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1 H NMR study and multivariate data analysis of reindeer skin tanning methods.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature291047
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Apr-2017
Author
Lizheng Zhu
Andrew J Ilott
Eleonora Del Federico
Cindie Kehlet
Torunn Klokkernes
Alexej Jerschow
Author Affiliation
Department of Chemistry, New York University, New York, NY, USA.
Source
Magn Reson Chem. 2017 Apr; 55(4):312-317
Date
Apr-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Animals
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Multivariate Analysis
Plant Extracts - chemistry
Reindeer
Seasons
Skin - chemistry
Tanning - methods
Tannins - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
Reindeer skin clothing has been an essential component in the lives of indigenous people of the arctic and sub-arctic regions, keeping them warm during harsh winters. However, the skin processing technology, which often conveys the history and tradition of the indigenous group, has not been well documented. In this study, NMR spectra and relaxation behaviors of reindeer skin samples treated with a variety of vegetable tannin extracts, oils and fatty substances are studied and compared. With the assistance of principal component analysis (PCA), one can recognize patterns and identify groupings of differently treated samples. These methods could be important aids in efforts to conserve museum leather artifacts with unknown treatment methods and in the analysis of reindeer skin tanning processes. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
PubMed ID
27654838 View in PubMed
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4-Nonylphenol and bisphenol A in Swedish food and exposure in Swedish nursing women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125631
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2012
Author
Irina Gyllenhammar
Anders Glynn
Per Ola Darnerud
Sanna Lignell
Rob van Delft
Marie Aune
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency, P.O. Box 622, 75126 Uppsala, Sweden. irina.gyllenhammar@slv.se
Source
Environ Int. 2012 Aug;43:21-8
Date
Aug-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Benzhydryl Compounds
Breast Feeding - statistics & numerical data
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Endocrine Disruptors - analysis - blood - metabolism
Environmental monitoring
Environmental Pollutants - analysis - blood - metabolism
Female
Food analysis
Food Contamination - statistics & numerical data
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Maternal Exposure - statistics & numerical data
Meat - analysis - statistics & numerical data
Phenols - analysis - blood - metabolism
Sweden
Vegetables - chemistry
Young Adult
Abstract
4-Nonylphenol (NP) and bisphenol A (BPA) are phenolic substances used in high volumes by the industry. Studies on cells and in experimental animals have shown that both these compounds can be classified as estrogenic hormone disrupters. Information about the exposure of humans to NP and BPA is still scarce, especially regarding levels in human blood. The first aim of this study was to investigate possible sources of NP and BPA exposure from food, by analyzing the levels of NP and BPA from a Swedish food market basket, based on the Swedish per capita food consumption. A second aim was to investigate blood serum levels of NP and BPA, as well as NP-ethoxylates, among young women in Sweden (n=100). Moreover, associations between food consumption and blood NP and BPA levels were studied. In food, NP was to some extent found at levels above limit of quantification (LOQ 20 ng/g fresh weight) in fruits, cereal products, vegetables, and potatoes. BPA levels above LOQ (2 ng/g fresh weight) were found in fish, meats, potatoes, and dairy products. The estimated mean intakes per capita were (medium bound) 27 µg NP/day and 3.9 µg BPA/day, showing that food is a source of BPA and NP in the general Swedish population. In blood serum, free NP above limit of detection (LOD 0.5 ng/g) was detected in 46% of the study participants while detectable levels of total NP (LOD 0.8 ng/g) were observed in 43%. The corresponding percentages for BPA were 25% and 22%, respectively. The results indicate that there is a continuous source of exposure to NP and BPA that is high enough for free NP and BPA to be detected in some consumers. Among the participants with quantifiable levels of free and total NP (n=38), 85% (median, range: 38-112%) of the NP was present as free NP. For BPA 76% (49-109%) was detected as free BPA (n=15). All women had levels of ethoxylates of NP below LOD (0.1-0.7 ng/g). A significantly higher total consumption of fruits and vegetables was reported in questionnaires by participants with NP levels at or above LOD than among women with levels below LOD. This result is supporting the market basket results of relatively high NP levels in these types of food.
PubMed ID
22466019 View in PubMed
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Accumulation and distribution of mercury in fruiting bodies by fungus Suillus luteus foraged in Poland, Belarus and Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature276806
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Feb;23(3):2749-57
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2016
Author
Martyna Saba
Jerzy Falandysz
Innocent C Nnorom
Source
Environ Sci Pollut Res Int. 2016 Feb;23(3):2749-57
Date
Feb-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Agaricales - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Fruiting Bodies, Fungal - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Mercury - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Poland - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Republic of Belarus - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Soil - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Soil Pollutants - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Spectrophotometry, Atomic - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Sweden - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Vegetables - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - analysis - metabolism - chemistry - growth & development - metabolism
Abstract
Presented in this paper is result of the study of the bioconcentration potential of mercury (Hg) by Suillus luteus mushroom collected from regions within Central, Eastern, and Northern regions of Europe. As determined by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy, the Hg content varied from 0.13 ? 0.05 to 0.33 ? 0.13 mg kg(-1) dry matter for caps and from 0.038 ? 0.014 to 0.095 ? 0.038 mg kg(-1) dry matter in stems. The Hg content of the soil substratum (0-10 cm layer) underneath the fruiting bodies showed generally low Hg concentrations that varied widely ranging from 0.0030 to 0.15 mg kg(-1) dry matter with mean values varying from 0.0078 ? 0.0035 to 0.053 ? 0.025 mg kg(-1) dry matter, which is below typical content in the Earth crust. The caps were observed to be on the richer in Hg than the stems at ratio between 1.8 ? 0.4 and 5.3 ? 2.6. The S. luteus mushroom showed moderate ability to accumulate Hg with bioconcentration factor (BCF) values ranging from 3.6 ? 1.3 to 42 ? 18. The consumption of fresh S. luteus mushroom in quantities up to 300 g week(-1) (assuming no Hg ingestion from other foods) from background areas in the Central, Eastern, and Northern part of Europe will not result in the intake of Hg exceeds the provisional weekly tolerance limit (PTWI) of 0.004 mg kg(-1) body mass.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26446731 View in PubMed
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Aluminium in foodstuffs and diets in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59663
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1992
Author
L. Jorhem
G. Haegglund
Author Affiliation
Chemistry Division 2, National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Z Lebensm Unters Forsch. 1992 Jan;194(1):38-42
Date
Jan-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aluminum - administration & dosage - analysis
Animals
Beverages - analysis
Cereals - chemistry
Food contamination - analysis
Humans
Infant
Infant Food - analysis
Meat - analysis
Milk - analysis
Shellfish - analysis
Sweden
Tea - chemistry
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The levels of aluminium have been determined in a number of individual foodstuffs on the Swedish market and in 24 h duplicate diets collected by women living in the Stockholm area. The results show that the levels in most foods are very low and that the level in vegetables can vary by a factor 10. Beverages from aluminium cans were found to have aluminium levels not markedly different from those in glass bottles. Based on the results of the analysis of individual foods, the average Swedish daily diet was calculated to contain about 0.6 mg aluminium, whereas the mean content of the collected duplicate diets was 13 mg. A cake made from a mix containing aluminium phosphate in the baking soda was identified as the most important contributor of aluminium to the duplicate diets. Tea and aluminium utensils were estimated to increase the aluminium content of the diets by approximately 4 and 2 mg/day, respectively. The results also indicate that a considerable amount of aluminium must be introduced from other sources.
PubMed ID
1542992 View in PubMed
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Aniline in vegetable and fruit samples from the Canadian total diet study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149118
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2009 Jun;26(6):808-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Xu-Liang Cao
Jiping Zhu
Stephen Macdonald
Kaela Lalonde
Bob Dabeka
Mamady Cisse
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division, Bureau of Chemical Safety, Food Directorate, HPFB, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada K1A 0K9. xu-liang_cao@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam Part A Chem Anal Control Expo Risk Assess. 2009 Jun;26(6):808-13
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aniline Compounds - analysis
Canada
Carcinogens - analysis
Diet
Diet Surveys
Food contamination - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry - methods
Humans
Malus - chemistry
Reference Standards
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
An isotope dilution method based on solvent extraction followed by GC-MS analysis was developed and used to determine aniline in vegetable and fruit samples collected from the Canadian total diet study. Aniline was not detected in any of the 23 vegetable samples from the 2005 total diet study at a method detection limit of 0.01 mg kg(-1). Among the 16 fruit samples, it was detected only in apple samples, with an average concentration of 0.278 mg kg(-1). Aniline was not detected in apple samples collected in the 2002, 2003, 2006 or 2007 total diet studies, but it was detected in the apple samples collected from the 2001 and 2004 studies, at concentrations of 0.085 and 0.468 mg kg(-1), respectively. The average aniline concentration for the 2001, 2004 and 2005 apple samples was 0.277 mg kg(-1). Good repeatability of the method was observed with replicate analysis of apple samples, with relative standard deviations (RSD) ranging 3.8-21% and an average of 11%.
PubMed ID
19680954 View in PubMed
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Atmospheric deposition of trace elements around point sources and human health risk assessment. I: Impact zones near a source of lead emissions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature36598
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Sep 25;126(3):243-62
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1992
Author
L. Moseholm
E H Larsen
B. Andersen
M M Nielsen
Author Affiliation
COWIconsult, Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Sep 25;126(3):243-62
Date
Sep-25-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Air Pollutants, Environmental - analysis
Automobiles
Child
Child, Preschool
Eating
Electric Power Supplies - adverse effects
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Lead - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Middle Aged
Poaceae - chemistry - metabolism
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Vegetables - chemistry - metabolism
Abstract
The deposition of lead was monitored over 8 years in the area around a car battery factory north of Copenhagen, Denmark. The area also has heavy traffic. Deposition was measured by in-situ grown vegetables, transplant grass culture biomonitors, bulk deposition and soil samples. Three impact zones were identified by a multivariate statistical analysis. Within each zone, the total dietary intake of lead was estimated for adults and children as a percentage of the provisional tolerably weekly intake (PTWI), and as a result recommendation on restrictions in use of locally grown fruit and vegetables were given to the public. The pattern of lead deposition in the area during the period 1981-1988 was monitored and the amount of lead ingested via vegetables was toxically evaluated. Lead emission reduction measures introduced in the factory and in the traffic during the period produced significant reductions in lead deposition.
PubMed ID
1439754 View in PubMed
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Atmospheric deposition of trace elements around point sources and human health risk assessment. II. Uptake of arsenic and chromium by vegetables grown near a wood preservation factory.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature223063
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Sep 25;126(3):263-75
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-25-1992
Author
E H Larsen
L. Moseholm
M M Nielsen
Author Affiliation
National Food Agency of Denmark, Søborg.
Source
Sci Total Environ. 1992 Sep 25;126(3):263-75
Date
Sep-25-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Air Pollutants - analysis
Arsenic - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Chromium - analysis - pharmacokinetics
Denmark
Eating
Environmental Monitoring - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Health Status Indicators
Humans
Models, Biological
Soil Pollutants - analysis
Vegetables - chemistry - metabolism
Wood
Abstract
Kale, lettuce, carrots and potatoes were grown in 20 experimental plots surrounding a wood preservation factory, to investigate the amount and pathways for plant uptake of arsenic and chromium. Arsenate used in the wood preservation process is converted to the more toxic arsenite by incineration of waste wood and is emitted into the atmosphere. Elevated concentrations of inorganic arsenic and chromium were found both in the test plants and in the soil around the factory. Multivariate statistical analysis of the results indicated that the dominating pathway of arsenic and chromium from the factory to the leafy vegetables grown nearby was by direct atmospheric deposition, while arsenic in the root crops originated from both the soil and the atmosphere. Consumption of vegetables grown near the source would result in an increased intake of inorganic arsenic, but the intake via the total diet was estimated to be below the provisional tolerable daily intake for inorganic arsenic established by FAO/WHO.
PubMed ID
1439755 View in PubMed
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Canadian Total Diet Study in 1998: pesticide levels in foods from Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada, and corresponding dietary intake estimates.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature30285
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2004 Mar;21(3):232-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2004
Author
D F Rawn
X L Cao
J. Doucet
D J Davies
W F Sun
R W Dabeka
W H Newsome
Author Affiliation
Food Research Division (2203D), Bureau of Chemical Safety, Health Products and Food Branch, Health Canada, Tunney's Pasture, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0L2. thea_rawn@hc-sc.gc.ca
Source
Food Addit Contam. 2004 Mar;21(3):232-50
Date
Mar-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Canada
Child
Child, Preschool
Diet Surveys
Female
Fishes
Food Analysis - methods
Food contamination - analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Hydrocarbons, Chlorinated
Infant
Insecticides - analysis
Male
Maximum Allowable Concentration
Middle Aged
Organophosphorus Compounds
Pesticide Residues - analysis
Vegetables - chemistry
Yukon Territory
Abstract
The Canadian Total Diet Study is a national survey to determine the level of chemical contaminants in the Canadian food supply. Food samples were collected from Whitehorse, Yukon, supermarkets as part of the study in 1998. Whitehorse was chosen as a sampling centre, despite its small population (n = 19,000), to determine if residue levels were different in foods available in northern communities relative to levels observed in previous studies in the more populated south. Foods were prepared as for consumption before pesticide residue analysis. Residue levels observed in most foods were similar to levels observed in samples from previous surveys from southern Canadian cities. Malathion and DDE (1,1-dichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethylene), a transformation product of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl(ethane), were the two most frequently detected compounds (26.4 and 25.8%, respectively). The majority of pesticides, however, had a detection frequency of
PubMed ID
15195471 View in PubMed
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[Carbohydrate composition of vegetables and fruits used in nutrition of the Russian population].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186092
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2003;72(1):23-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
I S Marchenkova
A K Baturin
M M Gapparov
Source
Vopr Pitan. 2003;72(1):23-6
Date
2003
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbohydrates - analysis
Food - standards
Food analysis
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Nutrition Surveys
Russia
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
In clause the given literatures on structures of carbohydrates of vegetables, fruit, berry and nuts are resulted. The role separate carbohydrates and food fiber in ability organisms in discussion.
PubMed ID
12664695 View in PubMed
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Coenzyme Q10 in the diet--daily intake and relative bioavailability.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61957
Source
Mol Aspects Med. 1997;18 Suppl:S251-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
1997
Author
C. Weber
A. Bysted
G. Hølmer
Author Affiliation
Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark.
Source
Mol Aspects Med. 1997;18 Suppl:S251-4
Date
1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Availability
Capsules
Cross-Over Studies
Dairy Products - analysis
Denmark
Diet
Fishes
Food analysis
Food Handling
Meat - analysis
Swine
Ubiquinone - administration & dosage - analogs & derivatives - analysis - blood - pharmacokinetics
Vegetables - chemistry
Abstract
The coenzyme Q10 content of the average Danish diet was estimated from consumption data and from analysis of food items to be 3-5 mg coenzyme Q10 per day, primarily derived (64% of the total) from meat and poultry. To investigate if coenzyme Q10 was absorbed to any significant degree from a food item, a randomized cross-over study with single doses of coenzyme Q10 (30 mg/person), administered either as a meal or as capsules, was carried out in healthy subjects. The serum coenzyme Q10 concentration increased significantly, and the maximum concentrations did not differ significantly for the two forms of administration. The study indicates that coenzyme Q10 is present in food items and absorbed to a significant degree. Thus, dietary coenzyme Q10 may contribute to the plasma coenzyme Q10 concentration.
PubMed ID
9266531 View in PubMed
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