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Adolescents' perception of bullying: who is the victim? Who is the bully? What can be done to stop bullying?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87357
Source
Adolescence. 2007;42(168):749-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Frisén Ann
Jonsson Anna-Karin
Persson Camilla
Author Affiliation
Department of Psychology, Göteborg University, Box 500, SE-405 30 Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Adolescence. 2007;42(168):749-61
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Adolescent Psychology - methods
Adult
Age Factors
Aggression - psychology
Crime Victims - psychology
Dominance-Subordination
Female
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Self Concept
Sex Distribution
Social Perception
Sweden
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
The main aim of this study was to describe adolescents' perceptions and experiences of bullying: their thoughts about why children and adolescents are bullied, their ideas about why some bully others, and what they believe is important in order to stop bullying. The adolescents were asked about experiences throughout their school years. The study group was comprised of 119 high school students, with a mean age of 17.1 (SD = 1.2). Of the adolescents who reported, 39% indicated that they had been bullied at some time during their school years and 28% said that they had bullied others; 13% reported being both victims and bullies. The ages during which most students had been bullied at school were between 7 and 9 years. Bullies reported that most of the bullying took place when they were 10 to 12 years old. The most common reason as to why individuals are bullied was that they have a different appearance. The participants believe that those who bully suffer from low self-esteem. The most common response to the question "What do you think makes bullying stop?" was that the bully matures. The next most frequent response was that the victim stood up for himself/herself. Those who were not involved in bullying during their school years had a much stronger belief that victims can stand up for themselves than did the victims themselves.
PubMed ID
18229509 View in PubMed
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Characterizing violence in health care in British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature150574
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Aug;65(8):1655-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2009
Author
Rakel N Kling
Annalee Yassi
Elizabeth Smailes
Chris Y Lovato
Mieke Koehoorn
Author Affiliation
School of Environmental Health, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. rkling@interchange.ubc.ca
Source
J Adv Nurs. 2009 Aug;65(8):1655-63
Date
Aug-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
British Columbia - epidemiology
Female
Health Care Sector - statistics & numerical data
Health Facilities - statistics & numerical data
Health Personnel - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Staff, Hospital - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Risk Management - statistics & numerical data
Violence - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Workplace - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
The high rate of violence in the healthcare sector supports the need for greater surveillance efforts.
The purpose of this study was to use a province-wide workplace incident reporting system to calculate rates and identify risk factors for violence in the British Columbia healthcare industry by occupational groups, including nursing.
Data were extracted for a 1-year period (2004-2005) from the Workplace Health Indicator Tracking and Evaluation database for all employee reports of violence incidents for four of the six British Columbia health authorities. Risk factors for violence were identified through comparisons of incident rates (number of incidents/100,000 worked hours) by work characteristics, including nursing occupations and work units, and by regression models adjusted for demographic factors.
Across health authorities, three groups at particularly high risk for violence were identified: very small healthcare facilities [rate ratios (RR) = 6.58, 95% CI =3.49, 12.41], the care aide occupation (RR = 10.05, 95% CI = 6.72, 15.05), and paediatric departments in acute care hospitals (RR = 2.22, 95% CI = 1.05, 4.67).
The three high-risk groups warrant targeted prevention or intervention efforts be implemented. The identification of high-risk groups supports the importance of a province-wide surveillance system for public health planning.
PubMed ID
19493143 View in PubMed
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Childhood bullying as a predictor for becoming a teenage mother in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138796
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;20(1):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
  1 document  
Author
Venla Lehti
Andre Sourander
Anat Klomek
Solja Niemelä
Lauri Sillanmäki
Jorma Piha
Kirsti Kumpulainen
Tuula Tamminen
Irma Moilanen
Fredrik Almqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Child Psychiatry, University of Turku, Itäinen Pitkäkatu 1 / Varia, 20014, Turku, Finland. venla.lehti@utu.fi
Source
Eur Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2011 Jan;20(1):49-55
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
File Size
240491
Keywords
Adolescent
Birth rate
Bullying - psychology
Child
Crime Victims - psychology - rehabilitation
Family Health
Female
Finland
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Pregnancy
Pregnancy in Adolescence - prevention & control - psychology
Research Report
Risk factors
Sex Education - organization & administration
Social Support
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study is to examine the association between bullying behaviour at the age of 8 and becoming a mother under the age of 20. This birth cohort study included 2,867 Finnish girls at baseline in 1989. Register-based follow-up data on births was collected until the end of 2001. Information, both on the main exposure and outcome, was available for 2,507 girls. Both bullies and victims had an increased risk of becoming a teenage mother independent of family-related risk factors. When controlled for childhood psychopathology, however, the association remained significant for bullies (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.1) and bully-victims (OR 1.8, 95% CI 1.05-3.2), but not for pure victims. Reports of bullying and victimisation from the girls themselves, their parents and their teachers were all associated with becoming a teenage mother independent of each other. There is a predictive association between being a bully in childhood and becoming a mother in adolescence. It may be useful to target bullies for teenage pregnancy prevention.
Notes
Comment In: Evid Based Ment Health. 2011 Aug;14(3):6421764863
PubMed ID
21136277 View in PubMed
Documents

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[Columbine, Erfurt, Jokela: lessons learned from school massacres].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159361
Source
Lakartidningen. 2007 Nov 28-Dec 4;104(48):3697-8
Publication Type
Article

Comorbid personality disorders and substance use disorders of mentally ill homicide offenders: a structured clinical study on dual and triple diagnoses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179847
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2004;30(1):59-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Anu Putkonen
Irma Kotilainen
Christian C Joyal
Jari Tiihonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Forensic Psychiatry, University of Kuopio and Niuvanniemi Hospital, Finland. anu.putkonen@niuva.fi
Source
Schizophr Bull. 2004;30(1):59-72
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antisocial Personality Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diagnosis, Dual (Psychiatry)
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Homicide - psychology
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - complications - psychology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Substance-Related Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Comorbid substance use disorders (SUDs) increase the risk of homicide by persons with major mental disorders (MMDs). However, there are no published data from clinical interviews or lifetime objective documents on the prevalence of lifetime personality disorder (PD) or SUD among a comprehensive sample of mentally ill homicide offenders. Therefore, a nationally representative sample of men with MMD (n = 90) who had committed or attempted homicide was assessed using the research version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I and Axis II Disorders. Lifetime documents, records, and questionnaires from persons who knew the subjects since childhood were used. Seventy-eight percent of the mentally ill homicide offenders were diagnosed with schizophrenia, 17 percent with schizoaffective disorder, and 5 percent with other psychosis. A lifetime SUD was detected in 74 percent and alcohol use disorder in 72 percent. PD accounted for 51 percent, in 47 percent as antisocial personality disorder (APD). All subjects diagnosed with PD had SUD. Only 25 percent of the subjects had neither SUD nor PD. Among persons with dual diagnoses (MMD and SUD), about two-thirds had PD or APD. These results indicated that there were two-thirds major diagnostic categories of psychotic homicide offenders: about one-half had triple diagnosis (APD + SUD + MMD), one-quarter had "pure" dual diagnosis (SUD + MMD), and one-quarter had "pure" MMD. The fourth possible category, "APD + MMD but no SUD," was not found. The prevention of severe violence by persons with MMD necessitates effective treatments for those with dual diagnosis who also have a history of APD.
PubMed ID
15176762 View in PubMed
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A comparative study of the experiences of violence of English and Swedish mental health nurses.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71900
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2001 Aug;38(4):419-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2001
Author
P. Nolan
J. Soares
J. Dallender
S. Thomsen
B. Arnetz
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, The Medical School, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK. p.nolan@bham.ac.uk
Source
Int J Nurs Stud. 2001 Aug;38(4):419-26
Date
Aug-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Comparative Study
Cross-Cultural Comparison
England - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Job Satisfaction
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Staff - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Occupational Health - statistics & numerical data
Psychiatric Nursing
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Self Concept
Social Support
Sweden - epidemiology
Violence - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Recent studies suggest that violence in health care environments, especially mental health care, appears to be increasing. Although there is a lack of cross-cultural studies to prove it, this increase in violence would seem to be an international phenomenon. The present study sought to compare the extent and nature of violence encountered by mental health nurses in Sweden and England. Systematic studies of violence have previously been carried out independently in both countries but this was the first attempt to compare levels of violence. Clearly defined study protocols were put in place, an operational definition of 'violence' adhered to, and random samples recruited. A specially designed questionnaire was sent to every subject (Swedish nurses n=720; English nurses n=296) enquiring about the extent of nurses' exposure to violence, the nature and severity of the violence experienced, and the effect of violence on self-esteem and job satisfaction. Significant differences were found with English nurses experiencing more violence than their Swedish counterparts. Yet support for English nurses appeared to be less good than for Swedish nurses. Reasons for the differences are discussed along with possible measures to minimise the frequency of violence against nurses and the negative effects on their work.
PubMed ID
11470100 View in PubMed
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The core characteristics and nursing care activities in psychiatric intensive care units in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86255
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2008 Apr;17(2):98-107
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Salzmann-Erikson Martin
Salzmann-Krikson Martin
Lützén Kim
Ivarsson Ann-Britt
Eriksson Henrik
Author Affiliation
School of Health and Social Sciences, Högskolan Dalarna, Dalarna, and Department of Health Sciences, Orebro University, Falun, Sweden. mse@du.se
Source
Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2008 Apr;17(2):98-107
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Empathy
Female
Humans
Intensive Care - organization & administration - psychology
Male
Mental Disorders - nursing - psychology
Middle Aged
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Nursing Staff, Hospital - organization & administration - psychology
Psychiatric Nursing - organization & administration
Questionnaires
Sweden
Treatment Refusal - psychology
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Abstract
Internationally, research on psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs) commonly reports results from demographic studies such as criteria for admission, need for involuntary treatment, and the occurrence of violent behaviour. A few international studies describe the caring aspect of the PICUs based specifically on caregivers' experiences. The concept of PICU in Sweden is not clearly defined. The aim of this study is to describe the core characteristics of a PICU in Sweden and to describe the care activities provided for patients admitted to the PICUs. Critical incident technique was used as the research method. Eighteen caregivers at a PICU participated in the study by completing a semistructured questionnaire. In-depth interviews with three nurses and two assistant nurses also constitute the data. An analysis of the content identified four categories that characterize the core of PICU: the dramatic admission, protests and refusal of treatment, escalating behaviours, and temporarily coercive measure. Care activities for PICUs were also analysed and identified as controlling - establishing boundaries, protecting - warding off, supporting - giving intensive assistance, and structuring the environment. Finally, the discussion put focus on determining the intensive aspect of psychiatric care which has not been done in a Swedish perspective before. PICUs were interpreted as a level of care as it is composed by limited structures and closeness in care.
Notes
Erratum In: Int J Ment Health Nurs. 2008 Jun;17(3):224Salzmann-Krikson, Martin [corrected to Salzmann-Erikson, Martin]
PubMed ID
18307598 View in PubMed
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Dealing with workplace violence in emergency primary health care: a focus group study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271158
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2015;16:51
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Tone Morken
Ingrid H Johansen
Kjersti Alsaker
Source
BMC Fam Pract. 2015;16:51
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Female
Focus Groups
Health Personnel - psychology
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Primary Health Care - organization & administration
Qualitative Research
Safety Management - methods - organization & administration
Workplace - standards
Workplace Violence - prevention & control - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Prevention and management of workplace violence among health workers has been described in different health care settings. However, little is known about which phenomena the emergency primary health care (EPC) organization should attend to in their strategies for preventing and managing it. In the current study, we therefore explored how EPC personnel have dealt with threats and violence from visitors or patients, focusing on how organizational factors affected the incidents.
A focus group study was performed with a sample of 37 nurses and physicians aged 25-69 years. Eight focus group interviews were conducted, and the participants were invited to talk about their experiences of violence in EPC. Analysis was conducted by systematic text condensation, searching for themes describing the participants' experiences.
Four main themes emerged for anticipating or dealing with incidents of threats or violence within the system: (1) minimizing the risk of working alone, (2) being prepared, (3) resolving the mismatch between patient expectations and the service offered, and (4) supportive manager response.
Our study shows a potential for development of better organizational strategies for protecting EPC personnel who are at risk from workplace violence.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25929751 View in PubMed
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Decreased risk for violence in patients admitted to forensic care, measured with the HCR-20.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature108234
Source
Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2013 Aug;27(4):191-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Helen Olsson
Susanne Strand
Lisbeth Kristiansen
Mats Sjöling
Kenneth Asplund
Author Affiliation
Mid Sweden University, Sweden. helen.olsson@miun.se
Source
Arch Psychiatr Nurs. 2013 Aug;27(4):191-7
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antisocial Personality Disorder - diagnosis - nursing - psychology
Commitment of Mentally Ill
Female
Hospitals, Psychiatric
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - diagnosis - nursing - psychology
Middle Aged
Patient Admission
Personality Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Personality Disorders - diagnosis - nursing - psychology
Prisoners - psychology
Psychometrics - statistics & numerical data
Psychotic Disorders - diagnosis - nursing - psychology
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Sex Factors
Social Support
Stress, Psychological - complications
Substance-Related Disorders - diagnosis - nursing - psychology
Sweden
Violence - prevention & control - psychology
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of this study was to explore if patients admitted to forensic psychiatric care decreased their assessed risk for violence over time, to identify patients who decreased their assessed risk for violence exceptionally well (30% or more) on the clinical (C) and risk management (R) scales in the (HCR-20), and to compare them in terms of demographic data.
The HCR-20 risk assessment instrument was used to assess the risk for violence in 267 patients admitted to a Swedish forensic psychiatric clinic between 1997 and 2010. Their assessments at admission were compared with a second, and most recent, risk assessment.
The risk for violence decreased over time. Demographic criteria had no impact on differences on decreased risk. Only two factors, namely gender and psychopathy showed a difference. Risk factors associated with stress and lack of personal support were the items that turned out to be the most difficult to reduce.
The results show that risk prevention in forensic care does work and it is important to continue to work with risk management. The study highlights the importance of a careful analysis of the patient's risk for violence in order to work with the patient's specific risk factors to reduce the risk.
PubMed ID
23915697 View in PubMed
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86 records – page 1 of 9.