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274 records – page 1 of 28.

Abnormal echocardiography in patients with type 2 diabetes and relation to symptoms and clinical characteristics.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286353
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2016 Sep;13(5):321-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2016
Author
Peter Godsk Jørgensen
Magnus T Jensen
Rasmus Mogelvang
Bernt Johan von Scholten
Jan Bech
Thomas Fritz-Hansen
Søren Galatius
Tor Biering-Sørensen
Henrik U Andersen
Tina Vilsbøll
Peter Rossing
Jan S Jensen
Source
Diab Vasc Dis Res. 2016 Sep;13(5):321-30
Date
Sep-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Denmark - epidemiology
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - epidemiology
Diastole
Echocardiography, Doppler
Electrocardiography
Female
Humans
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - physiopathology
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Predictive value of tests
Prevalence
Risk factors
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - diagnostic imaging - epidemiology - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
We aimed to determine the prevalence of echocardiographic abnormalities and their relation to clinical characteristics and cardiac symptoms in a large, contemporary cohort of patients with type 2 diabetes.
A total of 1030 patients with type 2 diabetes participated. Echocardiographic abnormalities were present in 513 (49.8%) patients, mainly driven by a high prevalence of diastolic dysfunction 178 (19.4%), left ventricular hypertrophy 213 (21.0%) and left atrial enlargement, 200 (19.6%). The prevalence increased markedly with age from 31.1% in the youngest group (75?years) (p?
PubMed ID
27208801 View in PubMed
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ACE inhibitors captopril and enalapril induce regression of left ventricular hypertrophy in hypertensive patients with chronic renal failure.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54522
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1997 May;12(5):945-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1997
Author
A I Dyadyk
A E Bagriy
I A Lebed
N F Yarovaya
E V Schukina
G G Taradin
Author Affiliation
Department of Postgraduate Therapy Training, Medical University, Donetsk, Ukraine.
Source
Nephrol Dial Transplant. 1997 May;12(5):945-51
Date
May-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Captopril - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Diastole - drug effects
Drug Tolerance
Enalapril - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Female
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - complications - drug therapy - physiopathology
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - complications - drug therapy - pathology
Kidney Failure, Chronic - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Single-Blind Method
Systole - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Left ventricular hypertrophy is frequently noted in patients with moderate to severe chronic renal failure not requiring dialysis. Recently, several studies have shown reversal of myocardial hypertrophy in end-stage renal disease with long-term pharmacological control of blood pressure, but it is unclear whether left ventricular mass regresses or normalizes with antihypertensive treatment of patients with earlier stages of chronic renal failure. METHODS: Seventy-two undialysed patients with chronic renal failure, chronic mild-to-moderate hypertension, and left ventricular hypertrophy were randomly assigned in a prospective study to either the captopril (n = 36) or enalapril group (n = 36). Blood pressure measurements, echocardiographic and Doppler parameters were evaluated before treatment and at 6 and 12 months of therapy. RESULTS: During follow-up, six patients developed side-effects including dry cough, taste disturbances, skin rash and gastric intolerance. In the captopril group there was a decrease in mean left ventricular mass index by 12% after 6 months of treatment, which decreased by 20% after 12 months treatment. For enalapril, the average reduction of myocardial mass after 6 months treatment was 14% and after 12 months treatment, the decrease was 19%. In both treatment groups there was significant improvement of left ventricular filling dynamics. No deterioration of left ventricular systolic function was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Our results confirm that antihypertensive monotherapy with the ACE inhibitors, captopril and enalapril, in patients with chronic renal failure results in regression of left ventricular mass index associated with a significant improvement in the diastolic function of the left ventricle without a demonstrable deterioration in left ventricular systolic performance.
PubMed ID
9175047 View in PubMed
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Acute administration of a single dose of valsartan improves left ventricular functions: a pilot study to assess the role of tissue velocity echocardiography in patients with systemic arterial hypertension in the TVE-valsartan study I.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80206
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2006 Nov;26(6):351-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2006
Author
Govind Satish C
Brodin Lars-Ake
Nowak Jacek
Ramesh S S
Saha Samir K
Author Affiliation
BMJ Heart Center, Department of Non-invasive Cardiology, Bangalore, India.
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2006 Nov;26(6):351-6
Date
Nov-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antihypertensive Agents - administration & dosage
Blood Flow Velocity - drug effects
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color
Female
Heart Rate - drug effects
Humans
Hypertension - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Image Processing, Computer-Assisted
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Contraction - drug effects
Pilot Projects
Research Design
Stroke Volume - drug effects
Sweden
Tetrazoles - administration & dosage
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Valine - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The advent of colour-coded tissue velocity echocardiography (TVE) has now made it possible to quantify left ventricular (LV) functions in patients with systemic arterial hypertension (HTN). Hypothesis In this project, we have studied the cardiac effects of a single dose of orally administered valsartan in patients with known HTN. METHODS: Fifty-five patients with HTN with a mean age of 56 +/- 10 years were given an early morning dose of 80 mg valsartan withholding regular antihypertensive medications on the day of investigation. TVE images, acquired on VIVID systems were digitized for postprocessing of longitudinal and radial peak systolic velocities, strain rate, and systolic and diastolic time intervals before (pre) and 5 h after (post) administration of the drug. RESULTS: Blood pressure (mmHg) pre and post, respectively, were 147 +/- 15 versus 137 +/- 14 systolic and 90 +/- 7 versus 86 +/- 7 diastolic (all P
PubMed ID
17042901 View in PubMed
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The acute dose-dependent effects of ethanol on canine myocardial perfusion.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11527
Source
Alcohol. 1994 Sep-Oct;11(5):351-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
R V Kettunen
J. Timisjärvi
J. Heikkilä
P. Saukko
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Alcohol. 1994 Sep-Oct;11(5):351-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Blood Flow Velocity
Coronary Circulation - drug effects
Dogs
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethanol - administration & dosage - pharmacology
Hemodynamic Processes - drug effects
Microspheres
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vascular Resistance - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
The acute effects of ethanol (1.0 g/kg and 1.5 g/kg, n = 4 and n = 5, yielding blood concentrations of 1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/ml and 2.4 +/- 0.3 mg/ml) on myocardial perfusion were studied in anesthetized, thoracotomized, artificially ventilated dogs by using a radioactive microsphere technique. The control group (n = 5) received saline. The smaller dose of ethanol decreased perfusion in the left ventricular myocardium from 0.737 +/- 0.122 to 0.555 +/- 0.122 ml/g/min (NS), whereas the greater dose nonsignificantly increased it, from 0.744 +/- 0.115 to 0.819 +/- 0.119 ml/g/min (p
PubMed ID
7818790 View in PubMed
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Acute effects on the ventricular function in Swedish snuffers: an echocardiographic study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127427
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Mar;32(2):106-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2012
Author
D. Sundström
M. Waldenborg
K. Emilsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Physiology, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden. daniel.sundstrom@orebroll.se
Source
Clin Physiol Funct Imaging. 2012 Mar;32(2):106-13
Date
Mar-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Blood pressure
Diastole
Echocardiography, Doppler
Echocardiography, Doppler, Color
Echocardiography, Doppler, Pulsed
Female
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Stroke Volume
Sweden
Systole
Time Factors
Tobacco, Smokeless - adverse effects
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - etiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Ventricular Dysfunction, Right - etiology - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Ventricular Function, Left
Ventricular Function, Right
Young Adult
Abstract
Cigarettes and Swedish snuff contain nicotine, which influence the cardiovascular system. Cigarette smoke has been shown to give an acute impairment in diastolic heart parameters. The systolic and diastolic heart function in snuff users is not thoroughly enough investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate if Swedish snuff will give an acute decrease in systolic and diastolic heart parameters in the left and right ventricles in healthy Swedish snuffers.
Thirty healthy volunteers were examined with echocardiography. The study involved recordings from four different times: before snuff intake, 5 and 30 min after intake and finally 30 min after snuff withdrawal. The systolic and diastolic heart parameters were collected with conventional echocardiographic methods. In addition, the heart frequency and blood pressure response were measured. The pulse and blood pressure response were significantly altered (P
PubMed ID
22296630 View in PubMed
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Adaptive or maladaptive response to adenoviral adrenomedullin gene transfer is context-dependent in the heart.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92802
Source
J Gene Med. 2008 Aug;10(8):867-77
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2008
Author
Leskinen Hanna
Rauma-Pinola Tanja
Szokodi István
Kerkelä Risto
Pikkarainen Sampsa
Uusimaa Paavo
Hautala Timo
Vuolteenaho Olli
Ruskoaho Heikki
Author Affiliation
Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Biocentre Oulu, University of Oulu, Oulu, Finland.
Source
J Gene Med. 2008 Aug;10(8):867-77
Date
Aug-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenoviridae - drug effects
Adrenomedullin - metabolism - pharmacology
Animals
Gene Transfer Techniques
Heart - drug effects - physiology - physiopathology
Heart Ventricles - drug effects
Hypertrophy, Left Ventricular - metabolism - physiopathology
Male
Myocardial Infarction - physiopathology
Myocardium - metabolism
RNA, Messenger - metabolism
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Systole - drug effects
Ventricular Function, Left - drug effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Adrenomedullin (AM) is a potent vasodilator and natriuretic peptide produced in the heart, but controversy persists regarding its cardiac effects. We explored the potential role of AM on cardiac function and remodeling by direct recombinant adenoviral AM gene delivery into the anterior wall of the left ventricle (LV). METHODS: AM was overexpressed in healthy rat hearts and in hearts during the remodeling process in response to pressure overload and myocardial infarction. The AM effects were analysed with echocardiography and in an isolated perfused rat heart preparation. The expression of AM and the activation of underlying signaling pathways were also investigated. RESULTS: AM mRNA increased by 20.9-fold (p
PubMed ID
18615773 View in PubMed
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Adjustments in cardiorespiratory function after pneumonectomy: results of the pneumonectomy project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature138536
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011 Jan;141(1):7-15
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Jean Deslauriers
Paula Ugalde
Santiago Miro
Sylvie Ferland
Sébastien Bergeron
Yves Lacasse
Steve Provencher
Author Affiliation
Department of Thoracic Surgery, Institut Universitaire de Cardiologie et de Pneumologie de Québec, Quebec, Canada. jean.deslauriers@chg.ulaval.ca
Source
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg. 2011 Jan;141(1):7-15
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adaptation, Physiological
Aged
Atrial Function, Right
Blood pressure
Chi-Square Distribution
Dyspnea - etiology - physiopathology
Echocardiography, Doppler
Exercise Test
Exercise Tolerance
Female
Forced expiratory volume
Heart - physiopathology
Humans
Hypertension, Pulmonary - etiology - physiopathology
Kaplan-Meier Estimate
Lung - physiopathology - surgery
Lung Neoplasms - mortality - physiopathology - surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Pneumonectomy - adverse effects - mortality
Pulmonary Artery - physiopathology
Pulmonary Diffusing Capacity
Pulmonary Gas Exchange
Quebec
Recovery of Function
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Ventricular Function, Left
Ventricular Function, Right
Vital Capacity
Abstract
To assess lung function, gas exchange, exercise capacity, and right-sided heart hemodynamics, including pulmonary artery pressure, in patients long term after pneumonectomy.
Among 523 consecutive patients who underwent pneumonectomy for lung cancer between January 1992 and September 2001, 117 were alive in 2006 and 100 were included in the study. During a 1-day period, each patient had complete medical history, chest radiographs, pulmonary function studies, resting arterial blood gas analysis, 6-minute walk test, and Doppler echocardiography.
Most patients (N = 73) had no or only minimal dyspnea. On the basis of predicted values, functional losses in forced expiratory volume in 1 second and forced vital capacity were 38% ± 18% and 31% ± 24%, respectively, and carbon monoxide diffusing capacity decreased by 31% ± 18%. There was a significant correlation between preoperative and postoperative forced expiratory volume in 1 second (P
PubMed ID
21168011 View in PubMed
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Advanced age, low left atrial appendage velocity, and factor V promoter sequence variation as predictors of left atrial thrombosis in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature146014
Source
J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2010 Aug;30(2):192-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2010
Author
Dmitry A Zateyshchikov
Alexey N Brovkin
Dimitry A Chistiakov
Valery V Nosikov
Author Affiliation
Scientific-Educational Medical Center of the Department of General Management of Russian President, Moscow, Russia.
Source
J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2010 Aug;30(2):192-9
Date
Aug-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Atrial Appendage - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Atrial Fibrillation - complications - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Atrial Function, Left
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Echocardiography, Transesophageal
Factor V - genetics
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Polymorphism, Restriction Fragment Length
Promoter Regions, Genetic
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Russia
Stroke Volume
Thrombosis - etiology - genetics - physiopathology
Ventricular Function, Left
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) renders individual patients at risk for development of an atrial thrombus. The aim of this study was to determine clinical and echocardiographic factors influencing the risk of left atrial thrombosis (LAT) in patients with persistent nonvalvular AF. Genetic variants encoding haemostatic factors have been also assessed for putative association with LAT. In the cross-sectional study, a total of 212 patients (132 males and 80 females) with nonvalvular persistent AF (duration range 48 h-90 days) have been selected. LAT was visualized by transesophageal echocardiography. The FGB G(-455)A, PAI-1 4G/5G, F5 C(-224)T, and F5 R506Q genetic markers were tested using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) approach. To reveal independent factors contributing to the thromboembolic risk in AF, a multivariate logistic model was applied. LA thrombi were found in 44 out of 212 subjects (21%). LAT was more frequently observed in patients at age >75 years (P 75 years, LVEF
PubMed ID
20082208 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aerobic interval training compensates age related decline in cardiac function.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature127653
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Jun;46(3):163-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2012
Author
Harald Edvard Molmen
Ulrik Wisloff
Inger Lise Aamot
Asbjorn Stoylen
Charlotte Bjork Ingul
Author Affiliation
Department of Circulation and Medical Imaging, K.G. Jebsen Center of Exercise in Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway. haraldedvard@gmail.com
Source
Scand Cardiovasc J. 2012 Jun;46(3):163-71
Date
Jun-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Analysis of Variance
Blood pressure
Cross-Sectional Studies
Echocardiography, Doppler
Exercise
Exercise Test
Female
Heart Diseases - physiopathology - prevention & control - ultrasonography
Heart rate
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Myocardial Contraction
Norway
Oxygen consumption
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
Sedentary lifestyle
Stroke Volume
Time Factors
Ventricular Function, Left
Ventricular Function, Right
Young Adult
Abstract
To study the effect of aerobic interval training (AIT) on myocardial function in sedentary seniors compared to master athletes (MA) and young controls.
Sixteen seniors (72 ± 1 years, 10 men) performed AIT (4 × 4 minutes) at ˜ 90% of maximal heart rate three times per week for 12 weeks. Results were compared with 11 male MA (74 ± 2 years) and 10 young males (23 ± 2 years).
Seniors had an impaired diastolic function compared to the young at rest. AIT improved resting diastolic parameters, increased E/A ratio (44%, p
PubMed ID
22273242 View in PubMed
Less detail

Age and gender differences in left ventricular function among patients with stable angina and a matched control group. A report from the Angina Prognosis Study in Stockholm.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11210
Source
Cardiology. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):287-93
Publication Type
Article
Author
S V Eriksson
I. Björkander
C. Held
P. Hjemdahl
L. Forslund
N. Rehnqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Danderyd Hospital, Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
Source
Cardiology. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):287-93
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Age Factors
Aged
Angina Pectoris - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Blood Pressure - physiology
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Comparative Study
Double-Blind Method
Echocardiography, Doppler
Electrocardiography
Female
Heart Rate - physiology
Humans
Male
Metoprolol - therapeutic use
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sex Factors
Sweden
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - drug therapy - physiopathology - ultrasonography
Ventricular Function, Left - physiology
Verapamil - therapeutic use
Abstract
To assess left ventricular systolic and diastolic function, M-mode (n = 675) and transmitral Doppler echocardiography (n = 358) were performed in patients with stable angina pectoris and compared with 50 matched healthy controls. Left ventricular fractional shortening (FS) was significantly lower in male than in female patients (32 +/- 7 vs. 35 +/- 7%, p
PubMed ID
8793161 View in PubMed
Less detail

274 records – page 1 of 28.