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Active and passive distraction in children undergoing wound dressings.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122420
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Apr;28(2):158-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2013
Author
Stefan Nilsson
Karin Enskär
Carina Hallqvist
Eva Kokinsky
Author Affiliation
School of Health Sciences, Borås University, Borås, Sweden. stefan_r.nilsson@hb.se
Source
J Pediatr Nurs. 2013 Apr;28(2):158-66
Date
Apr-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bandages - adverse effects
Candy
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Male
Pain - etiology - prevention & control
Stress, Psychological - prevention & control
Sweden
Video Games
Wounds and Injuries - nursing
Abstract
The aim of this study was to test how distraction influences pain, distress and anxiety in children during wound care. Sixty participants aged 5-12 years were randomized to three groups: serious gaming, the use of lollipops and a control group. Self-reported pain, distress, anxiety and observed pain behaviour were recorded in conjunction with wound care. Serious gaming, an active distraction, reduced the observed pain behaviour and self-reported distress compared with the other groups. A sense of control and engagement in the distraction, together, may be the explanation for the different pain behaviours when children use serious gaming.
PubMed ID
22819747 View in PubMed
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Adolescent neck and shoulder pain--the association with depression, physical activity, screen-based activities, and use of health care services.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature262816
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Sep;55(3):366-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Solbjørg Makalani Myrtveit
Børge Sivertsen
Jens Christoffer Skogen
Lisbeth Frostholm
Kjell Morten Stormark
Mari Hysing
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2014 Sep;55(3):366-72
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Health Services - utilization
Cell Phones - utilization
Depression - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Internet - utilization
Male
Motor Activity
Neck Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Shoulder Pain - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Television - utilization
Video Games - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Neck and shoulder pain is frequent in adolescents, and multiple factors seem to affect the risk of such symptoms. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of neck and shoulder pain in Norwegian adolescence and to examine whether behavioral and emotional factors were associated with the risk of neck and shoulder pain. Finally we aimed to investigate whether neck and shoulder pain was related to the use of health services.
Data from the population-based study ung@hordaland were used. Participants were asked how often during the last 6 months they had experienced neck and shoulder pain. The association between frequent neck and shoulder pain and physical activity, symptoms of depression, and screen-based activities was evaluated using logistic regression analyses stratified by gender. The relative risk of visiting health services when reporting neck and shoulder pain was calculated using multiple logistic regression analyses.
Frequent neck and shoulder pain was reported by 20.0% (1,797 of the total 8,990) and more often by girls than boys (p
PubMed ID
24746679 View in PubMed
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Adolescents' prospective screen time by gender and parental education, the mediation of parental influences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112462
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:89
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Torunn H Totland
Mona Bjelland
Nanna Lien
Ingunn H Bergh
Mekdes K Gebremariam
May Grydeland
Yngvar Ommundsen
Lene F Andersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, University of Oslo, NO-0316 Oslo, Norway. t.h.totland@medisin.uio.no
Source
Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act. 2013;10:89
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Adult
Child
Child Behavior
Computers
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Fathers
Female
Gender Identity
Health Behavior
Humans
Linear Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mothers
Norway
Parent-Child Relations
Parenting
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Sedentary lifestyle
Self Report
Sex Factors
Television
Video Games
Abstract
The present study investigated associations in gender dyads of parents' and adolescents' time spent on television and video viewing (TV/DVD), and computer and electronic game use (PC/games) at the ages of 11 and 13 years. Possible mediating effects of parental modelling and parental regulation in the relationship between parental education and adolescents' prospective TV/DVD and PC/game time were further examined.
A total of 908 adolescents, participating at both ages 11 and 13 years in the Norwegian HEalth In Adolescents (HEIA) cohort study (2007-2009), were included in the analyses. Data on adolescents', mothers' and fathers' self reported time spent on TV/DVD and PC/games were measured at both time points by questionnaires. Correlation coefficients were used to examine gender dyads of parents' and adolescents' reports. Mediation analyses using linear regression investigated possible mediation effects of parental modelling and parental regulation in the prospective relationship between parental education and adolescents' time spent on TV/DVD and PC/games between the ages of 11 and 13 years.
Correlations of screen time behaviours in gender dyads of parents and adolescents showed significant associations in time spent on TV/DVD at the age of 11 and 13 years. Associations between mothers and sons and between fathers and daughters were also observed in time spent on PC/games at the age of 11 years. Maternal and paternal modelling was further found to mediate the relationship between parental education and adolescents' prospective TV/DVD time between the ages of 11 and 13 years. No mediation effect was observed for parental regulation, however a decrease in both maternal and paternal regulation at the age of 11 years significantly predicted more TV/DVD time among adolescents at the age of 13 years.
Cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships were observed in gender dyads of parents' and adolescents' screen time behaviours at the ages of 11 and 13 years, and further studies including both parents and their children should be emphasized. Moreover, maternal and paternal modelling were found to be important target variables in interventions aiming to reduce social differences by parental education in adolescents' prospective time spent on TV/DVD.
Notes
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Cites: Acta Paediatr. 2013 Feb;102(2):199-20523121043
PubMed ID
23829607 View in PubMed
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An analysis of the accessibility of video lottery terminals: the case of Montréal.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature159281
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2008;7:2
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Eric Robitaille
Patrick Herjean
Author Affiliation
Centre de recherche Léa-Roback sur les inégalités sociales de santé de Montréal, Université de Montréal, 1301, rue Sherbrooke Est, Montréal, Canada. eric.robitaille@umontreal.ca
Source
Int J Health Geogr. 2008;7:2
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cluster analysis
Commerce - economics - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Financing, Government
Gambling - psychology
Geographic Information Systems
Geography
Humans
Male
Poverty Areas
Public Policy
Quebec - epidemiology
Residence Characteristics - classification
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Social Environment
Urban health
Video Games - economics - psychology - supply & distribution
Vulnerable Populations - psychology
Abstract
Researchers and public health officials in Canada, the United States and Australia have for some time noted broader geographic accessibility to gambling establishments, above all in socioeconomically underprivileged communities. This increase in availability could lead to more and more gambling problems. This article focuses, in an ecological perspective, in particular on a spatial analysis of the geographic accessibility of sites possessing a VLT permit in the Montréal area, i.e. Montréal Island, the South Shore and Laval, from the standpoint of the development of an indicator of the vulnerability (socioeconomic components and demographic components) to gambling of populations at the level of certain neighbourhood units (dissemination areas). With the recent development of geographic information systems (GIS), it is now possible to ascertain accessibility to services much more accurately, for example by taking into account the configuration of the road network.
The findings of our analysis reveal widespread geographic accessibility to sites possessing a VLT permit in the downtown area and in pericentral districts. In some neighbourhood units, a site possessing a VLT permit may be within a three-minute walk. In the region studied overall, average walking time to a VLT site is nine minutes. Access to this type of service on foot is usually limited in the outskirts. However, a number of groups of sites possessing VLT permits are found along certain axial highways. According to local spatial self-correlation analyses, the findings suggest a significant link between walking accessibility to sites possessing VLT permits and the vulnerability of the communities. In a number of neighbourhood units with ready access to VLT's the populations display high vulnerability.
These findings reveal that accessibility to sites possessing a VLT permit is often linked to the vulnerability (socioeconomic and demographic components) of communities. Reliance in our analyses on neighbourhood units with fairly small areas enabled us to emphasize the rectilinear dimension of the spatial distribution of sites possessing VLT permits. This is a significant link that public health officials must consider when elaborating programs to combat pathological gambling.
Notes
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PubMed ID
18205923 View in PubMed
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An online spaced-education game to teach and assess residents: a multi-institutional prospective trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128179
Source
J Am Coll Surg. 2012 Mar;214(3):367-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
B Price Kerfoot
Harley Baker
Author Affiliation
Surgical Service (Urology Section), Veterans Affairs Boston Healthcare System, Boston, MA, USA. price.kerfoot@gmail.com
Source
J Am Coll Surg. 2012 Mar;214(3):367-73
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Canada
Educational Measurement - methods
Female
Humans
Internship and Residency
Male
Online Systems
Prospective Studies
United States
Urology - education
Video Games
Abstract
While games are frequently used in resident education, there is little evidence supporting their efficacy. We investigated whether a spaced-education (SE) game can be both a reliable and valid method of assessing residents' knowledge and an effective means of teaching core content.
The SE game consisted of 100 validated multiple-choice questions and explanations on core urology content. Residents were sent 2 questions each day via email. Adaptive game mechanics re-sent the questions in 2 or 6 weeks if answered incorrectly and correctly, respectively. Questions expired if not answered on time (appointment dynamic). Residents retired questions by answering each correctly twice in a row (progression dynamic). Competition was fostered by posting relative performance among residents. Main outcomes measures were baseline scores (percentage of questions answered correctly on initial presentation) and completion scores (percentage of questions retired).
Nine hundred thirty-one US and Canadian residents enrolled in the 45-week trial. Cronbach alpha reliability for the SE baseline scores was 0.87. Baseline scores (median 62%, interquartile range [IQR] 17%) correlated with scores on the 2008 American Urological Association in-service examination (ISE08), 2009 American Board of Urology qualifying examination (QE09), and ISE09 (r = 0.76, 0.46, and 0.64, respectively; all p
PubMed ID
22225647 View in PubMed
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Association between neighborhood socioeconomic status and screen time among pre-school children: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142642
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:367
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Valerie Carson
John C Spence
Nicoleta Cutumisu
Lindsey Cargill
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, E-488 Van Vliet Center, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB T6G2H9, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2010;10:367
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alberta
Child Behavior
Child, Preschool
Computers - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Humans
Leisure Activities
Linear Models
Logistic Models
Male
Parents - psychology
Residence Characteristics - classification
Sedentary lifestyle
Social Class
Television - utilization
Time Factors
Video Games - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Sedentary behavior is considered a separate construct from physical activity and engaging in sedentary behaviors results in health effects independent of physical activity levels. A major source of sedentary behavior in children is time spent viewing TV or movies, playing video games, and using computers. To date no study has examined the impact of neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES) on pre-school children's screen time behavior.
Proxy reports of weekday and weekend screen time (TV/movies, video games, and computer use) were completed by 1633 parents on their 4-5 year-old children in Edmonton, Alberta between November, 2005 and August, 2007. Postal codes were used to classified neighborhoods into low, medium or high SES. Multiple linear and logistic regression models were conducted to examine relationships between screen time and neighborhood SES.
Girls living in low SES neighborhoods engaged in significantly more weekly overall screen time and TV/movie minutes compared to girls living in high SES neighborhoods. The same relationship was not observed in boys. Children living in low SES neighborhoods were significantly more likely to be video game users and less likely to be computer users compared to children living in high SES neighborhoods. Also, children living in medium SES neighborhoods were significantly less likely to be computer users compared to children living in high SES neighborhoods.
Some consideration should be given to providing alternative activity opportunities for children, especially girls who live in lower SES neighborhoods. Also, future research should continue to investigate the independent effects of neighborhood SES on screen time as well as the potential mediating variables for this relationship.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20573262 View in PubMed
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Associations between factors within the home setting and screen time among children aged 0-5?years: a cross-sectional study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122377
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:539
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Valerie Carson
Ian Janssen
Author Affiliation
School of Kinesiology and Health Studies, Queen's University, Kingston, ON, Canada.
Source
BMC Public Health. 2012;12:539
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Child, Preschool
Computers - utilization
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Housing - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Male
Models, Psychological
Ontario
Parent-Child Relations
Questionnaires
Regression Analysis
Risk factors
Social Environment
Television - utilization
Time Factors
Video Games - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Excessive engagement in screen time has several immediate and long-term health implications among pre-school children. However, little is known about the factors that influence screen time in this age group. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to use the Ecologic Model of Sedentary Behavior as a guide to examine associations between intrapersonal, interpersonal, and physical environment factors within the home setting and screen time among pre-school children.
Participants were 746 pre-school children (= 5?years old) from the Kingston, Ontario, Canada area. From May to September, 2011, parents completed a questionnaire regarding several intrapersonal (child demographics), interpersonal (family demographics, parental cognitions, parental behavior), and physical environment (television, computer, or video games in the bedroom) factors within the home setting. Parents also reported the average amount of time per day their child spent watching television and playing video/computer games. Associations were examined using linear and logistic regression models.
Most participants (93.7%) watched television and 37.9% played video/computer games. Several intrapersonal, interpersonal, and physical environment factors within the home setting were associated with screen time. More specifically, age, parental attitudes, parental barriers, parental descriptive norms, parental screen time, and having a television in the bedroom were positive predictors of screen time; whereas, parental education, parental income, and parental self-efficacy were negative predictors of screen time in the linear regression analysis. Collectively these variables explained 64.2% of the variance in screen time. Parental cognitive factors (self-efficacy, attitudes, barriers, descriptive norms) at the interpersonal level explained a large portion (37.9%) of this variance.
A large proportion of screen time in pre-school children was explained by factors within the home setting. Parental cognitive factors at the interpersonal level were of particular relevance. These findings suggest that interventions aiming to foster appropriate screen time habits in pre-school children may be most effective if they target parents for behavioral change.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22823887 View in PubMed
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Associations between problematic gaming and psychiatric symptoms among adolescents in two samples.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature288191
Source
Addict Behav. 2016 10;61:8-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
10-2016
Author
Sofia Vadlin
Cecilia Åslund
Charlotta Hellström
Kent W Nilsson
Source
Addict Behav. 2016 10;61:8-15
Date
10-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Anxiety Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Attention Deficit Disorder with Hyperactivity - epidemiology - psychology
Behavior, Addictive - epidemiology - psychology
Comorbidity
Depressive Disorder - epidemiology - psychology
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders - epidemiology - psychology
Sex Factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Video Games - psychology
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate associations between problematic gaming and psychiatric symptoms among adolescents. Data from adolescents in the SALVe cohort, including adolescents in Västmanland who were born in 1997 and 1999 (N=1868; 1034 girls), and data from consecutive adolescent psychiatric outpatients in Västmanland (N=242; 169 girls) were analyzed. Adolescents self-rated on the Gaming Addiction Identification Test (GAIT), Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale Adolescent version (ASRS-A), Depression Self-Rating Scale Adolescent version (DSRS-A), Spence Children's Anxiety Scale (SCAS), and psychotic-like experiences (PLEs). Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed, and adjusted for sex, age, study population, school bullying, family maltreatment, and interactions by sex, with two-way interactions between psychiatric measurements. Boys had higher self-rated problematic gaming in both samples, whereas girls self-rated higher in all psychiatric domains. Boys had more than eight times the probability, odds ratio (OR), of having problematic gaming. Symptoms of ADHD, depression and anxiety were associated with ORs of 2.43 (95% CI 1.44-4.11), 2.47 (95% CI 1.44-4.25), and 2.06 (95% CI 1.27-3.33), respectively, in relation to coexisting problematic gaming. Problematic gaming was associated with psychiatric symptoms in adolescents; when problematic gaming is considered, the probability of coexisting psychiatric symptoms should also be considered, and vice versa.
PubMed ID
27203825 View in PubMed
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Associations of Physical Activity, Sports Participation and Active Commuting on Mathematic Performance and Inhibitory Control in Adolescents.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature274239
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(1):e0146319
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Sidsel L Domazet
Jakob Tarp
Tao Huang
Anne Kær Gejl
Lars Bo Andersen
Karsten Froberg
Anna Bugge
Source
PLoS One. 2016;11(1):e0146319
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actigraphy
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior
Anthropometry
Bicycling
Breakfast
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Educational Status
Female
Games, Experimental
Humans
Male
Mathematics
Motor Activity
Obesity - epidemiology
Psychomotor Performance
Reaction Time
Sports
Transportation
Video Games
Abstract
To examine objectively measured physical activity level, organized sports participation and active commuting to school in relation to mathematic performance and inhibitory control in adolescents.
The design was cross-sectional. A convenient sample of 869 sixth and seventh grade students (12-14 years) was invited to participate in the study. A total of 568 students fulfilled the inclusion criteria and comprised the final sample for this study. Mathematic performance was assessed by a customized test and inhibitory control was assessed by a modified Eriksen flanker task. Physical activity was assessed with GT3X and GT3X+ accelerometers presented in sex-specific quartiles of mean counts per minute and mean minutes per day in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity. Active commuting and sports participation was self-reported. Mixed model regression was applied. Total physical activity level was stratified by bicycling status in order to bypass measurement error subject to the accelerometer.
Non-cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute displayed a higher mathematic score, so did cyclists in the 2nd and 3rd quartile of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity relative to the least active quartile. Non-cyclists in the 3rd quartile of counts per minute had an improved reaction time and cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity displayed an improved accuracy, whereas non-cyclists in the 2nd quartile of counts per minute showed an inferior accuracy relative to the least active quartile. Bicycling to school and organized sports participation were positively associated with mathematic performance.
Sports participation and bicycling were positively associated with mathematic performance. Results regarding objectively measured physical activity were mixed. Although, no linear nor dose-response relationship was observed there was no indication of a higher activity level impairing the scholastic or cognitive performance.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26727211 View in PubMed
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At-risk and problem gambling among adolescents: a convenience sample of first-year junior high school students in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266467
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2015;10:9
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Sari Castrén
Marjut Grainger
Tuuli Lahti
Hannu Alho
Anne H Salonen
Source
Subst Abuse Treat Prev Policy. 2015;10:9
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adolescent Behavior - psychology
Child
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Family - psychology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Gambling - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Humans
Male
Peer Group
Prevalence
Psychometrics
Risk factors
Schools
Sex Factors
Students - psychology
Substance-Related Disorders - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Video Games - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Adolescent gambling and substance use are viewed as a public health concern internationally. The early onset age of gambling is a known risk factor for developing gambling problems later in life. The aims of this study are: to evaluate the internal consistency reliability, factorial validity and classification accuracy of the Finnish version of DSM-IV-Multiple Response-Juvenile (DSM-IV-MR-J) criteria measuring at-risk/problem gambling (ARPG); to examine gender differences in gambling participation, ARPG and substance use among first-year junior high school students; and to investigate the association of gambling and gaming (video game playing) participation, substance use and social variables with ARPG.
This study examined 988 adolescents (mean age 13.4 years) at 11 public schools in Finland between October-December 2013. The response rate was 91.6%. Chi-squared test and binary logistic regression analysis were used.
'Illegal acts' was the most endorsed and sensitive, but the least specific criteria identifying ARPG. During the past year, 51.6% of the respondents had gambled, 7.9% were identified as at-risk/problem gamblers (DSM-IV-MR-J score?=?2), 8.0% had smoked and 8.9% had been drinking for intoxication, and the first three were significantly more common among boys than girls. The odds ratio of being a male past-year at-risk/problem gambler was 2.27, 5.78 for gambling often or sometimes, 2.42 for video game playing weekly or more often and 6.23 for having peer gamblers.
Overall, the Finnish version of the DSM-IV-MR-J had acceptable internal consistency reliability and factorial validity. None of the DSM-IV-MR-J criteria were accurate enough to screen ARPG per se. ARPG past-year prevalence was relatively high with males gambling more than females. ARPG was as common as drinking alcohol for intoxication and smoking. Peer gambling was strongly associated with ARPG. Efficient strategies to minimise the risks of gambling problems, tools for prevention and identification of ARPG among the underage are needed.
Notes
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PubMed ID
25879923 View in PubMed
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