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30-year mortality after venous thromboembolism: a population-based cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257922
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2-2014
Author
Kirstine Kobberøe Søgaard
Morten Schmidt
Lars Pedersen
Erzsébet Horváth-Puhó
Henrik Toft Sørensen
Author Affiliation
From the Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. kks@clin.au.dk.
Source
Circulation. 2014 Sep 2;130(10):829-36
Date
Sep-2-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cohort Studies
Databases as Topic - statistics & numerical data
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Regression Analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - mortality
Abstract
Studies on long-term mortality after venous thromboembolism (VTE) are sparse.
Using Danish medical databases, we conducted a 30-year nationwide population-based cohort study of 128 223 patients with first-time VTE (1980-2011) and a comparison cohort of 640 760 people from the general population (without VTE) randomly matched by sex, year of birth, and calendar period. The mortality risks for patients with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) were markedly higher than for the comparison cohort during the first year, especially within the first 30 days (3.0% and 31% versus 0.4%). Using Cox regression, we assessed mortality rate ratios (MRRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The overall 30-year MRR was 1.55 (95% CI, 1.53-1.57) for DVT and 2.77 (95% CI, 2.74-2.81) for PE. The 30-day MRR was 5.38 (95% CI, 5.00-5.80) for DVT and 80.87 (95% CI, 76.02-86.02) for PE. Over time, the 30-day MRR was consistently 5- to 6-fold increased for DVT, whereas it improved for PE from 138 (95% CI, 125-153) in 1980 to 1989 to 36.08 (95% CI, 32.65-39.87) in 2000 to 2011. The 1- to 10-year and 11- to 30-year MRRs remained 25% to 40% increased after both DVT and PE but were 3- to 5-fold increased after DVT and 6- to 11-fold increased after PE when VTE was considered the immediate cause of death.
Patients with VTE are at increased risk of dying, especially within the first year after diagnosis, but also during the entire 30 years of follow-up, with VTE as an important cause of death. Although 30-day mortality after DVT remained fairly constant over the last 3 decades, it improved markedly for PE.
Notes
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49625027484
Comment In: Nat Rev Cardiol. 2014 Sep;11(9):49725027486
PubMed ID
24970783 View in PubMed
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Acquired risk factors for venous thromboembolism in medical patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95327
Source
Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2005;:458-61
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005
Author
Prandoni Paolo
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, Via Ospedale Civile, 105, Padua 35128, Italy. paoloprandoni@tin.it
Source
Hematology Am Soc Hematol Educ Program. 2005;:458-61
Date
2005
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Dehydration - complications
Female
Fractures, Bone - complications
Humans
Paralysis - complications
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Puerperal Disorders - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Travel
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - prevention & control
Abstract
Acute venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a serious and potentially fatal disorder, which often complicates the course of hospitalized patients, but may also affect ambulatory and otherwise healthy people. While the introduction of thromboprophylactic measures is expected to have reduced the occurrence of postoperative VTE, there is an increasing awareness of the importance of medical conditions in determining thromboembolic events. Among the conditions that predispose patients to VTE are increasing age, cancer and its treatment, prolonged immobility, stroke or paralysis, previous VTE, congestive heart failure, acute infection, pregnancy or puerperium, dehydration, hormonal treatment, varicose veins, long air travel, acute inflammatory bowel disease, rheumatologic disease, and nephrotic syndrome. Other factors that have recently been associated with an increased risk of VTE disorders include persistent elevation of D-dimer and atherosclerotic disease. Recognition of the incidence and clinical importance of thrombosis will most likely encourage more widespread use of antithrombotic prophylaxis in medical patients.
PubMed ID
16304420 View in PubMed
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Age-and sex-specific seasonal variation of venous thromboembolism in patients with and without family history: a nationwide family study in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107143
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2013 Dec;110(6):1164-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Bengt Zöller
Xinjun Li
Henrik Ohlsson
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
Dr. Bengt Zöller, Center for Primary Health Care Research, CRC, Building 28, Floor 11, Jan Waldenströms gata 35, Skåne University Hospital, S-205 02 Malmö, Sweden, Tel.: +46 70 6691476, Fax: +46 40 391370, E-mail: bengt.zoller@med.lu.se 
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2013 Dec;110(6):1164-71
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Progression
Family
Female
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Male
Middle Aged
Pedigree
Risk
Seasons
Sex Factors
Sweden
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - genetics
Young Adult
Abstract
Seasonal variation in venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk in individuals with familial predisposition to VTE has not been explored. This nationwide study aimed to determine whether there are age- and sex-specific seasonal differences in risk of hospitalisation of VTE among individuals with and without a family history of VTE. The Swedish Multi-Generation Register was linked to Hospital Discharge Register data for the period 1964-2010. Seasonal variation in first VTE events in 1987-2010 for individuals with and without a family history of VTE (siblings or parents) was determined by several independent methods. Stratified analyses were performed according to age, sex, and VTE subtype (pulmonary embolism [PE] or deep venous thrombosis [DVT]). Seasonal variation in VTE incidence, mostly with a peak during the winter, was observed in both sexes in individuals with and without family history with overall peak-to-low ratios (PLRs) of 1.15 and 1.21, respectively. The peak day was December 25 and February 1 for those with and without a family history of VTE, respectively. Seasonal variation was strongest among individuals aged >50 years. Among individuals aged 0-25 years with a family history, the peak for VTE was in July (PLR = 1.20). Significant seasonal variation was observed for PE and DVT with the exception of DVT among those with a family history (PLR = 1.01). In conclusion, our data support the presence of a modest seasonal variation of VTE among individuals with and without a family history of VTE. However, young age and family history may modify and attenuate the effect of season on VTE.
PubMed ID
24048360 View in PubMed
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Alcohol intake and risk of venous thromboembolism. A Danish follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature114655
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2013 Jul;110(1):39-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Freja Stoltze Gaborit
Kim Overvad
Mette Nørgaard
Søren Risom Kristensen
Anne Tjønneland
Marianne Tang Severinsen
Author Affiliation
Department of Haematology, Aalborg Hospital, 9000 Aalborg, Denmark.
Source
Thromb Haemost. 2013 Jul;110(1):39-45
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol drinking - epidemiology
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Questionnaires
Risk
Sex Factors
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Abstract
Knowledge about the influence of alcohol intake on the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is limited. We investigated the risk of VTE according to alcohol intake and drinking pattern among 27,178 men and 29,876 women participating in the Danish follow-up study Diet, Cancer and Health. Information on alcohol exposure and potential confounders were obtained from baseline questionnaires. We used Cox proportional hazard models to assess the association between VTE and alcohol intake. We performed separate analyses for the two sexes. During follow-up 619 incidents VTE events were verified. The lowest incidence rates of VTE were found for an average weekly intake of 3.9-13.9 standard drinks per weeks both for men and women. The adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.91 [95%CI: 0.69-1.19] for women and 0.75 [95%CI: 0.56-1.02] for men according to an average alcohol intake of 3.9-13.9 standard drinks per week compared with low alcohol intake. In men, alcohol intake 2-6 times per week was associated with a lower risk of VTE compared to once per week (HR 0.77 [95%CI: 0.59-0.99]), but the difference disappeared after adjustment for total alcohol intake. We found no difference in the risk of VTE according to wine and beer intake. In conclusion, we found no consistent or statistically significant association between VTE and alcohol intake. Our data showed a u-formed association between alcohol intake and VTE, indicating that moderate alcohol intake may lower the risk of VTE with 10-30% in men.
PubMed ID
23595624 View in PubMed
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Alcohol use disorders are associated with venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature271195
Source
J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2015 Aug;40(2):167-73
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2015
Author
Bengt Zöller
Jianguang Ji
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Source
J Thromb Thrombolysis. 2015 Aug;40(2):167-73
Date
Aug-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholism - complications - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Moderate alcohol consumption has been suggested to protect against venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, it is not known how alcohol abuse and its associated somatic complications affect the risk of VTE. The present study determined the risk of pulmonary embolism (PE) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities in patients with alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in Sweden. All inpatients with AUDs in 2002-2010 without a previous VTE event (72,024 patients) were matched to five controls without AUD and followed until the end of follow-up (December 31, 2010), death, emigration or a VTE event. Cox regression was used to determine adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for VTE. AUD patients were further divided into those without alcohol-related somatic complications (AUD-) and those with alcohol-related somatic complications (AUD+, i.e., encephalopathy, epilepsy, polyneuropathy, myopathy, cardiomyopathy, gastritis, liver disease, acute pancreatitis, and chronic pancreatitis). The adjusted HR for VTE was significantly increased for both AUD- (HR 1.70, 95 % CI 1.55-1.87) and AUD+ (HR 1.73, 95 % CI 1.37-2.19) patients. The risk of DVT was increased in both AUD+ and AUD- patients (HR 1.62, 95 % CI 1.45-1.83 and HR 1.99, 95 % CI 1.53-2.59, respectively). However, the risk of PE was only significantly increased in AUD- patients (HR 1.87, 95 % 1.59-1.20) and not in AUD+ patients (HR 1.16, 95 % 0.70-1.91). In conclusion, the present study shows that AUD increases the risk of VTE, even in the absence of alcohol-related somatic complications. Our findings suggest that severe alcohol abuse increases the risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
25605687 View in PubMed
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Anthropometric measures of obesity and risk of venous thromboembolism: the Tromso study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147924
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Jan;30(1):121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2010
Author
Knut H Borch
Sigrid K Braekkan
Ellisiv B Mathiesen
Inger Njølstad
Tom Wilsgaard
Jan Størmer
John-Bjarne Hansen
Author Affiliation
Center for Atherothrombotic Research in Tromsø, Department of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. knut.borch@fagmed.uit.no
Source
Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010 Jan;30(1):121-7
Date
Jan-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Obesity - epidemiology - pathology
Predictive value of tests
Prospective Studies
ROC Curve
Registries
Risk factors
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of various obesity measures on identification of subjects at risk and their respective risk estimates for VTE in a prospective population-based study.
Measures of body composition such as body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), hip circumference (HC), and waist-hip ratio (WHR) were registered in 6708 subjects aged 25 to 84 years, who participated in the Tromsø Study (1994-1995). Incident VTE-events were registered during follow-up until September 1, 2007. There were 222 VTE-events during a median of 12.3 years of follow-up. All measures of obesity exhibited significantly increased HR for VTE in multivariable models with highest risk estimates for WC in both genders. The risk of VTE increased across quartiles of BMI, WC, and HC in both genders, but not for WHR. WC identified more subjects at risk using established criteria for obesity. WC had the highest area under the curve in both genders in ROC analysis, and WC above ROC-derived cut-off values (WC > or =85 cm in women and > or =95 cm in men) were associated with HRs of 1.92 (95% CI: 1.05 to 3.48) in women and 2.78 (95% CI: 1.47 to 5.27) in men.
Our findings indicate that WC is the preferable anthropometric measure of obesity to identify subjects at risk and to predict risk of VTE.
PubMed ID
19834110 View in PubMed
Less detail

Anthropometry, body fat, and venous thromboembolism: a Danish follow-up study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature147736
Source
Circulation. 2009 Nov 10;120(19):1850-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-10-2009
Author
Marianne Tang Severinsen
Søren Risom Kristensen
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Claus Dethlefsen
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Aalborg Hospital, Sdr. Skovvej 15, DK-9000 Aalborg, Denmark. m.severinsen@rn.dk
Source
Circulation. 2009 Nov 10;120(19):1850-7
Date
Nov-10-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adipose Tissue - pathology
Anthropometry
Body mass index
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Registries
Risk factors
Sex Distribution
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control
Waist Circumference
Waist-Hip Ratio
Abstract
Obesity, measured as body mass index, is associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE). Body mass index is a marker of excess weight and correlates well with body fat content in adults; however, it fails to consider the distribution of body fat. We assessed the association between anthropometric variables and VTE.
From 1993 to 1997, 27 178 men and 29 876 women 50 to 64 years of age were recruited into a Danish prospective study (Diet, Cancer, and Health). During 10 years of follow-up, the outcome of VTE events was identified in the Danish National Patient Registry and verified by review of medical records. Body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and total body fat were measured at baseline. We used Cox proportional hazard models to assess the association between anthropometry and VTE. Age was used as a time axis, with further adjustment for smoking, physical activity, height, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, cholesterol, and, among women, use of hormone replacement therapy. We verified 641 incident VTE events and found monotonic dose-response relationships between VTE and all anthropometric measurements in both sexes. In mutually adjusted analyses of waist and hip circumference, we found that hip circumference was positively associated with VTE in women but not in men, whereas waist circumference was positively associated with VTE in men but not in women.
All measurements of obesity are predictors of the risk for VTE. Positive associations were found between VTE and body weight, body mass index, waist circumference, hip circumference, and total body fat mass.
PubMed ID
19858417 View in PubMed
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The Association between Residence Floor Level and Cardiovascular Disease: The Health and Environment in Oslo Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature286125
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2016;2016:2951658
Publication Type
Article
Date
2016
Author
Mads K Rohde
Geir Aamodt
Source
J Environ Public Health. 2016;2016:2951658
Date
2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Housing
Humans
Intermittent Claudication - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Norway - epidemiology
Prevalence
Risk factors
Self Report
Socioeconomic Factors
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
Background. Increasingly more people live in tall buildings and on higher floor levels. Factors relating to floor level may protect against or cause cardiovascular disease (CVD). Only one previous study has investigated the association between floor level and CVD. Methods. We studied associations between floor of bedroom and self-reported history of stroke, venous thromboembolism (VTE), and intermittent claudication (IC) among 12.525 inhabitants in Oslo, Norway. We fitted multivariate logistic regression models and adjusted for sociodemographic variables, socioeconomic status (SES), and health behaviors. Additionally, we investigated block apartment residents (N = 5.374) separately. Results. Trend analyses showed that disease prevalence increased by floor level, for all three outcomes. When we investigated block apartment residents alone, the trends disappeared, but one association remained: higher odds of VTE history on 6th floor or higher, compared to basement and 1st floor (OR: 1.504; 95% CI: 1.007-2.247). Conclusion. Floor level is positively associated with CVD, in Oslo. The best-supported explanation may be residual confounding by building height and SES. Another explanation, about the impact of atmospheric electricity, is also presented. The results underline a need to better understand the associations between residence floor level and CVD and multistory housing and CVD.
Notes
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PubMed ID
28053608 View in PubMed
Less detail

Association of irritable bowel syndrome and venous thromboembolism.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295865
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2018 Jun - Jul; 53(7):784-789
Publication Type
Journal Article
Author
Bengt Zöller
Henrik Ohlsson
Rasmus Waehrens
Jan Sundquist
Kristina Sundquist
Author Affiliation
a Center for Primary Health Care Research, Lund University, Region Skåne , Malmö , Sweden.
Source
Scand J Gastroenterol. 2018 Jun - Jul; 53(7):784-789
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Irritable Bowel Syndrome - epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Outpatients
Primary Health Care
Registries
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with venous thromboembolism (VTE). Whether functional gastrointestinal disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), are associated with VTE has not been determined. This nationwide study aimed to determine the risk of VTE in IBS outpatients in primary and specialist care.
We performed two matched case-control studies. Cases (n?=?90,502) were individuals in Sweden aged 18-80 years with a first hospital diagnosis of VTE between 2001 and 2010. Five controls (n?=?452,510) from the Swedish Total Population Register were matched to each case for birth, sex, country of birth, and education level. Diagnosis of IBS was determined in the Swedish hospital outpatient register. This procedure was replicated for the primary care population. As the Primary Care data did not have nationwide coverage, we only included individuals that were registered in the Primary Care database. A total of 9766 cases of hospital diagnosed VTE individuals could be found in the Primary Care population and they were matched to 48,830 controls also from the Primary health care population. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine odds ratio (OR) for first VTE diagnosis. Results The adjusted OR for VTE when IBS was diagnosed in hospital outpatient care was 1.49 (95% confidence interval 1.33-1.67). The crude OR for VTE was 1.18 (0.94-1.48) when IBS was diagnosed in primary care.
This is the first study describing an association between VTE and IBS. The results suggest that specialist treated IBS patients have increased risk of VTE.
Notes
CommentIn: Scand J Gastroenterol. 2018 Jun - Jul;53(7):895 PMID 29779407
PubMed ID
29688100 View in PubMed
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Association of mild to moderate chronic kidney disease with venous thromboembolism: pooled analysis of five prospective general population cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature120717
Source
Circulation. 2012 Oct 16;126(16):1964-71
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-16-2012
Author
Bakhtawar K Mahmoodi
Ron T Gansevoort
Inger Anne Næss
Pamela L Lutsey
Sigrid K Brækkan
Nic J G M Veeger
Ellen E Brodin
Karina Meijer
Yingying Sang
Kunihiro Matsushita
Stein I Hallan
Jens Hammerstrøm
Suzanne C Cannegieter
Brad C Astor
Josef Coresh
Aaron R Folsom
John-Bjarne Hansen
Mary Cushman
Author Affiliation
Department of Nephrology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Groningen, The Netherlands.
Source
Circulation. 2012 Oct 16;126(16):1964-71
Date
Oct-16-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cohort Studies
Europe - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Renal Insufficiency, Chronic - epidemiology
Risk factors
Severity of Illness Index
Venous Thromboembolism - epidemiology
Abstract
Recent findings suggest that chronic kidney disease (CKD) may be associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Given the high prevalence of mild-to-moderate CKD in the general population, in depth analysis of this association is warranted.
We pooled individual participant data from 5 community-based cohorts from Europe (second Nord-Trøndelag Health Study [HUNT2], Prevention of Renal and Vascular End-stage Disease [PREVEND], and the Tromsø study) and the United States (Atherosclerosis Risks in Communities [ARIC] and Cardiovascular Health Study [CHS]) to assess the association of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), albuminuria, and CKD with objectively verified VTE. To estimate adjusted hazard ratios for VTE, categorical and continuous spline models were fit by using Cox regression with shared-frailty or random-effect meta-analysis. A total of 1178 VTE events occurred over 599 453 person-years follow-up. Relative to eGFR 100 mL/min per 1.73 m(2), hazard ratios for VTE were 1.29 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.59) for eGFR 75, 1.31 (1.00-1.71) for eGFR 60, 1.82 (1.27-2.60) for eGFR 45, and 1.95 (1.26-3.01) for eGFR 30 mL/min per 1.73 m(2). In comparison with an albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) of 5.0 mg/g, the hazard ratios for VTE were 1.34 (1.04-1.72) for ACR 30 mg/g, 1.60 (1.08-2.36) for ACR 300 mg/g, and 1.92 (1.19-3.09) for ACR 1000 mg/g. There was no interaction between clinical categories of eGFR and ACR (P=0.20). The adjusted hazard ratio for CKD, defined as eGFR
Notes
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PubMed ID
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