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Absence of indigenous specific West Nile virus antibodies in Tyrolean blood donors.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134646
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2012
Author
S T Sonnleitner
J. Simeoni
E. Schmutzhard
M. Niedrig
F. Ploner
H. Schennach
M P Dierich
G. Walder
Author Affiliation
Hygiene and Medical Microbiology, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz Pregl Straße 1-3/III, Innsbruck, Austria. sissyson@gmx.at
Source
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2012 Jan;31(1):77-81
Date
Jan-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Blood Donors
Child, Preschool
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Europe
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Italy
Male
Middle Aged
Neutralization Tests
West Nile Fever - diagnosis - epidemiology - virology
West Nile virus - immunology
Abstract
In the last several years, West Nile virus (WNV) was proven to be present especially in the neighboring countries of Austria, such as Italy, Hungary, and the Czech Republic, as well as in eastern parts of Austria, where it was detected in migratory and domestic birds. In summer 2010, infections with WNV were reported from Romania and northern Greece with about 150 diseased and increasingly fatal cases. We tested the sera of 1,607 blood donors from North Tyrol (Austria) and South Tyrol (Italy) for antibodies against WNV by using IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Initial results of the ELISA tests showed seroprevalence rates of 46.2% in North Tyrol and 0.5% in South Tyrol, which turned out to be false-positive cross-reactions with antibodies against tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) by adjacent neutralization assays. These results indicate that seropositivity against WNV requires confirmation by neutralization assays, as cross-reactivity with TBEV is frequent and because, currently, WNV is not endemic in the study area.
PubMed ID
21556676 View in PubMed
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[A comparison of the immune response induced by DNA or by an inactivated vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57514
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2000 Mar-Apr;(2):54-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Morozova
R V Popova
T G Maksimova
E E Mitrofanova
V N Bakhvalova
Author Affiliation
Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 2000 Mar-Apr;(2):54-7
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Comparative Study
Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - genetics - immunology - pathogenicity
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - immunology - prevention & control
English Abstract
Female
Glycoproteins - immunology
Immunization - methods
Lethal Dose 50
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Vaccines, DNA - immunology
Vaccines, Inactivated - immunology
Viral Nonstructural Proteins - immunology
Viral Structural Proteins - immunology
Viral Vaccines - immunology
Abstract
BALB/c mice were immunized with recombinant plasmid DNA pSVK3-ENS1 and pcDNAI-NS3 containing, respectively, genes E-NS1 and NS3 of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) virus. Antibodies to TBE virus proteins were detected in the blood sera of the immunized animals by the method of the enzyme immunoassay. Though the titers of virus-specific antibodies in the sera of mice immunized with protein vaccines exceeded those registered after immunization with DNA vaccines, essential protective immunity was observed after the use of both vaccines.
PubMed ID
10808575 View in PubMed
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[Action of antiviral antibodies on some viruses isolated from patients with infectious hepatitis]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57183
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1969 May-Jun;31(3):246-50
Publication Type
Article

[Action of gamma irradiation on the infectivity of the potato virus X, the TMV and their RNAs]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature69126
Source
Mikrobiol Zh. 1976 Jan-Feb;38(1):78-80
Publication Type
Article

[A cultured concentrated inactivated vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis studied during the immunization of children and adolescents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198043
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Nov-Dec;(6):50-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
L I Pavlova
M A Gorbunov
M S Vorob'eva
A S Karavanov
V P Grachev
I P Ladyshenskaia
M N Rasshchepkina
L N Mel'nikova
T M Lebedeva
N A Mel'nikov
A G Gusmanova
M Iu Deviatkov
E V Rozanova
M A Mukachev
Author Affiliation
Tarasevich State Research Institute for Standardization and Control of Medical Biological Preparations, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Nov-Dec;(6):50-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Austria
Child
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - prevention & control
Humans
Immunization - methods - statistics & numerical data
Immunization, Secondary - methods - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Time Factors
Vaccines, Inactivated - adverse effects - immunology
Viral Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
The word deals with the results obtained in the study of the reactogenicity and immunological activity of concentrated and inactivated tissue-culture tick-borne encephalitis vaccine, manufactured by the Chumakov Institute of Poliomyelitis and Viral Encephalitides, in the immunization of children and adolescents. The vaccine proved to be moderately reactogenic and exhibited pronounced immunological activity. In 91.5% of the immunized children the fourfold increase of the antibody level was observed. On the basis of the data obtained in this study the tick-borne encephalitis vaccine was recommended for use in medical practice for the prophylaxis of tick-borne encephalitis among children and adolescents.
PubMed ID
10876850 View in PubMed
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Acute encephalitis. A survey of epidemiological, clinical and microbiological features covering a twelve-year period.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature245138
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1981;209(1-2):115-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
1981
Author
M. Koskiniemi
V. Manninen
A. Vaheri
K. Sainio
P. Eistola
P. Karli
Source
Acta Med Scand. 1981;209(1-2):115-20
Date
1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Encephalitis - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prognosis
Sex Factors
Simplexvirus - isolation & purification
Viruses - isolation & purification
Abstract
The 191 adult patients with acute encephalitis who attended the Department of Neurology, University Hospital, Helsinki, during the 12-year period 1967-78, were analyzed for epidemiological, clinical, and microbiological features. Young healthy adults of either sex under 30 years of age were the most susceptible. The duration of symptoms varied from some hours to more than one month (less than or equal to 5 days in half of the patients). Prodromal symptoms were observed in 37.7%, meningeal signs or symptoms in 93.2%, features indicating brain involvement in 84.3% and clear effects on consciousness in 27.7% of the patients. Half (50.8%) recovered, while 43 (22.5%) were left with at least moderate disability after the acute phase. Twelve patients (6.3%) died. Lower socioeconomic status and age over 35 years were associated with increased mortality. The 10 patients with proven or presumptive herpes simplex virus (HSV) etiology had a mortality of 40% and only one recovered satisfactorily. There were 14 further cases suggestive of HSV. Mumps, Coxsackie B, adeno, and measles were the most frequent identifiable causes after HSV. Other etiological factors, including bacteria, appeared occasionally. The etiology remained obscure in 58.6% of the cases.
PubMed ID
6259899 View in PubMed
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[Acute gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus. A summary of Danish studies].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature249325
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1977 Dec 19;139(51):3047-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-19-1977

Adolescent asthma after rhinovirus and respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119180
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2013 Jul;48(7):633-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Marja Ruotsalainen
Mari K Hyvärinen
Eija Piippo-Savolainen
Matti Korppi
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Kuopio University and Kuopio University Hospital, Kuopio, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Pulmonol. 2013 Jul;48(7):633-9
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Asthma - epidemiology
Bronchiolitis, Viral - epidemiology - virology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant
Male
Picornaviridae Infections - epidemiology
Questionnaires
Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections - epidemiology
Respiratory Syncytial Viruses
Rhinovirus
Risk factors
Abstract
Asthma risk is increased after bronchiolitis in infancy. Recent studies have suggested that the risk may be dependent on the causative virus. The aim of the study was to evaluate the asthma risk in adolescence in subjects hospitalized for rhinovirus or respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) bronchiolitis in infancy.
At the median age of 16.5 years, a questionnaire was sent to 96 study subjects hospitalized for bronchiolitis at
PubMed ID
23129516 View in PubMed
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549 records – page 1 of 55.