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Alcohol consumption, types of alcoholic beverages and risk of venous thromboembolism - the Tromsø Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134175
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Ida J Hansen-Krone
Sigrid K Brækkan
Kristin F Enga
Tom Wilsgaard
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Hematological research group in Tromsø (HERG), Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. ida.j.hansen-krone@uit.no
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2011 Aug;106(2):272-8
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Beer
Ethanol - poisoning
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Norway
Pregnancy
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - etiology - prevention & control
Wine
Abstract
Moderate alcohol consumption has been shown to protect against cardiovascular diseases. The association between alcohol consumption, especially types of alcoholic beverages, and venous thromboembolism (VTE) is less well described. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of alcohol consumption and different alcoholic beverages on risk of VTE. Information on alcohol consumption was collected by a self-administrated questionnaire in 26,662 subjects, aged 25-97 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study, in 1994-1995. Subjects were followed through September 1, 2007 with incident VTE as the primary outcome. There were 460 incident VTE-events during a median of 12.5 years of follow-up. Total alcohol consumption was not associated with risk of incident VTE. However, subjects consuming = 3 units of liquor per week had 53% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotalers in analyses adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, smoking, diabetes, cancer, previous cardiovascular disease, physical activity and higher education (HR: 1.53, 95% CI: 1.00-2.33). Contrary, subjects with a wine intake of = 3 units/week had 22% reduced risk of VTE (HR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.47-1.30), further adjustment for liquor and beer intake strengthened the protective effect of wine (HR: 0.53, 95% CI: 0.30-1.00). Frequent binge drinkers (= 1/week) had a 17% increased risk of VTE compared to teetotallers (HR 1.17, 95% CI: 0.66-2.09), and a 47% increased risk compared to non-binge drinkers (HR 1.47, 95% CI: 0.85-2.54). In conclusion, liquor consumption and binge drinking was associated with increased risk of VTE, whereas wine consumption was possibly associated with reduced risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
21614415 View in PubMed
Less detail

Cost-effectiveness of rivaroxaban versus enoxaparin for the prevention of postsurgical venous thromboembolism in Canada.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature141138
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2010 Oct;104(4):760-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2010
Author
Alexander Diamantopoulos
Michael Lees
Philip S Wells
Fiona Forster
Jaithri Ananthapavan
Heather McDonald
Author Affiliation
Symmetron Limited, London, UK.
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2010 Oct;104(4):760-70
Date
Oct-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Canada
Cost-Benefit Analysis - methods
Enoxaparin - economics - therapeutic use
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Morpholines - economics - therapeutic use
Postoperative Complications
Quality of Life
Sensitivity and specificity
Thiophenes - economics - therapeutic use
Venous Thromboembolism - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of prophylaxis with rivaroxaban vs. enoxaparin in the prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total hip replacement (THR) and total knee replacement (TKR) from the perspective of the Canadian healthcare system. A model was developed that included both acute VTE (represented as a decision tree) and long-term complications (represented as a Markov process with one-year cycles). Transition probabilities were derived from phase III clinical trials comparing rivaroxaban with enoxaparin and published literature. Costs were derived from the Ontario Case Costing Initiative and publicly available sources. Utilities were derived from published literature. The model reported VTE event rates, quality-adjusted life expectancy and direct medical costs over a five-year horizon. Costs are reported in 2007 Canadian Dollars (C$). When rivaroxaban and enoxaparin are compared in patients undergoing THR, rivaroxaban dominates enoxaparin. That is, rivaroxaban is associated with improved health outcomes as measured by increased quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; 0.0006) and fewer symptomatic VTE events (0.0061), and also with lower cost (savings of C$300) per patient. Similarly, rivaroxaban dominates enoxaparin in patients undergoing TKR, achieving a gain of 0.0018 QALYs, a reduction of 0.0192 symptomatic venous thromboembolic events and savings of C$129 per patient. Rivaroxaban is a cost-effective alternative to enoxaparin for VTE prophylaxis in patients undergoing THR and TKR. Over a five-year horizon, rivaroxaban dominated enoxaparin in the prevention of VTE events in patients undergoing THR and TKR, providing more quality-of-life benefit at a lower cost.
PubMed ID
20806107 View in PubMed
Less detail

Surgical venous thromboprophylaxis: a cross-sectional survey of canadian gynaecologic oncologists.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature256632
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2012 Jul;34(7):673-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2012
Author
Laura Hopkins
Marc Carrier
Marie Plante
Vilma Luna
Walter Gotlieb
Lisa Rambout
Author Affiliation
Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2012 Jul;34(7):673-7
Date
Jul-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Anticoagulants - administration & dosage
Canada
Cross-Sectional Studies
Data Collection
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - surgery
Gynecologic Surgical Procedures - adverse effects
Health Care Surveys
Humans
Middle Aged
Physicians
Postoperative Complications - prevention & control
Preoperative Care
Questionnaires
Venous Thromboembolism - etiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality following gynaecologic cancer surgery. The objective of this study was to assess the current practice for VTE prophylaxis among Canadian gynaecologic oncologists for both open and minimally invasive surgical techniques and to assess interest in participation in a clinical trial to examine this issue.
Assessment of national thromboprophylaxis practices was achieved through an online survey technique, "Zoomerang." An invitation to complete the survey was sent out via email to members of the Society of Gynecologic Oncology of Canada.
The majority of respondents (78%) believed surgical thromboprophylaxis to be indicated for all gynaecologic oncology patients, irrespective of an open versus minimally invasive approach. Current thromboprophylaxis practice patterns are variable, reflecting centre-specific challenges.
Venous thromboembolism is an important and preventable complication of major gynaecologic surgery. A demonstrated lack of evidence and consensus regarding VTE prophylaxis following minimally invasive procedures for gynaecologic oncology patients necessitates further prospective study to evaluate the incidence, risk, treatment, and cost-effectiveness of prophylaxis.
PubMed ID
22742487 View in PubMed
Less detail

[The impact of thromboprophylaxis with enoxaparin on bleeding rate in rejuvenating facelift procedures].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature258756
Source
Khirurgiia (Mosk). 2014;(7):66-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014