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856 records – page 1 of 86.

14-year incidence, progression, and visual morbidity of age-related maculopathy: the Copenhagen City Eye Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature50573
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 May;112(5):787-98
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2005
Author
Helena Buch
Niels V Nielsen
Troels Vinding
Gorm B Jensen
Jan U Prause
Morten la Cour
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, National University Hospital (Rigshospitalet), Copenhagen, Denmark. hbh@dadlnet.dk
Source
Ophthalmology. 2005 May;112(5):787-98
Date
May-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Progression
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Macular Degeneration - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retinal Drusen - epidemiology - physiopathology
Retinitis Pigmentosa - epidemiology - physiopathology
Risk factors
Vision Disorders - epidemiology - physiopathology
Visual acuity
Visually Impaired Persons - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
PURPOSE: To describe the 14-year incidence of age-related maculopathy (ARM) lesions and the related visual loss. DESIGN: Population-based cohort study. PARTICIPANTS: Nine hundred forty-six residents (age range, 60-80 years) of Copenhagen participated in the study from 1986 through 1988. Excluding participants who had died since baseline, 359 persons (97.3% of survivors) were reexamined from 2000 through 2002. METHODS: Participants underwent extensive ophthalmologic examinations. Age-related maculopathy lesions were determined by grading color fundus photographs from the examinations using a modified Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Incidence of drusen type and size, pigmentary abnormalities, pure geographic atrophy, exudative ARM, visual impairment, and blindness. RESULTS: The 14-year incidences of early and late ARM were 31.5% and 14.8%, respectively. Individuals 75 to 80 years of age at baseline had significantly (P or =125 microm; 34.2% vs. 12.8%, respectively), soft drusen (45.2% vs. 21.4%), pigmentary abnormalities (31.4% vs. 17.0%), pure geographic atrophy (17.4% vs. 1.0%), and exudative ARM (23.3% vs. 5.7%). Severe drusen type, large drusen, and retinal pigmentary abnormalities at baseline were important predictors of incident late ARM. The 14-year incidences of visual impairment (20/200) or legal blindness from late ARM were 6.0% and 3.4%, respectively. Late ARM caused 35.7% of all visual impairment and 66.7% of all blindness. CONCLUSIONS: There is a high incidence of ARM lesions in this elderly white population. Severe drusen type and size or a combination of drusen and pigmentary abnormalities significantly increases the risk of developing late ARM, the most frequent cause of legal blindness in this population.
PubMed ID
15878058 View in PubMed
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20th annual Frank Costenbader Lecture--adult strabismus.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature213945
Source
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 1995 Nov-Dec;32(6):348-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
W E Scott
P J Kutschke
W R Lee
Author Affiliation
Department of Ophthalmology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, USA.
Source
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 1995 Nov-Dec;32(6):348-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Awards and Prizes
British Columbia
Child
Diplopia - physiopathology
Humans
Middle Aged
Ophthalmology
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Societies, Medical
Strabismus - physiopathology - surgery
Vision, Binocular
Visual Acuity - physiology
Abstract
A retrospective analysis of adults with strabismus was done to examine the potential risks and the possible benefits of surgical treatment and to describe the types of adult strabismus.
Eight hundred ninety-two patients were analyzed. Age at time of surgery ranged from 9 years to 89 years. The average follow up was 34 months. Major types of strabismus were grouped by their original diagnoses. The group of patients with horizontal strabismus, which usually had an onset before 9, was termed the before visual maturity (BVM) group. The group of patients with paretic or restrictive strabismus usually had the onset of strabismus after age 9 and was termed the after visual maturity (AVM) group.
Patients with adult strabismus can gain restoration of alignment, as well as binocular function. At the last postoperative visit, 74% of the BVM group were aligned within 15 prism diopters. Not only was restoration of alignment accomplished, many of them gained some degree of sensory fusion as measured by the Worth 4-Dot (W4D) or Titmus stereoacuity. Twenty-nine percent of patients with congenital esotropia had some sensory fusion. The other subtypes in the BVM group had even higher percentages of patients with postoperative stereoacuity. In the AVM group, 92% had fusion at the last postoperative visit.
The outcomes of adult strabismics in our study show that certain benefits can be gained from correction of ocular alignment. Restoration of alignment, elimination of diplopia and sensory fusion are functional benefits that can be obtained through strabismus surgery in the adult patient. It is clear that adult strabismus is more than just a cosmetic problem and treatment is worthwhile.
PubMed ID
8587016 View in PubMed
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27. meeting of Nordic Ophthalmologists. Proceedings. Arhus, Denmark, June 2-5, 1985.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature51409
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Suppl. 1985;173:1-110
Publication Type
Article
Date
1985
Source
Acta Ophthalmol Suppl. 1985;173:1-110
Date
1985
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Eye diseases
Humans
Vision Disorders
PubMed ID
3002088 View in PubMed
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Abnormalities of cornea, lens and retina. Survey findings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature2704
Source
Canadian Journal of Opthalmology. 1973 Apr;8(2):291-297.
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973
Author
Wyatt, H.T.
Author Affiliation
University of Alberta
Source
Canadian Journal of Opthalmology. 1973 Apr;8(2):291-297.
Date
1973
Language
English
Geographic Location
Canada
Publication Type
Article
Physical Holding
Alaska Medical Library
Keywords
Corneal scarring
Labrador keratopathy
Pterygium
Degenerative retinal disease
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Arctic Regions
Canada
Cataract - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Cornea
European Continental Ancestry Group
Eye Diseases - epidemiology - pathology
Humans
Indians, North American
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Inuits
Lens, Crystalline
Middle Aged
Retinal Diseases - epidemiology
Vision
Visual acuity
Notes
From: Fortuine, Robert et al. 1993. The Health of the Inuit of North America: A Bibliography from the Earliest Times through 1990. University of Alaska Anchorage. Citation 2521.
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About stereopsis and its significance to public health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248094
Source
Can J Public Health. 1978 Nov-Dec;69 Suppl 1:75-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
W L Larson
Source
Can J Public Health. 1978 Nov-Dec;69 Suppl 1:75-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Depth Perception
Humans
Public Health
Vision Disorders
Visual perception
PubMed ID
737662 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2011 Nov-Dec;127(6):46-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
V L Fomina
O V Paramei
A R Tumasian
I E Khatsenko
Source
Vestn Oftalmol. 2011 Nov-Dec;127(6):46-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child
Color Vision Defects - congenital - diagnosis - therapy
Humans
Male
Russia
Abstract
A case of rare genetic disease rod monochromasia which is often called total congenital cone dysfunction (syn. congenital cone dystrophy, congenital achromatopsia) is presented. Symptoms and signs of the disease are described in details and methods for improvement of patient's condition are indicated.
PubMed ID
22442995 View in PubMed
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Acquired ocular visual impairment in children. 1960-1989.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature221590
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Mar;147(3):325-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1993
Author
G C Robinson
J E Jan
Author Affiliation
Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
Source
Am J Dis Child. 1993 Mar;147(3):325-8
Date
Mar-1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
British Columbia - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Comorbidity
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Time Factors
Vision Disorders - classification - epidemiology - etiology
Vision Screening
Abstract
To describe the causes, sites, and types of eye anomaly and associated handicaps in children identified in the last 30 years with ocular visual impairment of 20/200 (6/60) or worse in the better eye with correction.
Trend study.
Children in British Columbia younger than 19 years with visual loss diagnosed between January 1960 and December 1989 who were referred for multidisciplinary assessment.
The incidence of acquired ocular visual impairment has decreased from 0.6 to less than 0.2 per 10,000 people aged 19 years or younger during the last 30 years. The most common cause was a genetic cause, followed by tumor, injury, infection and autoimmune disorders. Optic nerve atrophy and retinal disorders together resulted in more than 90% of all ocular lesions. Gender distribution revealed more males than females to be affected. Sixty-six percent of children had enough sight to read. The percentage of affected children with neurologic disabilities has increased overall in the last 30 years because more children with profound brain damage have survived.
Acquired ocular visual impairment is rare. The incidence of such impairment has been reduced by two thirds in the last 30 years. This decline has had little impact, however, because most cases of blindness are due to congenital conditions. The number of cases of acquired blindness is only one fourth that of congenital blindness, which has begun to increase again owing to the reemergence of retinopathy of prematurity.
PubMed ID
8438820 View in PubMed
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Active epilepsy in mentally retarded children. I. Prevalence and additional neuro-impairments.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35144
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1995 Oct;84(10):1147-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1995
Author
U. Steffenburg
G. Hagberg
G. Viggedal
M. Kyllerman
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Göteborg, Ostra Hospital, Sweden.
Source
Acta Paediatr. 1995 Oct;84(10):1147-52
Date
Oct-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cerebral Palsy - complications - epidemiology
Chi-Square Distribution
Child
Electroencephalography
Epilepsy - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Retardation - complications - epidemiology
Movement Disorders - classification - complications
Nervous System Diseases - complications - epidemiology
Prevalence
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden - epidemiology
Vision Disorders - complications - epidemiology
Abstract
A population-based study of active epilepsy was conducted in 6-13-year-old mentally retarded children born between 1975 and 1986. The population at risk comprised 48,873 children. Ninety-eight children were identified, 35 mildly and 63 severely retarded. The prevalence was 2.0 per 1000; 0.7 per 1000 for mildly and 1.3 per 1000 for severely retarded children. Sixty-nine children had at least one additional neuroimpairment. Cerebral palsy was found in 42 children with a majority of spastic/dystonic tetraplegias; visual impairment was present in 24 and autism in 24. Thirty-three children had only a mild or no gross motor disability and mild mental retardation, while 23 had IQs
PubMed ID
8563227 View in PubMed
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856 records – page 1 of 86.