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645 records – page 1 of 65.

3M diffractive multifocal intraocular lens: eight year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50890
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000 Mar;26(3):402-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2000
Author
J E Slagsvold
Author Affiliation
Eye Department, ASA, Arendal, Norway.
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2000 Mar;26(3):402-7
Date
Mar-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aphakia, Postcataract - surgery
Capsulorhexis
Comparative Study
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lens Implantation, Intraocular
Lenses, Intraocular
Phacoemulsification
Polymethyl Methacrylate
Postoperative Complications
Prosthesis Design
Refraction, Ocular
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Treatment Outcome
Visual acuity
Abstract
PURPOSE: To study the long-term results of implantation of the 3M diffractive multifocal intraocular lens (IOL). SETTING: Eye Department, ASA, Arendal, Norway. METHODS: The study comprised 97 eyes in 72 patients. Follow-up was 8 years. Distance and near visual acuities, refractive results, contrast sensitivity, IOL centration, and neodymium:YAG (Nd:YAG) capsulotomies to treat posterior capsule opacification were evaluated. RESULTS: All patients without ocular pathology achieved a best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of 0.5 or better (i.e., 98.7% had a BCVA of 1.0 or better). Without correction, 73.8% of eyes had a Jaeger acuity of J3 or better and with distance correction, 92.1%. Emmetropia or within +/-0.25 diopter (D) of it was achieved in 58.8% of eyes. An astigmatic shift of 0.827 D cylinder correction was induced. This shift was mainly against the rule (0.717 D). Contrast sensitivity was reduced with spatial frequencies of 6 to 18 cycles per degree. No need for spectacles was reported by 54.2% of patients and by 68.0% of those with bilateral implantation. For near tasks, 63.9% of patients never used spectacles. The IOLs were well centered or minimally decentered in 99.0% of eyes. Posterior capsule opacification was treated by Nd:YAG laser capsulotomy in 55.7% of eyes, with a mean time between surgery and treatment of 34.0 months +/- 23.2 (SD). CONCLUSION: This long-term study proved the 3M diffractive IOL to be safe and effective despite some reduction in contrast sensitivity at higher spatial frequencies. More than half the patients never wore spectacles; 2 of 3 patients with IOLs in both eyes never wore spectacles. Proper patient selection is crucial.
PubMed ID
10713237 View in PubMed
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14-year incidence, progression, and visual morbidity of age-related maculopathy: the Copenhagen City Eye Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50573
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 May;112(5):787-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Helena Buch
Niels V Nielsen
Troels Vinding
Gorm B Jensen
Jan U Prause
Morten la Cour
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, National University Hospital (Rigshospitalet), Copenhagen, Denmark. hbh@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 May;112(5):787-98
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Macular Degeneration - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retinal Drusen - epidemiology - physiopathology
Retinitis Pigmentosa - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Vision Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Visual acuity
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM) lesions and the related visual loss. DESIGN: Population-based cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Nine hundred forty-six residents (age range, 60-80 years) of Copenhagen participated in the study from 1986 through 1988. Excluding participants who had died since baseline, 359 persons (97.3% of survivors) were reexamined from 2000 through 2002. METHODS: Participants underwent extensive ophthalmologic examinations. Age-related maculopathy lesions were determined by grading color fundus photographs from the examinations using a modified Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of drusen type and size, pigmentary abnormalities, pure geographic atrophy, exudative ARM, visual impairment, and blindness. RESULTS: The 14-year incidences of early and late ARM were 31.5% and 14.8%, respectively. Individuals 75 to 80 years of age at baseline had significantly (P or =125 microm; 34.2% vs. 12.8%, respectively), soft drusen (45.2% vs. 21.4%), pigmentary abnormalities (31.4% vs. 17.0%), pure geographic atrophy (17.4% vs. 1.0%), and exudative ARM (23.3% vs. 5.7%). Severe drusen type, large drusen, and retinal pigmentary abnormalities at baseline were important predictors of incident late ARM. The 14-year incidences of visual impairment (20/200) or legal blindness from late ARM were 6.0% and 3.4%, respectively. Late ARM caused 35.7% of all visual impairment and 66.7% of all blindness. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high incidence of ARM lesions in this elderly white population. Severe drusen type and size or a combination of drusen and pigmentary abnormalities significantly increases the risk of developing late ARM, the most frequent cause of legal blindness in this population.
PubMed ID
15878058 View in PubMed
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20th annual Frank Costenbader Lecture--adult strabismus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213945
Source
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 1995 Nov-Dec;32(6):348-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
W E Scott
P J Kutschke
W R Lee
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, USA.
Source
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 1995 Nov-Dec;32(6):348-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Awards and Prizes
British Columbia
Child
Diplopia - physiopathology
Humans
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Strabismus - physiopathology - surgery
Vision, Binocular
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
A retrospective analysis of adults with strabismus was done to examine the potential risks and the possible benefits of surgical treatment and to describe the types of adult strabismus.
Eight hundred ninety-two patients were analyzed. Age at time of surgery ranged from 9 years to 89 years. The average follow up was 34 months. Major types of strabismus were grouped by their original diagnoses. The group of patients with horizontal strabismus, which usually had an onset before 9, was termed the before visual maturity (BVM) group. The group of patients with paretic or restrictive strabismus usually had the onset of strabismus after age 9 and was termed the after visual maturity (AVM) group.
Patients with adult strabismus can gain restoration of alignment, as well as binocular function. At the last postoperative visit, 74% of the BVM group were aligned within 15 prism diopters. Not only was restoration of alignment accomplished, many of them gained some degree of sensory fusion as measured by the Worth 4-Dot (W4D) or Titmus stereoacuity. Twenty-nine percent of patients with congenital esotropia had some sensory fusion. The other subtypes in the BVM group had even higher percentages of patients with postoperative stereoacuity. In the AVM group, 92% had fusion at the last postoperative visit.
The outcomes of adult strabismics in our study show that certain benefits can be gained from correction of ocular alignment. Restoration of alignment, elimination of diplopia and sensory fusion are functional benefits that can be obtained through strabismus surgery in the adult patient. It is clear that adult strabismus is more than just a cosmetic problem and treatment is worthwhile.
PubMed ID
8587016 View in PubMed
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[100,000 operations in the cataract registry. Outcome and benefit is followed-up as a next step]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51118
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Feb 22;92(8):748-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-22-1995
Author
M. Lundström
U. Stenevi
W. Thorburn
Author Affiliation
Ogonkliniken, Centrallasarettet, Karlskrona.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 Feb 22;92(8):748-50
Date
Feb-22-1995
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cataract Extraction - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Male
Prognosis
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Visual acuity
Waiting Lists
PubMed ID
7869796 View in PubMed
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200 Hz flying-spot technology of the LaserSight LSX excimer laser in the treatment of myopic astigmatism: six and 12 month outcomes of laser in situ keratomileusis and photorefractive keratectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50810
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2001 Aug;27(8):1263-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
A. Stojanovic
T A Nitter
Author Affiliation
SynsLaser Clinic, Tromsø, Norway. aleks@online.no
Source
J Cataract Refract Surg. 2001 Aug;27(8):1263-77
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Astigmatism - surgery
Comparative Study
Cornea - surgery
Female
Humans
Keratectomy, Photorefractive, Excimer Laser - methods
Keratomileusis, Laser In Situ - methods
Male
Middle Aged
Myopia - surgery
Refraction, Ocular
Retrospective Studies
Safety
Treatment Outcome
Visual acuity
Abstract
PURPOSE: To evaluate safety, efficacy, predictability, and stability in the treatment of myopic astigmatism with laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) using the 200 Hz flying-spot technology of the LaserSight LSX excimer laser. SETTING: SynsLaser Clinic, Tromsø, Norway. METHODS: This retrospective study included 110 eyes treated with LASIK and 87 eyes treated with PRK that were available for evaluation at 6 and 12 months, respectively. The mean preoperative spherical equivalent (SE) was -5.35 diopters (D) +/- 2.50 (SD) (range -1.13 to -11.88 D) in the LASIK eyes and -4.72 +/- 2.82 D (range -1.00 to -15.50 D) in the PRK eyes. The treated cylinder was 4.00 D in both groups. Eleven (8.5%) LASIK eyes and 8 (7.4%) PRK eyes had secondary surgical procedures before 6 and 12 months, respectively, and were excluded when the 6 and 12 month outcomes were analyzed. RESULTS: None of the eyes lost 2 or more lines of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity. Seventy-seven percent of the LASIK eyes and 78% of the PRK eyes achieved an uncorrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better; 98% in both groups achieved 20/40 or better. The SE was within +/-0.5 D of the desired refraction in 83% of the LASIK eyes and 77% of the PRK eyes; it was within +/-1.0 D in 97% and 98%, respectively. The cylinder correction had a mean magnitude of error of 0.04 +/- 0.31 D (range -0.96 to +0.85 D) in the LASIK eyes and 0.02 +/- 0.37 D (range -1.44 to +0.72 D) in the PRK eyes. Refractive stability was achieved at 1 month and beyond in the LASIK eyes and at 3 months and beyond in the PRK eyes. CONCLUSION: The outcomes of this study are comparable to those achieved with lasers that use small-beam technology with a lower frequency, as well as with other types of delivery systems. They suggest that the 200 Hz technology used in the LaserSight LSX excimer laser is safe, effective, and predictable and that with LASIK and PRK the results are stable when treating low to moderate myopia and astigmatism up to 4.0 D.
PubMed ID
11524200 View in PubMed
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Abnormalities of cornea, lens and retina. Survey findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2704
Source
Canadian Journal of Opthalmology. 1973 Apr;8(2):291-297.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973
Author
Wyatt, H.T.
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta
Source
Canadian Journal of Opthalmology. 1973 Apr;8(2):291-297.
Date
1973
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Corneal scarring
Labrador keratopathy
Pterygium
Degenerative retinal disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cataract - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cornea
European Continental Ancestry Group
Eye Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Lens, Crystalline
Middle Aged
Retinal Diseases - epidemiology
Vision
Visual acuity
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation 2521.
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Accommodation and convergence in 10-year-old prematurely born and full-term children: a population-based study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121456
Source
Strabismus. 2012 Sep;20(3):127-32
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Eva Larsson
Agneta Rydberg
Gerd Holmström
Author Affiliation
Department of Neuroscience/Ophthalmology, Uppsala University, Uppsala. eva.larsson@neuro.uu.se
Source
Strabismus. 2012 Sep;20(3):127-32
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Accommodation, Ocular
Child
Child, Preschool
Convergence, Ocular
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Premature
Male
Population Surveillance
Prospective Studies
Retinopathy of Prematurity - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Strabismus - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Sweden - epidemiology
Time Factors
Visual acuity
Abstract
To examine the accommodative amplitude and convergence in 10-year-old prematurely born children previously screened for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) and to compare with full-term controls of the same age.
Two-hundred and thirteen prematurely born and 217 children born at term were included. Accommodative amplitude and near-point convergence were assessed, together with best-corrected visual acuity (VA). A questionnaire was answered regarding possible problems at school.
Binocular accommodation (P = 0.03) and convergence (P = 0.003) were significantly poorer in prematurely born children. Accommodation was correlated to neurological findings in the preterm group, but not to the degree of prematurity or stage of ROP. Regarding convergence there were no correlations to neurology, stage of ROP, or degree of prematurity. For neither accommodation nor convergence were any correlations with distance and near VA found. Preterm children had a higher prevalence of school problems, and there was an association with poor accommodation.
Prematurely born children had poorer accommodation and convergence than full-term children, but no association with near VA was found. The reduction of accommodative amplitude and convergence was small and was probably of little clinical significance. However, it may have additional effects on other ophthalmological problems and school problems in the preterm group.
PubMed ID
22906384 View in PubMed
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The achiasmia spectrum: congenitally reduced chiasmal decussation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature29468
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2005 Oct;89(10):1311-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
D A Sami
D. Saunders
D A Thompson
I M Russell-Eggitt
K K Nischal
G. Jeffrey
G. Jeffery
M. Dattani
R A Clement
A. Liasis
A. Liassis
D S Taylor
Author Affiliation
Visual Sciences Unit, Institute of Child Health University College, London WC1N 1EH, UK.
Source
Br J Ophthalmol. 2005 Oct;89(10):1311-7
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abnormalities, Multiple
Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Corpus Callosum - abnormalities
Encephalocele - physiopathology
Evoked Potentials, Visual
Eye Movements
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Optic Chiasm - abnormalities - pathology
Retrospective Studies
Skull Base - abnormalities
Visual acuity
Visual Fields
Abstract
AIM: To describe the clinical spectrum of achiasmia, a congenital disorder of reduced relative decussation at the optic chiasm. METHODS: A retrospective case note and patient review of nine children (four boys). Achiasmia was defined by the combination of a characteristic asymmetry of the monocular visual evoked potential (VEP) response to flash and neuroimaging showing reduced chiasmal size. RESULTS: Three of the children had an associated skull base encephalocele with agenesis of the corpus callosum. In two patients achiasmia was associated with septo-optic dysplasia. Three patients had no neuroimaging abnormalities other than reduced chiasmal size and have no known pituitary dysfunction. One child had multiple physical deformities but the only brain imaging abnormality was reduced chiasmal size. CONCLUSIONS: Some children with disorders of midline central nervous system development, including septo-optic dysplasia and skull base encephaloceles, have congenitally reduced chiasmal decussation. Reduced relative decussation may co-exist with overall chiasmal hypoplasia. Children with an apparently isolated chiasmal decussation deficit may have other subtle neurological findings, but our clinical impression is that most of these children function well.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Ophthalmol. 2006 Jan;90(1):125Jeffery, G [corrected to Jeffrey, G]; Liassis, A [corrected to Liasis, A]
PubMed ID
16170123 View in PubMed
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[A congenital anomaly of the crystalline lens erroneously related to radiation exposure]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51188
Source
Voen Med Zh. 1993 Dec;(12):34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1993

Active prevention in diabetic eye disease. A 4-year follow-up.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature34240
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1997 Jun;75(3):249-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1997
Author
J K Kristinsson
H. Hauksdóttir
E. Stefánsson
F. Jónasson
I. Gíslason
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, Landakotsspítali, University of Iceland, Reykjavík.
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Scand. 1997 Jun;75(3):249-54
Date
Jun-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age of Onset
Aged
Blindness - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications
Diabetic Retinopathy - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Iceland - epidemiology
Incidence
Macular Edema, Cystoid - complications - epidemiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vision Screening
Visual acuity
Abstract
Ten years after the foundation of a national diabetic eye screening program in 1980, we have established a low prevalence of blindness and partial sight in type 1 and type 2 diabetics in Iceland. We ask whether the screening program is also associated with a low incidence of blindness in diabetics. We now report the results of a prospective study on the 4-year incidence of diabetic retinopathy and visual impairment in type 1 diabetics with age at onset less than 30 years. Out of 205 patients participating at baseline, 175 patients (85.4%) participated over the full 4-year period. Patients were examined annually and received laser treatment according to Diabetic- and Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study criteria. The 4-year incidence of any retinopathy was 38.1%, of proliferative retinopathy 6.6%, and of macular edema 3.4%. Out of 174 patients, 7.4% showed improvement in visual acuity of 2 Snellen lines while 2.5% experienced worsening of visual acuity of 2 Snellen lines during the 4-year period. No diabetic suffered more than 2 lines deterioration of vision and none became legally blind. The incidence of retinopathy in Icelandic type 1 diabetics participating in our annual eye screening program is low and the visual acuity stable. Our results suggest that visual impairment in diabetics can be prevented with active regular screening and standard laser therapy.
PubMed ID
9253967 View in PubMed
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645 records – page 1 of 65.