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201 records – page 1 of 21.

Activity profile and physiological response to football training for untrained males and females, elderly and youngsters: influence of the number of players.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature100640
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Apr;20 Suppl 1:14-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2010
Author
M B Randers
L. Nybo
J. Petersen
J J Nielsen
L. Christiansen
M. Bendiksen
J. Brito
J. Bangsbo
P. Krustrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Exercise and Sport Sciences, Section of Human Physiology, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark. pkrustrup@ifi.ku.dk
Source
Scand J Med Sci Sports. 2010 Apr;20 Suppl 1:14-23
Date
Apr-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Basal Metabolism - physiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Denmark
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Homeless Persons
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Physical Exertion - physiology
Physical Fitness - physiology
Soccer - physiology
Time and Motion Studies
Videotape Recording
Young Adult
Abstract
The present study examined the activity profile, heart rate and metabolic response of small-sided football games for untrained males (UM, n=26) and females (UF, n=21) and investigated the influence of the number of players (UM: 1v1, 3v3, 7v7; UF: 2v2, 4v4 and 7v7). Moreover, heart rate response to small-sided games was studied for children aged 9 and 12 years (C9+C12, n=75), as well as homeless (HM, n=15), middle-aged (MM, n=9) and elderly (EM, n=11) men. During 7v7, muscle glycogen decreased more for UM than UF (28 +/- 6 vs 11 +/- 5%; P90% of HR(max) ranged from 147 +/- 4 (EM) to 162 +/- 2 (UM) b.p.m. and 10.8 +/- 1.5 (UF) to 47.8 +/- 5.8% (EM). Time >90% of HR(max) (UM: 16-17%; UF: 8-13%) and time spent with high speed running (4.1-5.1%) was similar for training with 2-14 players, but more high-intensity runs were performed with few players (UM 1v1: 140 +/- 17; UM 7v7: 97 +/- 5; P
PubMed ID
20149143 View in PubMed
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Afraid of medical care school-aged children's narratives about medical fear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147224
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2009
Author
Maria Forsner
Lilian Jansson
Anna Söderberg
Author Affiliation
Department of Health and Social Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden. mfr@du.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2009 Dec;24(6):519-28
Date
Dec-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Attitude of Health Personnel
Attitude to Health
Child
Child Psychology
Coercion
Fear - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Narration
Nurse's Role - psychology
Nursing Methodology Research
Pediatric Nursing
Play and Playthings - psychology
Power (Psychology)
Professional-Patient Relations
Social Support
Sweden
Thinking
Videotape Recording
Abstract
Fear can be problematic for children who come into contact with medical care. This study aimed to illuminate the meaning of being afraid when in contact with medical care, as narrated by children 7-11 years old. Nine children participated in the study, which applied a phenomenological hermeneutic analysis methodology. The children experienced medical care as "being threatened by a monster," but the possibility of breaking this spell of fear was also mediated. The findings indicate the important role of being emotionally hurt in a child's fear to create, together with the child, an alternate narrative of overcoming this fear.
PubMed ID
19931150 View in PubMed
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Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Digital Stories

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288394
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
  1 website  
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC)
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Interactive/Multimedia
Digital File Format
Web site (.html, .htm)
Keywords
Indigenous Collections
Health & Wellness
Health Resources
Alaska Natives,Videotape Recording
Abstract
Videos created by and for Alaska Natives on an assortment of health and wellness topics.
Online Resources
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Antenatal 'booking' interviews at midwifery clinics in Sweden: a qualitative analysis of five video-recorded interviews.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64472
Source
Midwifery. 1996 Jun;12(2):62-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1996
Author
P. Olsson
P O Sandman
L. Jansson
Source
Midwifery. 1996 Jun;12(2):62-72
Date
Jun-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Interviews
Male
Middle Aged
Nurse Midwives - psychology
Nurse-Patient Relations
Nursing Assessment
Nursing Methodology Research
Parents - psychology
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - methods
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Videotape Recording
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To describe antenatal 'booking' interviews as regards content and illuminate the meaning of the ways midwives and expectant parents relate to each other. DESIGN: Content analysis and phenomenological hermeneutic analysis of transcribed texts from five video-recorded antenatal booking interviews. SETTING: Midwifery clinics at five health centres in the context of Swedish primary care. PARTICIPANTS: Five midwives, five pregnant women (less than 14 weeks pregnant) and two expectant fathers. FINDINGS: A variety of content themes and ways of relating were found. Combined themes of biomedical and obstetric content occurred as frequently as the sum of social, emotional, antenatal care and life-style themes. The midwives' ways of relating formed two main themes; considering and disregarding the uniqueness of the expectant parents. The midwives directed the interview through their choice of content themes and the way they related to the expectant parents. The expectant parents mainly shadowed the midwives' content themes and ways of relating. The expectant fathers seemed like strange visitors in the women's world. Two perspectives of antenatal midwifery care, obstetric and parental, operated alternately and in competition within the interviews. KEY CONCLUSIONS: The content and the ways of relating within the interviews seem to be connected and could be understood in the light of Buber's writings on dialogue. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: The findings provide a basis for reflection on the education of midwives and the planning, training and implementation of midwifery care at antenatal 'booking' interviews.
PubMed ID
8718110 View in PubMed
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Applicability of the new ITKA GSD Basic 250 electrosurgical unit to urologic endoscopic surgery, laparoscopic surgery and urologic open surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21300
Source
J Med Eng Technol. 1998 Nov-Dec;22(6):270-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
O. Lukkarinen
P. Tuuttila
Author Affiliation
Department of Surgery, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Med Eng Technol. 1998 Nov-Dec;22(6):270-3
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Abdominal Muscles - surgery
Animals
Bladder - surgery
Bladder Diseases - surgery
Bladder Neoplasms - surgery
Comparative Study
Cystoscopy
Electrocoagulation - instrumentation
Electrosurgery - instrumentation
Endoscopes
Equipment Design
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - surgery
Laparoscopes
Lymph Node Excision
Male
Nephrectomy
Prostatectomy
Prostatic Neoplasms - surgery
Safety
Swine
Urologic Surgical Procedures - instrumentation
Videotape Recording - instrumentation
Wound Healing
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to assess the applicability of a new ITKA GSD Basic 250 electrosurgical unit (ESU) to urologic endoscopic surgery, laparoscopic surgery and open urologic surgery, its possible interference with videorecording and stray currents in healthy tissues. A new ITKA GSD Basic 250 ESU (test ESU) was used and compared to conventional ESU (Berchtold Elektrotom 390 as reference ESU). Experimental surgery was carried out on three female pigs, which underwent endoscopic, laparoscopic and open surgery. Altogether 29 patients underwent either endoscopic or open surgery with the test ESU. In experimental surgery, the ideal cutting and coagulation settings of the test ESU were in the range 15-25% for endoscopic surgery. In laparoscopic surgery, tissues were ideally resected and removed at 10-15% power settings. In open experimental surgery, the ideal power settings were 25-30%. In human surgery, the test ESU operated well at 25-35% power settings in endoscopic surgery, while in open surgery on humans the ideal settings were 25-35% in monopolar use and 20-25% in bipolar use. When used for endoscopic operations, the test ESU did not interfere with videorecording. Nor were any adverse effects seen in the surrounding tissues. The patients had neither early nor late complications. Histopathological findings revealed no differences in healing between the test ESU and reference ESU. Experimental and patient surgery showed the test ESU to be both safe and effective. It is suitable to be used in urologic endoscopic surgery, laparoscopic surgery and open urologic surgery. It does not interfere with videorecording or cause harmful stray currents in surrounding tissues. Power can be adjusted linearly and precisely. Low-power operation is also possible.
PubMed ID
9884930 View in PubMed
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Assessing interviewing skills: the simulated office oral examination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236230
Source
J Fam Pract. 1986 Dec;23(6):567-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1986
Author
R J Sawa
Source
J Fam Pract. 1986 Dec;23(6):567-71
Date
Dec-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Certification
Clinical Competence
Educational Measurement - methods
Family Practice - education
Humans
Interviews as Topic - standards
Medical History Taking - standards
Physician-Patient Relations
Videotape Recording
Abstract
The College of Family Physicians of Canada uses a simulated office oral examination to test candidates for certification in family medicine. This examination has been highly successful. An analysis of this instrument provides a description of skills required for a certificant of the college. Its basic outline can be used to assess residents' interviewing skills during training and to help prepare them for practice.
PubMed ID
3783098 View in PubMed
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Assessing the communication skills of carers working with multiple learning disabilities: a case study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119251
Source
Int J Lang Commun Disord. 2012 Nov-Dec;47(6):685-95
Publication Type
Article
Author
Katja Koski
Kaisa Launonen
Author Affiliation
Children's Therapy Centre Terapeija, Espoo, Finland. katja.koski@terapeija.fi
Source
Int J Lang Commun Disord. 2012 Nov-Dec;47(6):685-95
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Communication Disorders - psychology - therapy
Female
Finland
Gestures
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Language Therapy - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Learning Disorders - psychology - therapy
Male
Middle Aged
Observer Variation
Professional-Patient Relations
Program Evaluation
Speech Therapy - methods - standards - statistics & numerical data
Videotape Recording
Abstract
Speech and language therapists (SLTs) working with adults who have multiple learning disabilities and complex communication needs often deliver their care via indirect therapy where SLTs train carers to communicate with their clients. Yet, very little is known about how SLTs assess the carers' communication skills prior to the training even though the assessment should be the basis of this indirect therapy.
To explore the level of agreement between Finnish SLTs' assessments of carers as skilful communication partners for adults who have multiple learning disabilities and complex communication needs. To investigate which interaction strategies affect the SLTs' assessments.
Six SLTs with more than 15 years of experience in working with individuals with complex communication needs saw together ten video clips of interaction situations between a carer and an adult who had multiple learning disabilities (aged 17-50 years). The SLTs assessed the carers on a scale from one to ten. The SLTs discussed their selections before giving their final ratings. The data were analysed both quantitatively and qualitatively. The unanimity of SLTs' assessment was analysed with a test of Kendall's W. Furthermore, the frequencies of the carers' different communication acts were counted and these counts were compared with the mean of the carers' assessments. These results were further explored with the SLTs' justifications about their assessments.
SLTs did not fully agree on which of the carers were the most skilful interaction partners. Furthermore, the six SLTs were not unanimous about which carers' interaction strategies resulted in skilful communication. However, SLTs assessed those carers higher who used facilitative verbal acts. The carers used these verbal acts to involve themselves in the interests of the client.
This case study showed that Finnish SLTs seem to have different criteria about what is considered skilful communication between carers and clients who have multiple learning disabilities. Even though there might not be a single way of being a skilful interaction partner, this variable can be confusing to carers if they work with several SLTs and each of them offers different professional advice. Therefore, the results suggest a need for an assessment tool for evaluating the carers' interaction skills. In addition to this tool, it appears that SLTs also need further training to be able to perform this multifaceted task.
PubMed ID
23121527 View in PubMed
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Assessment of first-year veterinary students' communication skills using an objective structured clinical examination: the importance of context.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120966
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2012;39(3):304-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Kent G Hecker
Cindy L Adams
Jason B Coe
Author Affiliation
Department of Veterinary Clinical and Diagnostic Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Canada. kghecker@ucalgary.ca
Source
J Vet Med Educ. 2012;39(3):304-10
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alberta
Clinical Competence - standards
Communication
Education, Veterinary - standards
Educational Measurement - methods - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Reproducibility of Results
Schools, Veterinary - standards
Students, Health Occupations - psychology
Videotape Recording
Abstract
Communication skills are considered to be a core clinical skill in veterinary medicine and essential for practice success, including outcomes of care for patients and clients. While veterinary schools include communication skills training in their programs, there is minimal knowledge on how best to assess communication competence throughout the undergraduate program. The purpose of this study was to further our understanding of the reliability, utility, and suitability of a communication skills Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Specifically we wanted to (1) identify the greatest source of variability (student, rater, station, and track) within a first-year, four station OSCE using exam scores and scores from videotape review by two trained raters, and (2) determine the effect of different stations on students' communication skills performance. Reliability of the scores from both the exam data and the two expert raters was 0.50 and 0.46 respectively, with the greatest amount of variance attributable to student by station. The percentage of variance due to raters in the exam data was 16.35%, whereas the percentage of variance for the two expert raters was 0%. These results have three important implications. First, the results reinforce the need for communication educators to emphasize that use of communication skills is moderated by the context of the clinical interaction. Second, by increasing rater training the amount of error in the scores due to raters can be reduced and inter-rater reliability increases. Third, the communication assessment method (in this case the OSCE checklist) should be built purposefully, taking into consideration the context of the case.
PubMed ID
22951466 View in PubMed
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Audiovisual information affects informed choice and experience of information in antenatal Down syndrome screening--a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132557
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2012 Mar;86(3):390-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
Ulla Björklund
Anna Marsk
Charlotta Levin
Susanne Georgsson Öhman
Author Affiliation
Södersjukhuset, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
Patient Educ Couns. 2012 Mar;86(3):390-5
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Choice Behavior
Decision Support Techniques
Down Syndrome - diagnosis
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Informed consent
Intervention Studies
Mental Competency
Middle Aged
Mothers - education - psychology
Patient Education as Topic - methods
Pregnancy
Prenatal Care - methods
Prenatal Diagnosis - psychology
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Sweden
Videotape Recording
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the effects of an information film on making an informed choice regarding Down syndrome screening, and women's knowledge and experiences of information.
Randomized controlled trial including 184 women in the intervention group and 206 controls recruited from maternity units in Stockholm, Sweden. The intervention was an information film presented as a complement to written and verbal information. Data were collected via a questionnaire in gestational week 27. Three different measures were combined to measure informed choice: attitudes towards Down syndrome screening, knowledge about Down syndrome and Down syndrome screening, and uptake of CUB (combined ultrasound and biochemical screening).
In the intervention group 71.5% made an informed choice versus 62.4% in the control group. Women in the intervention group had significantly increased knowledge, and to a greater extent than the control group, experienced the information as being sufficient, comprehensible, and correct.
An information film tended to increase the number of women who made an informed choice about Down syndrome screening. Participants were more satisfied with the information received.
Access to correct, nondirective, and sufficient information is essential when making a choice about prenatal diagnostics. It is essential with equivalent information to all women.
PubMed ID
21807474 View in PubMed
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Autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy: an electroclinical study of a Norwegian family with ten affected members.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33508
Source
Epilepsia. 1999 Jan;40(1):88-92
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999
Author
K O Nakken
A. Magnusson
O K Steinlein
Author Affiliation
The National Center for Epilepsy, Sandvika, Norway.
Source
Epilepsia. 1999 Jan;40(1):88-92
Date
Jan-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Australia
Child
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 20 - genetics
Comparative Study
Electroencephalography - statistics & numerical data
Epilepsy, Frontal Lobe - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics
Family
Female
Humans
Italy
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Male
Middle Aged
Mutagenesis, Insertional
Mutation, Missense
Norway - epidemiology
Pedigree
Phenotype
Receptors, Cholinergic - genetics
Sleep - physiology
Telemetry
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Videotape Recording
Abstract
PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to describe in detail the electroclinical findings associated with a mutation in the acetylcholine receptor in a Norwegian family with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE). Furthermore, we compared the clinical features associated with this mutation with those of an Australian family with a different mutation at the same locus, as well as with those of eight Italian families with ADNFLE and without a verified mutation in this gene. METHODS: We obtained medical records from all of the 10 known affected members of the Norwegian family. A personal interview and a clinical neurologic examination were carried out in six of them. Interictal and ictal scalp EEG recordings were obtained in eight and three, respectively, computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging (CT/MRI) in five, and blood samples for genetic analysis in seven individuals. The clinical features after an insertion of a leucine residue in the alpha4 subunit of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptor are examined. Furthermore, the clinical features that accompany this insertion and the clinical features associated with a missense mutation (Ser248Phe) in the same gene were compared. RESULTS: All the affected individuals had a seizure semiology consistent with frontal lobe seizures. Their seizures started in childhood (mean age, 8 years) and were often misinterpreted as benign nocturnal parasomnias, nocturnal paroxysmal dystonia, or a psychiatric disorder. The affected family members were of normal intellect and showed no abnormalities at neurologic and neuroradiologic examinations. Interictal scalp EEG registrations were mostly normal, ictal scalp EEG registrations in three individuals revealed left frontal low-voltage epileptiform discharges in two, and only shallow arousal preceding the attack in one. Although the seizure susceptibility varied among the affected individuals, the epilepsy course was mostly benign. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with ADNFLE, either with the 776ins3 mutation or the Ser248Phe mutation, and those without any recognized mutation in the acetylcholine receptor, have strikingly homogeneous phenotypes, and it seems difficult to separate them on clinical grounds.
PubMed ID
9924907 View in PubMed
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201 records – page 1 of 21.