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381 records – page 1 of 39.

Source
Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):794-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-2005
Source
Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):794-5
Date
Oct-6-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Biomedical Research - ethics - legislation & jurisprudence
Bioterrorism - prevention & control
Evolution, Molecular
Female
History, 20th Century
Humans
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - history - prevention & control - virology
Orthomyxoviridae - genetics - pathogenicity
Publishing
Time Factors
Virulence - genetics
Virulence Factors
Notes
Comment In: Nature. 2006 Jan 19;439(7074):26616421546
Comment On: Nature. 2005 Oct 6;437(7060):889-9316208372
Erratum In: Nature. 2005 Oct 13;437(7061):940
PubMed ID
16208326 View in PubMed
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[A case of human infection with brucellosis from a cat]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36213
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
L P Repina
A I Nikulina
I A Kosilov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1993 Jul-Aug;(4):66-8
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Brucella - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Brucellosis - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission - veterinary
Cat Diseases - epidemiology - microbiology - transmission
Cats
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Vectors
English Abstract
Female
Guinea Pigs
Humans
Male
Mice
Rural Population - statistics & numerical data
Siberia - epidemiology
Virulence
Abstract
The epidemiological study of a focus of Brucella infection revealed that an outbreak of brucellosis occurred in a small town, and the source of this infection was a domestic cat. As the result of contacts with this cat, six persons, among them three children aged 3, 8 and 12 years, had brucellosis. In all these patients acute brucellosis was diagnosed. Simultaneously with the clinical manifestations of the disease, a rise in antibody titer from 1:50 to 1:1,600 was observed. Brucella cultures isolated from the blood of one of the patients and from the internal organs of the cat exhibited the properties, similar to those of "rodent" strains, i. e. their differential signs permit their classification with B. suis, serovar 5.
PubMed ID
8067119 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of genomes of virulent and avirulent strains of Vibrio cholerae O139].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179953
Source
Mol Gen Mikrobiol Virusol. 2004;(2):11-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
G A Eroshenko
A V Osin
E Iu Shchelkanova
N I Smirnova
Author Affiliation
Mikrob Russian Research Anti-Plague Institute, Saratov.
Source
Mol Gen Mikrobiol Virusol. 2004;(2):11-6
Date
2004
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenosine Triphosphatases - genetics
Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Toxins - genetics
Cholera - microbiology
Cholera Toxin - genetics
DNA-Binding Proteins - genetics
Genome, Bacterial
Humans
Membrane Glycoproteins
Membrane Proteins - genetics
Proteins - genetics
Russia
Serine Endopeptidases - genetics
Transcription Factors - genetics
Vibrio cholerae O139 - genetics - pathogenicity
Virulence Factors - genetics
Water Microbiology
Abstract
A comparative analysis of the genome of V. cholerae O139 strains isolated in Russia's territory from patients with cholera and from the environment showed essential differences in their structures. The genome of clinical strains possessed all tested genes associated with virulence (ctxAB, zot, ace, rstC, rtxA, hap, toxR and toxT) and the at-tRS site for the CTXp phage DNA integration. As for the O139 V. cholerae chromosome strains isolated from water, 70% of the studied genes (ctxAB, zot, ace, rstC, tcpA, and toxT) and the attRS sequence were not detected in them. A lack of the key virulence genes in O139-serogroup "water" vibrios, including genes of toxin-coregulated adhesion pili. (that are receptors for the CTXp phage), and of the attachment site of the above phage are indicative of that the O139 V. cholerae strains isolated from open water sources located in different Russia's regions are epidemically negligible.
PubMed ID
15164715 View in PubMed
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[A comparative analysis of the Salmonella typhi strains isolated from patients and bacterial carriers]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70360
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Dec;(12):8-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1989
Author
L E Riabchenko
L A Riapis
L M Sladkova
E I Vostrova
Iu V Kravtsov
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1989 Dec;(12):8-11
Date
Dec-1989
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Antigens, Bacterial - analysis
Bacteriophage Typing
Carrier State - microbiology
Comparative Study
Drug Resistance, Microbial
English Abstract
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Molecular Weight
Plasmids - genetics
Salmonella typhi - classification - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Typhoid Fever - microbiology
Ukraine
Virulence
Abstract
The comparative analysis of 133 S. typhi clinical strains isolated from patients and carriers in Dnepropetrovsk Province in 1978-1987 was carried out. As shown by this analysis, 10 Vi phage types were represented in the set of strains under study, phage types A and F1 being the most numerous ones. Phage type F1 occurred less frequently among the strains isolated from carriers. 31.1% of the strains were found to contain plasmids with different molecular weight ranging from 96 to 0.5 MD. The occurrence of plasmid-containing strains remained at the same level during the whole period under study. Low-molecular plasmids occurred more frequently in the strains isolated from carriers. The minimal suppressive concentrations of a number of antibiotics, such as penicillin, ampicillin, monomycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, rifampicin and streptomycin, were determined. 7% of the strains were resistant to penicillin, 9% to monomycin, 15%--to tetracycline and 2.6% to chloramphenicol. The correlation between penicillin and monomycin resistance of the strains and the presence of the plasmid with a molecular weight of 60 MD in these strains was established. All strains were shown to be highly variable in the degree of their virulence: from 10(2) to 10(8). The strains isolated from patients possessed greater virulence.
PubMed ID
2629429 View in PubMed
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Adhesin and superantigen genes and the capacity of Staphylococcus aureus to colonize the infantile gut.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132145
Source
J Infect Dis. 2011 Sep 1;204(5):714-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-2011
Author
Forough L Nowrouzian
Olivier Dauwalder
Helene Meugnier
Michele Bes
Jerome Etienne
François Vandenesch
Erika Lindberg
Bill Hesselmar
Robert Saalman
Inga-Lisa Strannegård
Nils Aberg
Ingegerd Adlerberth
Agnes E Wold
Gerard Lina
Author Affiliation
Institution for Biomedicine, Department of Infectious Disease, University of Gothenburg, Sweden. forough.nowrouzian@microbio.gu.se
Source
J Infect Dis. 2011 Sep 1;204(5):714-21
Date
Sep-1-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adhesins, Bacterial - genetics
Alleles
Bacterial Load
Bacterial Proteins - genetics
Bacterial Typing Techniques
Enterotoxins - genetics
Feces - microbiology
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Staphylococcal Infections - genetics
Staphylococcus aureus - genetics - pathogenicity
Superantigens - genetics
Sweden
Trans-Activators - genetics
Virulence Factors - genetics
Abstract
Staphylococcus aureus is a pathogen and a skin commensal that is today also common in the infant gut flora. We examine the role of S. aureus virulence factors for gut colonization. S. aureus isolated from quantitative stool cultures of 49 Swedish infants followed from birth to 12 months of age were assessed for 30 virulence-associated genes, spa type, and agr allele by serial polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays. Strains carrying genes encoding collagen-binding protein, and the superantigens S. aureus enterotoxin O/M (SEO/SEM) had higher stool counts than strains lacking these genes, whereas genes for S. aureus enterotoxin A (SEA) were associated with low counts. A cluster of strains belonging to agr allele I and the spa clonal cluster 630 (spa-CC 630) that carried genes encoding SEO/SEM, SEC, collagen-binding protein, and elastin-binding protein were all long-time colonizers. Thus, certain S. aureus virulence factors might promote gut colonization.
PubMed ID
21844297 View in PubMed
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Adverse health events associated with antimicrobial drug resistance in Campylobacter species: a registry-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58186
Source
J Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 1;191(7):1050-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1-2005
Author
Morten Helms
Jacob Simonsen
Katharina E P Olsen
Kare Mølbak
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology Research, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
J Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 1;191(7):1050-5
Date
Apr-1-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Campylobacter - drug effects - isolation & purification - pathogenicity
Campylobacter Infections - complications - epidemiology - microbiology - mortality
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Erythromycin - pharmacology
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Middle Aged
Quinolones - pharmacology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Risk factors
Virulence
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Resistance to clinically important antimicrobial agents, particularly fluoroquinolones and macrolides, is increasing among Campylobacter isolates, but few studies have explored the human health consequences of such resistance. METHODS: In a registry-based cohort study, we determined the risk of invasive illness and death associated with infection with quinolone- and erythromycin-resistant Campylobacter strains, while adjusting for comorbidity. We linked data from the Danish Surveillance Registry for Enteric Pathogens with data from the Civil Registration System and National Health Registries. RESULTS: Of 3471 patients with Campylobacter infection, 22 (0.63%) had an adverse event, defined as invasive illness or death, within 90 days of the date of receipt of samples. Patients infected with quinolone-resistant Campylobacter strains had a 6-fold increased risk of an adverse event within 30 days of the date of receipt of samples, compared with patients infected with quinolone- and erythromycin-susceptible Campylobacter strains (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 6.17 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 1.62-23.47]). However, infection with erythromycin-resistant strains was associated with a >5-fold risk of an adverse event within 90 days of the date of receipt of samples (AOR, 5.51 [95% CI, 1.19-25.50]). CONCLUSIONS: The present study provides evidence of the human health consequences of resistance to clinically important agents among Campylobacter infections and the need for increased efforts to mitigate such resistance.
Notes
Comment In: J Infect Dis. 2005 Apr 1;191(7):1029-3115747234
Comment In: J Infect Dis. 2005 Dec 1;192(11):2027-8; author reply 2028-916267777
Erratum In: J Infect Dis. 2005 May 1;191(9):1570
PubMed ID
15747238 View in PubMed
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Aeromonas spp. isolated from ready-to-eat seafood on the Norwegian market: prevalence, putative virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature312214
Source
J Appl Microbiol. 2021 Apr; 130(4):1380-1393
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2021
Author
H-J Lee
S Hoel
B-T Lunestad
J Lerfall
A N Jakobsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway.
Source
J Appl Microbiol. 2021 Apr; 130(4):1380-1393
Date
Apr-2021
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Aeromonas - classification - drug effects - genetics - isolation & purification
Ampicillin - pharmacology
Animals
Anti-Bacterial Agents - pharmacology
Bacterial Proteins - genetics - metabolism
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Food contamination - analysis
Norway
Prevalence
Seafood - microbiology
Virulence Factors - genetics - metabolism
Abstract
We aim to investigate the prevalence, putative virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance of mesophilic Aeromonas isolated from ready-to-eat (RTE) seafood available on the Norwegian market, and to assess the potential risks by consuming RTE seafood to consumers.
The prevalence of mesophilic Aeromonas in 148 RTE seafood was investigated and the highest prevalence was found in retail sushi (17%), followed by oysters (10%), fresh salmon loins (10%) and scallops (4%). Among 43 Aeromonas isolates, 75% of them were identified as A. media, 23% as A. salmonicida and 2% as A. bestiarum based on partial gryB gene sequencing. Aeromonas isolates were potentially pathogenic due to the presence of four virulence genes: alt (73%), hylA (22%), aerA (17%) and act (6%). In addition, all isolates were resistant to ampicillin and erythromycin. Most of the isolates (98%) were multidrug resistant.
The occurrence of potentially pathogenic and multidrug-resistant Aeromonas strains in RTE seafood implies a potential risk to consumers. Our finding suggests that RTE seafood could be a potential vehicle for the transfer of virulent and multidrug-resistant Aeromonas.
To our knowledge, this is the first study to report multiple antibiotic resistance in Aeromonas associated with RTE seafood in Norway.
PubMed ID
33025711 View in PubMed
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Agricultural, socioeconomic and environmental variables as risks for human verotoxigenic Escherichia coli (VTEC) infection in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130372
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:275
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Katri Jalava
Jukka Ollgren
Marjut Eklund
Anja Siitonen
Markku Kuusi
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Surveillance and Control, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland. katri.jalava@thl.fi
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2011;11:275
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Electrophoresis, Gel, Pulsed-Field
Environmental Exposure
Escherichia coli Infections - epidemiology - microbiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Models, Statistical
Molecular Typing
Risk factors
Shiga-Toxigenic Escherichia coli - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Socioeconomic Factors
Virulence Factors - genetics
Abstract
Verotoxigenic E. coli (VTEC) is the cause of severe gastrointestinal infection especially among infants. Between 10 and 20 cases are reported annually to the National Infectious Disease Register (NIDR) in Finland. The aim of this study was to identify explanatory variables for VTEC infections reported to the NIDR in Finland between 1997 and 2006. We applied a hurdle model, applicable for a dataset with an excess of zeros.
We enrolled 131 domestically acquired primary cases of VTEC between 1997 and 2006 from routine surveillance data. The isolated strains were characterized by virulence type, serogroup, phage type and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. By applying a two-part Bayesian hurdle model to infectious disease surveillance data, we were able to create a model in which the covariates were associated with the probability for occurrence of the cases in the logistic regression part and the magnitude of covariate changes in the Poisson regression part if cases do occur. The model also included spatial correlations between neighbouring municipalities.
The average annual incidence rate was 4.8 cases per million inhabitants based on the cases as reported to the NIDR. Of the 131 cases, 74 VTEC O157 and 58 non-O157 strains were isolated (one person had dual infections). The number of bulls per human population and the proportion of the population with a higher education were associated with an increased occurrence and incidence of human VTEC infections in 70 (17%) of 416 of Finnish municipalities. In addition, the proportion of fresh water per area, the proportion of cultivated land per area and the proportion of low income households with children were associated with increased incidence of VTEC infections.
With hurdle models we were able to distinguish between risk factors for the occurrence of the disease and the incidence of the disease for data characterised by an excess of zeros. The density of bulls and the proportion of the population with higher education were significant both for occurrence and incidence, while the proportion of fresh water, cultivated land, and the proportion of low income households with children were significant for the incidence of the disease.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22008456 View in PubMed
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381 records – page 1 of 39.