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14 records – page 1 of 2.

Appropriate use of the implantable cardioverter defibrillator: a Canadian perspective. Canadian Working Group on Cardiac Pacing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature203131
Source
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol. 1999 Jan;22(1 Pt 1):1-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1999

Chapter 1. Summary of the CCS Consensus Conference on prevention of sudden death from cardiac arrhythmia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature196746
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Oct;16(10):1298-302
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Date
Oct-2000
Author
S J Connolly
M. Talajic
Author Affiliation
Hamilton Health Sciences Corporation, Hamilton, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2000 Oct;16(10):1298-302
Date
Oct-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Conference/Meeting Material
Article
Keywords
Canada
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - prevention & control
Defibrillators, Implantable
Humans
Quality of Life
Risk
Survival Rate
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality - therapy
PubMed ID
11064304 View in PubMed
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Defibrillation before EMS arrival in western Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286533
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2017 Aug;35(8):1043-1048
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2017
Author
A. Claesson
J. Herlitz
L. Svensson
L. Ottosson
L. Bergfeldt
J. Engdahl
C. Ericson
P. Sandén
C. Axelsson
A. Bremer
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 2017 Aug;35(8):1043-1048
Date
Aug-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods
Defibrillators - utilization
Emergency medical services
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Out-of-Hospital Cardiac Arrest - mortality - therapy
Survival Rate - trends
Sweden - epidemiology
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality - therapy
Abstract
Bystanders play a vital role in public access defibrillation (PAD) in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). Dual dispatch of first responders (FR) alongside emergency medical services (EMS) can reduce time to first defibrillation. The aim of this study was to describe the use of automated external defibrillators (AEDs) in OHCAs before EMS arrival.
All OHCA cases with a shockable rhythm in which an AED was used prior to the arrival of EMS between 2008 and 2015 in western Sweden were eligible for inclusion. Data from the Swedish Register for Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (SRCR) were used for analysis, on-site bystander and FR defibrillation were compared with EMS defibrillation in the final analysis.
Of the reported 6675 cases, 24% suffered ventricular fibrillation (VF), 162 patients (15%) of all VF cases were defibrillated before EMS arrival, 46% with a public AED on site. The proportion of cases defibrillated before EMS arrival increased from 5% in 2008 to 20% in 2015 (p
PubMed ID
28238537 View in PubMed
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The impact of therapeutic hypothermia on neurological function and quality of life after cardiac arrest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90617
Source
Resuscitation. 2009 Feb;80(2):171-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Bro-Jeppesen John
Kjaergaard Jesper
Horsted Tina I
Wanscher Michael C
Nielsen Søren Louman
Rasmussen Lars S
Hassager Christian
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, The Heart Centre, Copenhagen University Hospital Rigshospitalet, DK-2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Resuscitation. 2009 Feb;80(2):171-6
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Coma
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Humans
Hypothermia, Induced
Intensive Care Units
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Neurologic Examination
Neuropsychological Tests
Prospective Studies
Quality of Life
Tachycardia, Ventricular - mortality - therapy
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality - therapy
Abstract
AIMS: To assess the impact of therapeutic hypothermia on cognitive function and quality of life in comatose survivors of out of Hospital Cardiac arrest (OHCA). METHODS: We prospectively studied comatose survivors of OHCA consecutively admitted in a 4-year period. Therapeutic hypothermia was implemented in the last 2-year period, intervention period (n=79), and this group was compared to patients admitted the 2 previous years, control period (n=77). We assessed Cerebral Performance Category (CPC), survival, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and self-rated quality of life (SF-36) 6 months after OHCA in the subgroup with VF/VT as initial rhythm. RESULTS: CPC in patients alive at hospital discharge was significantly better in the intervention period with a CPC of 1-2 in 97% vs. 71% in the control period, p=0.003, corresponding to an adjusted odds ratio of a favourable cerebral outcome of 17, p=0.01. No significant differences were found in long-term survival (57% vs. 56% alive at 30 months), MMSE, or SF-36. Therapeutic hypothermia (hazard ratio: 0.15, p=0.007) and bystander CPR (hazard ratio 0.19, p=0.002) were significantly related to survival in the intervention period. CONCLUSION: CPC at discharge from hospital was significantly improved following implementation of therapeutic hypothermia in comatose patients resuscitated from OCHA with VF/VT. However, significant improvement in survival, cognitive status or quality of life could not be detected at long-term follow-up.
PubMed ID
19111378 View in PubMed
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[Improved survival after in-hospital cardiac arrest]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54031
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Jul 26;97(30-31):3363-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-26-2000
Author
J. Herlitz
A. Bång
L. Ekström
A. Agård
M. Holmberg
G. Lundström
S. Holmberg
Author Affiliation
Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset, Göteborg.
Source
Lakartidningen. 2000 Jul 26;97(30-31):3363-8
Date
Jul-26-2000
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
Coronary Care Units - standards
English Abstract
Follow-Up Studies
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Hospital Mortality
Humans
Monitoring, Physiologic
Prognosis
Survival Rate
Sweden - epidemiology
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality - therapy
Abstract
Internationally, survival among patients suffering in-hospital cardiac arrest is relatively low and unchanged at about 15%. Our experience at Sahlgrenska Hospital in Göteborg indicates a higher rate. We found survival to be related to the type of arrhythmia initially encountered, the highest rate having been observed among patients in ventricular fibrillation. We also found survival among patients suffering cardiac arrest to be higher in monitored as opposed to non-monitored wards. Whether the improved survival rate observed at Sahlgrenska as compared with international observations among patients suffering cardiac arrest is due to improvements in the organization or to patient selection is not clear. In order to achieve a higher survival rate after in-hospital cardiac arrest an efficient organization in which health care providers are given regular training and feed back is most likely of the utmost importance.
PubMed ID
11016197 View in PubMed
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Prehospital resuscitation in Helsinki, Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228750
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 1990 Jul;8(4):359-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-1990
Author
T. Silfvast
Author Affiliation
Prehospital Emergency Care Unit, Helsinki University, Finland.
Source
Am J Emerg Med. 1990 Jul;8(4):359-64
Date
Jul-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Emergency Medical Services - organization & administration
Female
Finland
Heart Arrest - etiology - therapy
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Resuscitation
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality - therapy
Abstract
Helsinki, a city of 500,000 inhabitants, is served by a two-tiered emergency medical system with basic emergency medical technicians in ordinary ambulances and one physician-staffed prehospital emergency care unit. All 266 patients with prehospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation during 1987 were studied. Two hundred twelve patients with presumed heart disease and a witnessed arrest were analyzed further. Their response times for basic life support and advanced life support were 5.5 and 10.7 minutes, respectively. The initial cardiac rhythm in 144 patients (68%) was ventricular fibrillation. In 79 of these patients, cardiopulmonary resuscitation was successful, and 39 patients (27%) were discharged from hospital. The patients who survived had shorter response times for basic life support and their arrest locations was more often outside home, compared with the nonsurvivors. The results seem comparable with emergency medical systems in the United States, but a need to reduce response times is identified.
PubMed ID
2363761 View in PubMed
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The problem of out-of-hospital cardiac-arrest prevalence of sudden death in Europe today.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54270
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1999 Mar 11;83(5B):88D-90D
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-11-1999
Author
M. Holmberg
S. Holmberg
J. Herlitz
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1999 Mar 11;83(5B):88D-90D
Date
Mar-11-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care - statistics & numerical data
Cross-Sectional Studies
Death, Sudden, Cardiac - epidemiology - prevention & control
Electric Countershock
Emergency Medical Services - statistics & numerical data
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Heart Arrest - mortality - prevention & control
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality - therapy
Abstract
In Europe, 40% of all deaths of individuals who are 25-74 years of age are caused by cardiovascular disease. Cardiac disease is the underlying cause in two-thirds of out-of-hospital sudden deaths. The 28-day case fatality rate for the combined population of out-of-hospital coronary artery disease deaths and hospitalized acute myocardial infarction patients is approximately 50% in 29 of the regions included in the World Health Organization (WHO) Monitoring Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Disease registry. Of 14,065 patients included in the Swedish Cardiac Arrest Registry, resuscitation procedures were started in 10,966 patients. The remaining 3,099 were considered definitely dead; 70% were witnessed, cardiac arrests and 32.3% had been given bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). The incidence of ventricular tachycardia (VT)/ventricular fibrillation (VF) in all patients was 43%, in witnessed cases 54%, and in nonwitnessed cases, 31%. The initial incidence of VT/VF was calculated to be approximately 60% in the whole population and 80-85% in those with probable cardiac disease. Survival to 1 month was 5.0% in the total population, 9.5% for those with VT/VF on the first electrocardiogram compared with 1.6% for those not in VT/VF. Survival rate was also calculated in relation to delay time to first defibrillation. Survival was 50% when defibrillation was performed immediately and decreased gradually to 0% for those with a delay time of 20 minutes. The survival rate after bystander CPR was 2.6-fold higher than the rate for those where no treatment was given until the ambulance arrived.
PubMed ID
10089847 View in PubMed
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Reducing no flow times during automated external defibrillation.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53094
Source
Resuscitation. 2005 Oct;67(1):95-101
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2005
Author
Joar Eilevstjønn
Jo Kramer-Johansen
Trygve Eftestøl
Mette Stavland
Helge Myklebust
Petter Andreas Steen
Author Affiliation
Laerdal Medical AS, P.O. Box 377, N-4002 Stavanger, Norway. joar.eilevstjonn@laerdal.no
Source
Resuscitation. 2005 Oct;67(1):95-101
Date
Oct-2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automation
Cardiac Output - physiology
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation - methods
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Defibrillators
Electric Countershock - instrumentation - methods
Electrocardiography
Emergency Medical Services - methods
Female
Heart Arrest - diagnosis - mortality - therapy
Hemodynamic Processes - physiology
Humans
Male
Norway
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Survival Analysis
Time Factors
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality - therapy
Abstract
There has recently been an increased attention focused on the importance of reducing time without blood flow from chest compressions (no flow time, NFT) during cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). In this study we have analyzed and quantified the NFTs during external automatic defibrillation in 105 cardiac arrest patients. We found that for around half of the time (about 10 min), these patients were not perfused. We have proposed methods to reduce NFT in connection with analyses and shocks. The key factors were rhythm analysis during ongoing CPR, capacitor charging during analysis, 1 min of CPR immediately after a shock (with rhythm analysis during CPR at the end of the 1 min), and distinguishing between asystole and organized rhythm in analyses to skip pulse check if asystole. The potential reduction in NFT using these methods was calculated theoretically and we found a reduction in the total NFT of about 4.5 and 1 min, respectively, in the subgroups of patients having at least one shock and patients having received no shocks. In the present study, the median NFT ratio could theoretically be reduced from 51% to 34% or 49% to 39% depending on if the patient would have a shockable rhythm or not. By introducing the proposed methods into an AED, the NFT would be significantly reduced, hopefully increasing the survival.
PubMed ID
16154679 View in PubMed
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Resuscitation of cardiac arrest outside hospitals: experiences with a mobile intensive care unit in Oslo.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43493
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand Suppl. 1973;53:13-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

Sudden cardiac arrest outside the hospital--value of defibrillators in ambulances.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55265
Source
Resuscitation. 1991 Apr;21(2-3):283-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1991
Author
C. Torp-Pedersen
E. Birk Madsen
A. Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Glostrup County Hospital, Denmark.
Source
Resuscitation. 1991 Apr;21(2-3):283-8
Date
Apr-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Ambulances
Denmark - epidemiology
Electric Countershock - instrumentation - utilization
Heart Arrest - mortality - therapy
Humans
Resuscitation
Time Factors
Ventricular Fibrillation - mortality - therapy
Abstract
In a region with a population of 250,000 people, all emergency calls for cardiac arrest were prospectively registered during a period of 6 years. Timing of events were carefully registered as were treatment and the participation of 3 ambulances equipped with defibrillators. When time until initial treatment of cardiac arrest was below 5 min, 12% could be resuscitated and discharged alive. This figure decreased to 2% in the period between 5 and 10 min and was zero to above 10 min. Similarly, a reasonable 12% of patients experiencing ventricular fibrillation at a public place could be resuscitated and discharged alive whereas only 5% of ventricular fibrillation occurring at the patients home could be successfully resuscitated. Asystolia was rarely treated successfully. Faster treatment improved results much and 63% of patients having ventricular fibrillation in the emergency room left hospital alive. Results of cardioversion in ambulances did not depend on time from initiation of cardiac arrest, but all patients receiving cardioversion later than 10 min died without regaining consciousness. The results were compared with other more effective programs. The study region apparently had much fewer cardiac arrest than a similar region in Seattle, U.S.A. In those cases where treatment could be initiated within 5 min, results were comparable.
PubMed ID
1650029 View in PubMed
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14 records – page 1 of 2.