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[Complications of acupuncture therapy. A study of the literature from 1981-92]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56817
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Apr 20;114(10):1192-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-20-1994
Author
A J Norheim
Author Affiliation
Institutt for samfunnsmedisin Universitetet i Tromsø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Apr 20;114(10):1192-4
Date
Apr-20-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acupuncture Therapy - adverse effects - instrumentation
Bacterial Infections - etiology
Dermatitis, Allergic Contact - etiology
English Abstract
Humans
Needlestick Injuries - complications
Virus Diseases - etiology
Abstract
This study presents the adverse affects of acupuncture as recorded in the Medline database for the years 1981-92. Pneumothorax is the most common mechanical organ injury caused, while hepatitis dominates the infections. Neither pneumothorax nor hepatitis is reported from any Nordic country. Most of the adverse effects of acupuncture seem to be associated with insufficient basic medical knowledge, a low standard of hygiene and inadequate education in acupuncture. The study confirms adverse effects of acupuncture in certain circumstances. Serious adverse effects are few, and acupuncture can be considered as a fairly harmless form of treatment.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 May 20;114(13):15618079254
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 May 30;114(14):16478079272
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1996 Mar 30;116(9):11538658487
PubMed ID
8209317 View in PubMed
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Hb Oslo [ß42(CD1)Phe?Ile; HBB: c.127T>A]: A Novel Unstable Hemoglobin Variant Found in a Norwegian Patient.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature296970
Source
Hemoglobin. 2018 Mar; 42(2):78-83
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Date
Mar-2018
Author
Runa M Grimholt
Anne Vestli
Petter Urdal
Anne Grete Bechensteen
Bente Fjeld
Bjørn Dalhus
Olav Klingenberg
Author Affiliation
a Department of Medical Biochemistry , Oslo University Hospital , Ullevaal, Oslo , Norway.
Source
Hemoglobin. 2018 Mar; 42(2):78-83
Date
Mar-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Case Reports
Journal Article
Keywords
Anemia, Hemolytic - genetics
Blood Transfusion
Chemical Precipitation
Female
Hemoglobinopathies - genetics
Hemoglobins, Abnormal - genetics
Humans
Mutation, Missense
Norway
Virus Diseases - etiology - therapy
beta-Globins - genetics
Abstract
Unstable hemoglobin (Hb) variants are the result of sequence variants in the globin genes causing precipitation of Hb molecules in red blood cells (RBCs). Intracellular inclusions derived from the unstable Hb reduce the life-span of the red cells and may cause hemolytic anemia. Here we describe a patient with a history of hemolytic anemia and low oxygen saturation. She was found to be carrier of a novel unstable Hb variant, Hb Oslo [ß42(CD1)Phe?Ile (TTT>ATT), HBB: c.127T>A] located in the heme pocket of the ß-globin chain. Three-dimensional modeling suggested that isoleucine at position 42 creates weaker interactions with distal histidine and with the heme itself, which may lead to altered stability and decreased oxygen affinity. At steady state, the patient was in good clinical condition with a Hb concentration of 8.0-9.0?g/dL. During virus infections, the Hb concentration fell and on six occasions during 4 years, the patient needed a blood transfusion.
PubMed ID
30032685 View in PubMed
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Infectious complications more than 1 year after liver transplantation: a 3-decade nationwide experience.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138005
Source
Am J Transplant. 2011 Feb;11(2):287-95
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2011
Author
F. Aberg
H. Mäkisalo
K. Höckerstedt
H. Isoniemi
Author Affiliation
Transplantation and Liver Surgery Clinic, Helsinki University Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. Fredrik.Aberg@helsinki.fi
Source
Am J Transplant. 2011 Feb;11(2):287-95
Date
Feb-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bacterial Infections - etiology
Cholangitis - epidemiology - etiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Immunosuppression - adverse effects
Incidence
Infection - epidemiology - etiology - mortality
Infection Control
Liver Transplantation - adverse effects
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Mycoses - etiology
Pneumonia - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Risk factors
Sepsis - epidemiology - etiology
Time Factors
Virus Diseases - etiology
Abstract
Because few reports have addressed infections late (=1 year) after liver transplantation (LT), we evaluated the incidence, risk factors and pathogens involved. Infection data were from the Finnish LT registry, with starting date, type and relevant pathogens for 501 Finnish adult LT patients surviving =1 year post-transplant. Follow-up end points were end of study, death or retransplantation. Logistic regression to assess risk factors was adjusted for age, gender and follow-up time. With 3923 person-years of follow-up, overall infection incidence was 66/1000 person-years; 155 (31%) suffered 259 infections, and two-thirds experienced only one infection. Cholangitis (20%), pneumonia (19%) and sepsis (14%) were most common. The most frequent bacteria were Enterococcus spp. and Escherichia coli, and the most frequent viruses cytomegalovirus and varicella zoster virus. Fungal infections were rare (n = 7). With 13 fatal infections, 17% of all late deaths involved infection. Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and Roux-en-Y-type biliary anastomosis were associated with cholangitis; 18% of PSC patients suffered late cholangitis. Late acute rejection was associated with sepsis. Age, gender or cytomegalovirus did not significantly influence late infections. In conclusion, although infection risk under maintenance immunosuppression therapy is relatively low, particular vigilance regarding cholangitis, pneumonia and sepsis seems appropriate.
PubMed ID
21219571 View in PubMed
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Prospective controlled survey of viral infections in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during chemotherapy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature23252
Source
Cancer. 1995 Apr 1;75(7):1712-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-1995
Author
M. Möttönen
M. Uhari
M. Lanning
H. Tuokko
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Cancer. 1995 Apr 1;75(7):1712-7
Date
Apr-1-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Infant
Leukemia, Lymphocytic, Acute - complications - drug therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Virus Diseases - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Infections cause significant morbidity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The incidence of viral infections commonly occurring in children with ALL receiving chemotherapy was compared with viral infections in control children and the spread of infections in families was traced. METHODS: Fifteen families of children with ALL receiving chemotherapy (62 members) and 26 matched control families (106 members) were monitored for a total of 36,197 and 36,583 days, respectively, from November/ 1987 to December/1989 for the occurrence of infections. RESULTS: The children with ALL had more infections than their control counterparts (P
PubMed ID
8826932 View in PubMed
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[Viral pollution of drinking water in industrial towns of Eastern Siberia]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature56668
Source
Gig Sanit. 2000 May-Jun;(3):17-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
L M Mamontova
E D Savilov
V A Astaf'ev
Iu A Rakhmanin
A E Nedachin
Source
Gig Sanit. 2000 May-Jun;(3):17-9
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Cytomegalovirus - isolation & purification
English Abstract
Hepatitis B virus - isolation & purification
Hepatovirus - isolation & purification
Intestinal Diseases - etiology
Rotavirus - isolation & purification
Siberia
Virus Diseases - etiology
Water Microbiology
Water Supply - standards
Abstract
The drinking water was tested for viruses in the industrial towns of Eastern Siberia. The findings suggest that extremely poor provision with good quality drinking water is seen in the town of Ust-Ilimsk where there were high levels of pathogenic viruses in the water. The high contamination of drinking water with hepatitis A virus and rotavirus is a cause of higher incidence of intestinal viral infections in the areas under study.
PubMed ID
10900788 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.