment were significantly associated with reported vision problems. However, age and gender were not significant determinants of the type of vision problem. Cataracts, diabetes, and glaucoma in particular, were significantly associated with reported vision problems.
Socioeconomic characteristics may underscore the socioeconomic burden of visual impairments in the population and highlight obstacles to eye service utilization among subgroups. This information is essential to establishing the need for treatment and management services, developing targeted screening programmes, and identifying priority areas of research.
PubMed ID
20729934 View in PubMed
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Clinical report: use of the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure in vision technology.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature171029
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2005 Dec;72(5):309-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2005
Author
Linda S Petty
Laurie McArthur
Jutta Treviranus
Author Affiliation
Adaptive Technology Resource Centre, University of Toronto, ON. linda.petty@utoronto.ca
Source
Can J Occup Ther. 2005 Dec;72(5):309-12
Date
Dec-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Canada
Disability Evaluation
Humans
Occupational therapy
Self-Assessment
Visually Impaired Persons - rehabilitation
Abstract
The Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) has gained wide acceptance in general occupational therapy research and practice, however, the use of the COPM in assistive technology assessments and outcomes is not as well documented.
This clinical report discusses the utility of the COPM in assistive technology, as illustrated by the assessment and follow-up of clients requiring high technology vision aids.
The COPM makes important contributions to the outcomes of providing vision aids. The COPM ensures a needs review that incorporates all areas of occupational performance, which in turn directs the clinician to match the technology to client needs. From a clinical perspective, the quantitative follow-up data are helpful to determine clients' improvement in occupational performance as well as their satisfaction with the assistive technology. For administrative purposes, the COPM results provides accountability to the funding agency.
The COPM can be readily integrated into the assessment and follow-up of assistive technology service delivery and adds value to both components of the process.
PubMed ID
16435592 View in PubMed
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Correctable visual impairment and its impact on quality of life in a marginalized Canadian neighbourhood.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature152970
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Feb;44(1):42-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Hussein Hollands
Anya C Brox
Angela Chang
Steve Adilman
Bubli Chakraborti
Gordon Kliever
David A L Maberley
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Queen's University, Kingston, Ont.
Source
Can J Ophthalmol. 2009 Feb;44(1):42-8
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Activities of Daily Living
Blindness - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
British Columbia - epidemiology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Services Research
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Poverty
Prevalence
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Sickness Impact Profile
Urban Population - statistics & numerical data
Vision, Low - epidemiology - psychology - therapy
Visual acuity
Visually Impaired Persons - psychology
Abstract
To study the impact of visual impairment due to either underlying ocular pathology or easily correctable refractive error on vision-related functioning and quality of life (QOL) in Vancouver's downtown eastside (VDES).
Cross-sectional study.
Two hundred consecutive patients seeking general medical care at the Vancouver Native Health Society (VNHS) medical clinic were included.
An ocular examination was performed and a standardized history and QOL information were obtained for each participant. Effective visual impairment was classified based on patients' current refractive means. Pathological visual impairment was classified based on patients' best-corrected visual acuity (VA). Vision-related functioning was quantified using the Daily Tasks Dependent on Vision (DTDV) questionnaire. Health-related QOL was assessed using the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-12).
Two hundred patients participated; they suffered, on average, 6.2 comorbid conditions. Sixty-two patients (31%) were effectively visually impaired and, of these, 14 patients (7%) were effectively blind. Ten patients (5%) had pathological eye disease to explain their visual impairment. The remaining 52 visually impaired patients (26%) had VA that normalized with correction. Difficulty with the tasks described in the DTDV questions was significantly correlated with effective visual impairment. Patients with effective visual impairment had lower Physical Composite Scores on the SF-12 in multivariate analyses.
We have demonstrated a very high rate of visual impairment in a low socioeconomic population that is associated with decreased vision-dependent functioning and decreased overall physical health status. Public health efforts need to be directed toward improving easily correctable refractive error.
PubMed ID
19169312 View in PubMed
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Danish Rural Eye Study: Epidemiology of Adult Visual Impairment.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature275555
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2016;23(1):53-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Tracy Beth Høeg
Christina Ellervik
Helena Buch
Morten La Cour
Kristian Klemp
Jan Kvetny
Ditte Erngaard
Birgitte Moldow
Source
Ophthalmic Epidemiol. 2016;23(1):53-62
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Vision Disorders - epidemiology
Visual acuity
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
To examine the frequency and causes of visual impairment (VI) in a select population of Danish adults.
A total of 3843 adults aged 20-94 years from the Danish General Suburban Population Study (GESUS) were included in the population-based, cross-sectional ophthalmological study, Danish Rural Eye Study (DRES). All DRES participants received a comprehensive general health examination preceding their eye examination, including measurement of best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) for each eye, bilateral 45° retinal fundus photographs and further ophthalmological examination where indicated.
Overall, 3826 of 3843 participants (99.6%) had bilateral visual acuity measurements. The overall frequency of VI (BCVA 50 years and 3.7% (95% CI 2.1-6.5%; n = 11) in participants >80 years. The primary causes of VI in the better-seeing eye were age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in 46.7% (7/15) and cataract in 26.7% (4/15). A total of 43.3% (n = 115) of participants >80 years were pseudophakic in one or both eyes. The frequency of diabetes (HbA1c = 48 mmol/mol or self-reported diagnosis) was 5.9% (n = 227), including 1.3% (n = 51) newly diagnosed in the GESUS. Of participants determined to have VI due to exudative AMD, 50% had received anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) treatment.
We report a relatively low frequency of VI among Danish adults over 59 years of age compared with that observed 10-15 years ago, which is both consistent with other recent Scandinavian studies and reflective of our relatively healthy and mobile population sample.
PubMed ID
26825126 View in PubMed
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71 records – page 1 of 8.