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6 records – page 1 of 1.

[Decreasing vaccination rate--increasing risk of epidemics]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57665
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1996 Jan 1;158(1):13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1-1996

[Infection problems connected to child day care centers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35752
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Jun 30;114(17):1936-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-30-1994
Author
K K Lie
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for Samfunnsmedisin Statens Institutt for Folkehelse, Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1994 Jun 30;114(17):1936-8
Date
Jun-30-1994
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Child Day Care Centers
Child, Preschool
English Abstract
Humans
Infant
Infection Control
Norway - epidemiology
Risk factors
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
International studies show that children in day care centres have approximately twice as many episodes of infectious diseases as children cared for at home, while, according to most studies, children in family day care experience an intermediate number of infections. After some months in day care the risk of infection decreases. The diseases in question are usually transferred from person to person through close physical contact. Children's general mode of behaviour tends to favour such transmission. The risk of infection in pregnant women on the day care staff and among parents is considered. Finally, the author discusses the potential to control infection in a day care setting. Strict rules for isolation of sick children probably have little effect on the spread of the infections. Good routines for washing hands and for changing nappies are considered to be the most important ways of controlling infection in day care centres.
PubMed ID
8079320 View in PubMed
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[Infectious diseases and climate change]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95348
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3178-81
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-26-2009
Author
Valentiner-Branth Palle
Glismann Steffen Offersen
Mølbak Kåre
Author Affiliation
Statens Serum Institut, Epidemiologisk Afdeling, DK-2300 København S, Denmark.
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2009 Oct 26;171(44):3178-81
Date
Oct-26-2009
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Bacterial Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Climate
Communicable disease control
Denmark - epidemiology
Disease Vectors
Europe - epidemiology
Food Microbiology
Greenhouse Effect
Humans
Insect Vectors
Risk factors
Rodentia
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Water Microbiology
Abstract
Climate changes will likely have an impact on the spectrum of infectious diseases in Europe. We may see an increase in vector-borne diseases, diseases spread by rodents such as Hantavirus, and food- and water-borne diseases. As the effects of climate changes are likely to occur gradually, a modern industrialised country such as Denmark will have the opportunity to adapt to the expected changes.
PubMed ID
19857396 View in PubMed
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STOPFLU: is it possible to reduce the number of days off in office work by improved hand-hygiene?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature143092
Source
Trials. 2010;11:69
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Carita Savolainen-Kopra
Jaason Haapakoski
Piia A Peltola
Thedi Ziegler
Terttu Korpela
Pirjo Anttila
Ali Amiryousefi
Pentti Huovinen
Markku Huvinen
Heikki Noronen
Pia Riikkala
Merja Roivainen
Petri Ruutu
Juha Teirilä
Erkki Vartiainen
Tapani Hovi
Author Affiliation
National Institute for Health and Welfare (THL), Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, Gastrointestinal Infections Unit, Helsinki, Finland. carita.savolainen-kopra@thl.fi
Source
Trials. 2010;11:69
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Anti-Infective Agents, Local
Cluster analysis
Communicable Diseases - epidemiology - transmission - virology
Cost of Illness
Finland - epidemiology
Hand Disinfection - methods
Humans
Hygiene
Occupational Health
Questionnaires
Research Design
Sentinel Surveillance
Sick Leave
Soaps
Time Factors
Virus Diseases - epidemiology - prevention & control - transmission
Abstract
Acute infectious diseases are major causes of short periods of days off from work, day care and school. These diseases are mainly caused by viruses and hands have a key role in their transmission. Thus, hypothetically, they can be controlled with means of intensified hand hygiene. In this study we aim to elucidate the effect of acute infectious diseases on the work contribution in common office work and study the influence of improved hand hygiene on possible reduction of infectious disease episodes and days off from work due to acute infectious diseases.
The voluntary participants have been recruited from six companies in the Helsinki region. The designated 21 study clusters were identified as operationally distinct working units each containing at least 50 people. The clusters were matched and randomized based on results of a pre-trial contagion risk survey. Improved hand hygiene is being executed with guided hand-washing with soap and water in one intervention arm and with alcohol based hand rubbing disinfectant in the other. Participants in both arms have received guidance on how to avoid infections and how to implement contagion stopping habits. A control arm is acting as before regarding hand hygiene. Data collection for evaluation of the efficacy of the interventions is based on self-reporting through weekly electronic reports. The questionnaire is enquiring about possible respiratory or gastrointestinal symptoms during the preceding week, and requests a daily report of presence of symptoms and working capacity. Etiology of the symptoms is not searched for individually, but contribution of different viruses is evaluated by sentinel surveillance, where occupational health clinics located in the premises of the participating companies collect specimens from employees visiting the clinic. Common causative agents of the diseases are being searched for using real-time PCR techniques. The duration of the intervention will be 16 months. Primary endpoints of the study are the number of reported infection episodes in a cluster within a time frame of 100 reporting weeks and the number of reported sick leave episodes in a cluster within a time frame of 100 reporting weeks.
ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00821509.
Notes
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Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2009 Feb 1;48(3):285-9119115974
Cites: Public Health Nurs. 2007 Jan-Feb;24(1):48-5917214653
PubMed ID
20525328 View in PubMed
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6 records – page 1 of 1.