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[A follow-up of leukemia and drivers is needed]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature24493
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Mar 25;89(13):1041
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-25-1992
Author
B. Holmgren
Author Affiliation
Medicinska kliniken, Malmö allmänna sjukhus.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1992 Mar 25;89(13):1041
Date
Mar-25-1992
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Automobile Driving
Follow-Up Studies
Gasoline - adverse effects
Humans
Leukemia, Myelocytic, Acute - chemically induced
Male
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced
Risk factors
Sweden
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
PubMed ID
1372672 View in PubMed
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[Air pollution and cancer. A review of experimental studies]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature27038
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1982 Jun 7;144(23):1719-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-7-1982

[Air pollution and cardiovascular disease in Trondheim].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179678
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 May 20;124(10):1381-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-20-2004
Author
Bård Mannsåker
Torkel Vikan
Jonas Holme
Author Affiliation
Det medisinske fakultet, Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, 7489 Trondheim. mannsake@stud.ntnu.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2004 May 20;124(10):1381-3
Date
May-20-2004
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute Disease
Air Pollutants - adverse effects
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology
Humans
Nitric Oxide - adverse effects
Nitrous Oxide - adverse effects
Norway - epidemiology
Ozone - adverse effects
Particle Size
Patient Admission - statistics & numerical data
Risk factors
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects
Toluene - adverse effects
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Xylenes - adverse effects
Abstract
There is some evidence linking air pollution to cardiovascular morbidity. Our aim was to examine whether there is a correlation between air pollution and cardiovascular morbidity in the city of Trondheim, Norway.
We compared the mean daily number of admissions for cardiovascular disease to the St. Olav University hospital on days with relatively low and high levels of PM10 (1993-2001), PM2,5, NO, NO2, SO2, O3, toluene and paraxylene (1998-2001). A time series analysis was carried out to see how day-to-day variations in concentrations of air pollutants correlated with the number of hospitalizations for cardiovascular disease.
In the bivariate analysis, the mean daily number of hospitalizations was found to be significantly higher (p
PubMed ID
15195175 View in PubMed
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[Air pollution, asthma and allergy--the importance of different types of particles]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature15327
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):1777-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-10-2002
Author
Heidi Ormstad
Martinus Løvik
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for miljøimmunologi, Divisjon for miljømedisin, Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt, Postboks 4404 Nydalen 0403 Oslo. heidi.ormstad@folkehelsa.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):1777-82
Date
Aug-10-2002
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Allergens - adverse effects
Asthma - chemically induced - etiology
Dust - adverse effects
English Abstract
Heating - adverse effects
Humans
Motor Vehicles
Particle Size
Respiratory Hypersensitivity - chemically induced - etiology
Rubber - adverse effects
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Particulate air pollution has been much discussed in Norway during the last few years. Coarse particles from asphalt are likely to have quite different properties than the far smaller particles from diesel exhaust. MATERIALS AND METHODS: On the basis of data from the literature and our own research, we discuss the health problem of different types of particles with a focus on allergy and respiratory symptoms. RESULTS: Diesel exhaust particles have well-documented adverse effects in relation to allergic airway disease. They increase symptoms load in already allergic individuals and also seem to contribute to the increased prevalence of allergy. PM10 is today measured on the basis of weight, not on number. Diesel exhaust particles are much smaller than road surface particles; hence PM10 measurements reflect road surface dust pollution more than exhaust particles. INTERPRETATION: Focus should now be given to diesel exhaust particles in order to reduce the adverse health effects of particulate air pollution in Norwegian cities.
Notes
Comment In: Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2002 Aug 10;122(18):176612362683
PubMed ID
12362688 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from traffic and cancer incidence: a Danish cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132837
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:67
Publication Type
Article
Date
2011
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Zorana J Andersen
Martin Hvidberg
Steen S Jensen
Matthias Ketzel
Mette Sørensen
Johnni Hansen
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Anne Tjønneland
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Environ Health. 2011;10:67
Date
2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis - toxicity
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure
Female
Humans
Incidence
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - chemically induced - classification - epidemiology
Nitrogen Oxides - analysis - toxicity
Residence Characteristics
Vehicle Emissions - analysis - toxicity
Abstract
Vehicle engine exhaust includes ultrafine particles with a large surface area and containing absorbed polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, transition metals and other substances. Ultrafine particles and soluble chemicals can be transported from the airways to other organs, such as the liver, kidneys, and brain. Our aim was to investigate whether air pollution from traffic is associated with risk for other cancers than lung cancer.
We followed up 54,304 participants in the Danish Diet Cancer and Health cohort for 20 selected cancers in the Danish Cancer Registry, from enrolment in 1993-1997 until 2006, and traced their residential addresses from 1971 onwards in the Central Population Registry. We used modeled concentration of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)) and amount of traffic at the residence as indicators of traffic-related air pollution and used Cox models to estimate incidence rate ratios (IRRs) after adjustment for potential confounders.
NO(x) at the residence was significantly associated with risks for cervical cancer (IRR, 2.45; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01;5.93, per 100 µg/m(3) NO(x)) and brain cancer (IRR, 2.28; 95% CI, 1.25;4.19, per 100 µg/m(3) NO(x)).
This hypothesis-generating study indicates that traffic-related air pollution might increase the risks for cervical and brain cancer, which should be tested in future studies.
Notes
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PubMed ID
21771295 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from traffic and risk for lung cancer in three Danish cohorts.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99386
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 May;19(5):1284-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2010
Author
Ole Raaschou-Nielsen
Helle Bak
Mette Sørensen
Steen Solvang Jensen
Matthias Ketzel
Martin Hvidberg
Peter Schnohr
Anne Tjønneland
Kim Overvad
Steffen Loft
Author Affiliation
Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2010 May;19(5):1284-91
Date
May-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Vehicle Emissions
Young Adult
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Air pollution is suspected to cause lung cancer. The purpose was to investigate whether the concentration of nitrogen oxides (NOx) at the residence, used as an indicator of air pollution from traffic, is associated with risk for lung cancer. METHODS: We identified 679 lung cancer cases in the Danish Cancer Registry from the members of three prospective cohorts and selected a comparison group of 3,481 persons from the same cohorts in a case-cohort design. Residential addresses from January 1, 1971, were traced in the Central Population Registry. The NOx concentration at each address was calculated by dispersion models, and the time-weighted average concentration for all addresses was calculated for each person. We used Cox models to estimate incidence rate ratios after adjustment for smoking (status, duration, and intensity), educational level, body mass index, and alcohol consumption. RESULTS: The incidence rate ratios for lung cancer were 1.30 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.07-1.57] and 1.45 (95% CI, 1.12-1.88) for NOx concentrations of 30 to 72 and >72 microg/m3, respectively, when compared with
PubMed ID
20447920 View in PubMed
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Air pollution from traffic at the residence of children with cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature19980
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1-2001
Author
O. Raaschou-Nielsen
O. Hertel
B L Thomsen
J H Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Strandboulevarden 49, DK-2100 Copenhagen 0, Denmark. ole@cancer.dk
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2001 Mar 1;153(5):433-43
Date
Mar-1-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Air Pollutants, Environmental - adverse effects
Benzene - adverse effects
Brain Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Case-Control Studies
Child
Child, Preschool
Denmark - epidemiology
Environmental Exposure - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Infant
Leukemia - epidemiology - etiology
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Maternal Exposure - adverse effects
Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects
Pregnancy
Registries
Reproducibility of Results
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Residence Characteristics
Risk factors
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Vehicle Emissions - adverse effects
Abstract
The hypothesis that exposure to traffic-related air pollution increases the risk of developing cancer during childhood was investigated. The authors enrolled 1,989 children reported to the Danish Cancer Registry with a diagnosis of leukemia, tumor of the central nervous system, or malignant lymphoma during 1968-1991 and 5,506 control children selected at random from the entire childhood population. The residential histories of the children were traced from 9 months before birth until the time of diagnosis of the cases and a similar period for the controls. For each of the 18,440 identified addresses, information on traffic and the configuration of streets and buildings was collected. Average concentrations of benzene and nitrogen dioxide (indicators of traffic-related air pollution) were calculated for the relevant period, and exposures to air pollution during pregnancy and during childhood were calculated separately. The risks of leukemia, central nervous system tumors, and all selected cancers combined were not linked to exposure to benzene or nitrogen dioxide during either period. The risk of lymphomas increased by 25% (p for trend = 0.06) and 51% (p for trend = 0.05) for a doubling of the concentration of benzene and nitrogen dioxide, respectively, during the pregnancy. The association was restricted to Hodgkin's disease.
PubMed ID
11226975 View in PubMed
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Air pollution modeling at road sides using the operational street pollution model--a case study in Hanoi, Vietnam.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature99898
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2010 Nov;60(11):1315-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2010
Author
Ngo Tho Hung
Matthias Ketzel
Steen Solvang Jensen
Nguyen Thi Kim Oanh
Author Affiliation
National Environmental Research Institute, Department of Atmospheric Environment, Aarhus University, Roskilde, Denmark. nth@dmu.dk
Source
J Air Waste Manag Assoc. 2010 Nov;60(11):1315-26
Date
Nov-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - statistics & numerical data
Algorithms
Circadian Rhythm
Environmental monitoring
Models, Statistical
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Vietnam
Wind
Abstract
In many metropolitan areas, traffic is the main source of air pollution. The high concentrations of pollutants in streets have the potential to affect human health. Therefore, estimation of air pollution at the street level is required for health impact assessment. This task has been carried out in many developed countries by a combination of air quality measurements and modeling. This study focuses on how to apply a dispersion model to cities in the developing world, where model input data and data from air quality monitoring stations are limited or of varying quality. This research uses the operational street pollution model (OSPM) developed by the National Environmental Research Institute in Denmark for a case study in Hanoi, the capital of Vietnam. OSPM predictions from five streets were evaluated against air pollution measurements of nitrogen oxides (NO(x)), sulfur dioxide (SO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and benzene (BNZ) that were available from previous studies. Hourly measurements and passive sample measurements collected over 3-week periods were compared with model outputs, applying emission factors from previous studies. In addition, so-called "backward calculations" were performed to adapt the emission factors for Hanoi conditions. The average fleet emission factors estimated can be used for emission calculations at other streets in Hanoi and in other locations in Southeast Asia with similar vehicle types. This study also emphasizes the need to further eliminate uncertainties in input data for the street-scale air pollution modeling in Vietnam, namely by providing reliable emission factors and hourly air pollution measurements of high quality.
PubMed ID
21141425 View in PubMed
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[AIR POLLUTIONS AS A RISK FACTOR FOR THE POPULATION HEALTH IN KAZAN CITY].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature266196
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 May-Jun;94(3):37-40
Publication Type
Article
Author
E A Tafeeva
A V Ivanov
A A Titova
I F Akhmetzianova
Source
Gig Sanit. 2015 May-Jun;94(3):37-40
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Air Pollution - adverse effects
Environmental Illness - chemically induced - epidemiology
Environmental monitoring
Health status
Humans
Inhalation Exposure - adverse effects - analysis
Morbidity - trends
Particulate Matter - analysis
Retrospective Studies
Risk factors
Tatarstan - epidemiology
Urban Population
Vehicle Emissions - analysis
Abstract
In the paper there are presented data on the hygienic evaluation of the air pollution in the city of Kazan as a risk factor for the public health. The largest contribution to the air pollution in the city of Kazan was shown to be endowed by vehicles. The proportion of vehicle emissions in total emissions in the city in 2012 amounted to 71.4%. According to monitoring data the average annual concentrations of pollutant substances in 2012 exceeded the hygienic standards for benzo (a) pyrene--in 2.5 times, soot--2.2 times, nitrogen dioxide--1.8 times, formaldehyde--1.7 times. The risk of inhalation exposure is assessed as high, the greatest contribution to the risk is contributed by suspended matter PM2.5, soot and nitrogen dioxide.
PubMed ID
26302556 View in PubMed
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270 records – page 1 of 27.