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Changes in food group consumption and associations with self-rated diet, health, life satisfaction, and mental and physical functioning over 5 years in very old Canadian men: the Manitoba Follow-Up Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature119755
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2012 Aug;16(8):707-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
S. Caligiuri
C. Lengyel
R. Tate
Author Affiliation
Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, 405 Human Ecology Building, 35 Chancellors Circle, Winnipeg, MB, R3T 2N2 Canada. umcaligs@cc.umanitoba.ca
Source
J Nutr Health Aging. 2012 Aug;16(8):707-12
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging - psychology
Cohort Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Follow-Up Studies
Frail Elderly - psychology
Health promotion
Health status
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Manitoba
Mental health
Patient compliance
Personal Satisfaction
Prospective Studies
Self Report
Veterans Health
Abstract
To identify longitudinal food group consumption trends and the relationship to perceived changes in diet, health, and functioning.
A prospective longitudinal study.
Canada.
Seven hundred and thirty-six community-dwelling Canadian men (mean age: 2000=79.4 yrs; 2005=84.5 yrs) participating in the Manitoba Follow-up Study.
Self-reported food consumption, self-rated diet and health, life satisfaction, physical and mental functioning from questionnaires completed in 2000 and 2005.
The majority of participants did not consume from all four food groups daily, based on Canada's Food Guide recommendations, with only 8% in 2000 and up to 15% in 2005. However, over a five year period, more men improved their consumption in each food group than declined. An association was found between change in the self-rating of the healthiness of their diet and change in consumption of vegetables and fruit, or grain products. Men whose self-rating of the healthiness of their diet remained high or improved between 2000 and 2005, were 2.15 times more likely (95% CI=1.45, 3.17) to also have increased consumption of vegetables and fruit, and 1.71 times more likely (95% CI=1.51, 2.54) to have increased consumption of grain products, relative to men whose self-rating of the healthiness of their diet declined between 2000 and 2005. Men who consumed more food groups daily had better mental and physical component scores.
Dietary improvements are possible in very old men. Greater daily food group consumption is associated with better mental and physical functioning. Given these positive findings, there is still a need to identify older men who require support to improve their dietary habits as nearly half of the participants consumed two or fewer groups daily.
PubMed ID
23076513 View in PubMed
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[Complex estimation of the state of health, quality of life, level of psychological adaptation and rates of senescence of war veterans, suffering from arterial hypertension].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256454
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(1):124-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
N O Zakharova
O G Iakovlev
E V Treneva
Source
Adv Gerontol. 2014;27(1):124-8
Date
2014
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological - physiology
Aging, Premature - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Hypertension - complications - diagnosis - psychology
Male
Middle Aged
Psychophysiologic Disorders - epidemiology - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Quality of Life
Questionnaires
Russia - epidemiology
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - complications - epidemiology - physiopathology
Veterans - psychology
Veterans Health - statistics & numerical data
War
Abstract
The article presents some aspects of the health status of the veterans of the Samara region. Intercommunication is marked between the level of social adaptation, quality of life and rate aging combatants. The study shows the effect of chronic posttraumatic stress disorder on the occurrence of psychosomatic pathology and development of senescence combat veterans suffering from arterial hypertension.
PubMed ID
25051769 View in PubMed
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Determinants of changes in self-rated health among Finnish war veterans: results from the Veteran Project 1992 and 2004 surveys.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130219
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Sep-Oct;55(2):343-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
Riitta Leskinen
Riitta Antikainen
Markku Peltonen
Risto Sippola
Pekka Jousilahti
Tiina Laatikainen
Author Affiliation
Oulu Deaconess Institute, PO Box 365, FI-90101 Oulu, Finland. riitta.leskinen@oulu.fi
Source
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2012 Sep-Oct;55(2):343-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cardiovascular Diseases - epidemiology
Disabled persons - statistics & numerical data
Fatigue - epidemiology
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Health status
Humans
Institutionalization - statistics & numerical data
Male
Mobility Limitation
Musculoskeletal Diseases - epidemiology
Nervous System Diseases - epidemiology
Self Report
Veterans Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Self-rated health is a strong predictor of mortality, morbidity, future functional capacity and the quality of life. Measures of self-rated health have been collected fairly regularly since the 1980s, but few of them focus on self-rated health among the elderly war veterans. The aim of this study was to examine changes in self-rated health among Finnish war veterans from 1992 to 2004 and to analyze the independent determinants associated with changes in veterans' self-rated health. The study population was 4999 veterans living in Finland, who participated in data collection of both the Veteran Project 1992 and 2004. Logistic regression models were used to identify independent predictors for changes in self-rated health. Analyses were conducted separately for men with and without disability and for women. During the follow-up, self-rated health improved or remained unchanged among 88.8% of the men without disability, 90.5% of the men with disability and 87.9% of the women. Determinants for declined self-rated health were a new cardiovascular disease (CVD) among all veteran groups, increased walking difficulties among men without disability and women, a new neurological disease and institutionalization among men without disability, and a new musculoskeletal disease among men with disability. In conclusion, the majority of veterans rated their health improved or unchanged during the follow-up. The importance of mobility impairments and cardiovascular, musculoskeletal and neurological diseases as the predictors of declined self-rated health were confirmed.
PubMed ID
22023880 View in PubMed
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The differences between self-care practices of Alaskan veterans with back pain

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature293245
Publication Type
Dissertation
Date
2000
Author
Hofbauer, Mary M
Date
2000
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Dissertation
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Backache -- Alternative treatment
Self-care, Health
Veterans -- Health and hygiene -- Alaska
Notes
RD 771.B217 2000
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Health-related quality of life of Canadian Forces veterans after transition to civilian life.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114412
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Jan-Feb;104(1):e15-21
Publication Type
Article
Author
Jim Thompson
Wilma Hopman
Jill Sweet
Linda VanTil
Mary Beth MacLean
Elizabeth VanDenKerkhof
Kerry Sudom
Alain Poirier
David Pedlar
Author Affiliation
Research Directorate, Veterans Affairs Canada, Charlottetown, PE. jim.thompson@vac-acc.gc.ca
Source
Can J Public Health. 2013 Jan-Feb;104(1):e15-21
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Psychological
Adult
Aged
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Female
Health Surveys
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Quality of Life - psychology
Risk factors
Socioeconomic Factors
Veterans - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Veterans Health - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
Describe health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of former Canadian Forces (CF) men and women in uniform (Veterans) after transition to civilian life, and compare to age- and sex-adjusted Canadian norms.
The 2010 Survey on Transition to Civilian Life was a national computer-assisted telephone survey of CF Regular Force personnel who released during 1998-2007. HRQoL was assessed using the SF-12 Physical (PCS) and Mental (MCS) Component Summary scores. Descriptive analysis of HRQoL was conducted for socio-demographic, health, disability and determinants of health characteristics.
Mean age was 46 years (range 20-67). Compared to age- and sex-adjusted Canadian averages, PCS (47.3) was low and MCS was similar (52.0). PCS and MCS were variably below average for middle age groups and lowest for non-commissioned ranks, widowed/divorced/separated, 10-19 years of service, physical and mental health conditions, disability, dissatisfaction with finances, seeking work/not working, low social support and difficulty adjusting to civilian life. Among Veterans Affairs Canada clients, 83% had below-average physical PCS, 49% had below-average MCS, and mean PCS (38.2) was significantly lower than mean MCS (48.3).
HRQoL varied across a range of biopsychosocial factors, suggesting possible protective factors and vulnerable subgroups that may benefit from targeted interventions. These findings will be of interest to agencies supporting Veterans in transition to civilian life and to researchers developing hypotheses to better understand well-being in Canadian Veterans.
PubMed ID
23618114 View in PubMed
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Providing culturally competent services for American Indian and Alaska Native veterans to reduce health care disparities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257090
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Sep;104 Suppl 4:S548-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2014
Author
Timothy D Noe
Carol E Kaufman
L Jeanne Kaufmann
Elizabeth Brooks
Jay H Shore
Author Affiliation
The authors are with the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Rural Health, Veterans Rural Health Resource Center-Western Region, Native Domain, and the Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, School of Public Health, University of Colorado, Denver.
Source
Am J Public Health. 2014 Sep;104 Suppl 4:S548-54
Date
Sep-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Communication
Cultural Competency
Health Services Accessibility - organization & administration
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American
Inuits
Leadership
Organizational Innovation
Program Evaluation
United States
United States Department of Veterans Affairs - organization & administration
Veterans
Veterans Health
Abstract
We conducted an exploratory study to determine what organizational characteristics predict the provision of culturally competent services for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) veterans in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) health facilities.
In 2011 to 2012, we adapted the Organizational Readiness to Change Assessment (ORCA) for a survey of 27 VA facilities in the Western Region to assess organizational readiness and capacity to adopt and implement native-specific services and to profile the availability of AI/AN veteran programs and interest in and resources for such programs.
Several ORCA subscales (Program Needs, Leader's Practices, and Communication) statistically significantly predicted whether VA staff perceived that their facilities were meeting the needs of AI/AN veterans. However, none predicted greater implementation of native-specific services.
Our findings may aid in developing strategies for adopting and implementing promising native-specific programs and services for AI/AN veterans, and may be generalizable for other veteran groups.
Notes
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Cites: J Rural Health. 2008 Fall;24(4):337-4419007387
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Cites: Healthc Financ Manage. 2005 May;59(5):112-315938359
PubMed ID
25100420 View in PubMed
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Rural American Indian and Alaska Native veterans' telemental health: A model of culturally centered care.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291579
Source
Psychol Serv. 2017 Aug; 14(3):270-278
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
Cynthia W Goss
W J Buck Richardson
Nancy Dailey
Byron Bair
Herbert Nagamoto
Spero M Manson
Jay H Shore
Author Affiliation
Veterans Rural Health Resource Center.
Source
Psychol Serv. 2017 Aug; 14(3):270-278
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Alaska Natives
Culturally Competent Care
Health Services Accessibility
Health services needs and demand
Humans
Indians, North American
Mental health services
Models, Theoretical
Rural Population
Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic - psychology - therapy
Telemedicine
United States
United States Department of Veterans Affairs
Veterans - psychology
Veterans Health
Abstract
American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) veterans living in rural areas have unique health care needs and face numerous barriers to accessing health care services. Among these needs is a disproportionate prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder and other mental illnesses. Since 2001, 14 rural communities have partnered with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and the Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus to extend telemental health clinics to American Indian veterans. Administrative and, to some extent, clinical considerations of these clinics have been reviewed previously. This paper describes a model of care, evolved over a 14-year period, that weaves together evidence-based Western treatment, traditional Native healing, and rural Native communities into 4 main components: mental health care, technology, care coordination, and cultural facilitation. We delineate improvements to care made by addressing barriers such as system transference, provider-patient trust, and videoconferencing. Similarly, the discussion notes ways that the care model leverages strengths within Native communities, such as social cohesion and spirituality. Future steps include selection of appropriate performance indicators for systematic evaluation. The identification of key constructs of this care model will facilitate comparisons with other models of care in underserved populations with chronic and complex health conditions, and eventually advance the state of care for our warriors. (PsycINFO Database Record
PubMed ID
28805411 View in PubMed
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[The stages of development of cardiovascular diseases and the evolution of their pattern in the veterans of the Great Patriotic War (according to the 1946-2015 records of the Saint Petersburg War Veterans Hospital)].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271954
Source
Ter Arkh. 2016;88(1):17-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
M Yu Kabanov
Z D Shvartsman
E M Ageenko
Yu E Zaitsev
I L Semenova
Source
Ter Arkh. 2016;88(1):17-22
Date
2016
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiovascular Diseases - diagnosis - epidemiology - therapy
Comorbidity - trends
Female
Hospitalization - statistics & numerical data
Hospitals, Veterans - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Russia - epidemiology
Veterans - statistics & numerical data
Veterans Health - statistics & numerical data - trends
World War II
Abstract
To determine the stages of development of cardiovascular diseases and the evolution of their pattern in the veterans of the Great Patriotic War during 70 postwar years.
The investigation used the 1946-2014 annual reports on the hospital's work; analysis of the pattern of therapeutic and cardiovascular diseases over time; the results of laboratory and functional tests in 148 patients who developed in-hospital myocardial infarction (cardiospecific enzymes, electrocardiography, echocardiography (EchoCG), and, if clinically indicated, coronary angiography) and in 112 cardiopulmonary patients who were detected to have a chronic multimorbid heart phenomenon (EchoCG, radiological examination, blood gas tests, and statistical processing of the findings).
The postwar evolution of therapeutic and cardiovascular diseases was ascertained to consist of 5 stages, each of which averaged about 15 years. At the same time, the nosological entities typical of the subsequent stage developed in the pattern of those at the preceding stage and gradually became predominant. The form of in-hospital myocardial infarction, as well as the chronic multimorbid heart phenomenon in the presence of comorbidity (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and hypertensive disease) at Stage IV was described.
With allowance made for the stages of development of therapeutic diseases and evolution of its pattern in the veterans of the Great Patriotic War, the clinical departments of the hospital, its laboratory and functional diagnosis departments have been reorganized for 70 postwar years in order to render adequate specialized medical care to the patients.
PubMed ID
26978604 View in PubMed
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9 records – page 1 of 1.