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The association of income with fresh fruit and vegetable consumption at different levels of education.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature145988
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;64(3):324-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2010
Author
T. Lallukka
J. Pitkäniemi
O. Rahkonen
E. Roos
M. Laaksonen
E. Lahelma
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, Finland. tea.lallukka@helsinki.fi
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 2010 Mar;64(3):324-7
Date
Mar-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Diet Surveys
Educational Status
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Fruit - economics
Humans
Income
Male
Middle Aged
Sex Distribution
Vegetables - economics
Abstract
This study examined whether the association of household income with fresh fruit and vegetable consumption varies by the level of education. Data were derived from mail surveys carried out during 2000-2002 among 40- to 60-year-old employees of the City of Helsinki (n=8960, response rate 67%). Education was categorized into three levels, and the household income was divided into quartiles weighted by household size. The outcome was consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables at least twice a day (58% among women and 33% among men). Beta-binomial regression analysis was used. Among women, higher income resulted in equally higher consumption of fruit and vegetables at all educational levels, that is, similar among those with low, intermediate and high education. Among men, the pattern was otherwise similar; however, men with intermediate education differed from those with low education. We conclude that the absolute cost of healthy food is likely to have a role across all income groups.
PubMed ID
20087380 View in PubMed
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Associations of Baltic Sea and Mediterranean dietary patterns with bone mineral density in elderly women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature292375
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Oct; 20(15):2735-2743
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-2017
Author
Arja T Erkkilä
Homa Sadeghi
Masoud Isanejad
Jaakko Mursu
Marjo Tuppurainen
Heikki Kröger
Author Affiliation
1Institute of Public Health and Clinical Nutrition,University of Eastern Finland,Yliopistonrantra 1C,PO Box 1627,FI70211 Kuopio,Finland.
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2017 Oct; 20(15):2735-2743
Date
Oct-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Absorptiometry, Photon
Aged
Animals
Anthropometry
Bone Density
Dairy Products
Diet
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Finland
Fishes
Food Quality
Fruit
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Assessment
Osteoporosis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Seafood
Surveys and Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
Dietary quality in relation to bone health has been analysed in relatively few studies. The current study aimed to assess the association of the Baltic Sea diet (BSD) and the Mediterranean diet (MD) with bone mineral density (BMD) among elderly women.
Lumbar, femoral and total body BMD were measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at baseline and year 3. Dietary intake was measured by 3 d food record at baseline. BSD and MD scores were calculated from food and alcohol consumption and nutrient intake. Information on lifestyle, diseases and medications was collected by questionnaires. Longitudinal associations of BSD and MD scores with BMD were analysed using linear mixed models.
Interventional prospective Kuopio Osteoporosis Risk Factor and Fracture Prevention study including women aged 65-71 years and residing in Kuopio province, Finland.
Women (n 554) with mean age of 67·9 (sd 1·9) years and mean BMI of 28·8 (sd 4·7) kg/m2.
Higher BSD scores were associated with higher intakes of fruit and berries, vegetables, fish and low-fat dairy products, and lower intake of sausage. Higher MD scores were associated with higher consumption of fruit and berries and vegetables. BSD and MD scores were associated with higher PUFA:SFA and higher fibre intake. Femoral, lumbar or total body BMD was not significantly different among the quartiles of BSD or MD score.
The lack of associations suggest that Baltic Sea and Mediterranean dietary patterns may not adequately reflect dietary factors relevant to bone health.
PubMed ID
28803596 View in PubMed
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Bacterial quality and safety of packaged fresh leafy vegetables at the retail level in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281743
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2016 Sep 02;232:73-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-02-2016
Author
L-L Nousiainen
S. Joutsen
J. Lunden
M-L Hänninen
M. Fredriksson-Ahomaa
Source
Int J Food Microbiol. 2016 Sep 02;232:73-9
Date
Sep-02-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carbon Dioxide
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Escherichia coli - isolation & purification
Finland
Food Labeling
Food Microbiology
Food Quality
Food Safety
Foodborne Diseases - microbiology - prevention & control
Listeria monocytogenes - isolation & purification
Oxygen
Plant Leaves - microbiology
Salmonella - isolation & purification
Vegetables - microbiology
Yersinia - isolation & purification
Abstract
Consumption of packaged fresh leafy vegetables, which are convenient ready-to-eat products, has increased during the last decade. The number of foodborne outbreaks associated with these products has concurrently increased. In our study, (1) label information, (2) O2/CO2 composition, (3) bacterial quality and (4) safety of 100 fresh leafy vegetables at the retail level were studied in Finland during 2013. Bacterial quality was studied using aerobic bacteria (AB) and coliform bacteria (CB) counts, and searching for the presence of Escherichia coli, Listeria and Yersinia. The safety was studied by the presence of Salmonella, ail-positive Yersinia, stx-positive E. coli (STEC) and Listeria monocytogenes using PCR and culturing. Important label information was unavailable on several packages originating from different companies. The packaging date was missing on all packages and the date of durability on 83% of the packages. Storage temperature was declared on 62% of the packages and 73% of the packages contained information about prewashing. The batch/lot number was missing on 29% of the packages. Very low oxygen (O2) (
PubMed ID
27257744 View in PubMed
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Carotenoid Intake and Serum Concentration in Young Finnish Children and Their Relation with Fruit and Vegetable Consumption.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297466
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Oct 17; 10(10):
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Oct-17-2018
Author
Marianne Prasad
Hanna-Mari Takkinen
Liisa Uusitalo
Heli Tapanainen
Marja-Leena Ovaskainen
Georg Alfthan
Iris Erlund
Suvi Ahonen
Mari Åkerlund
Jorma Toppari
Jorma Ilonen
Mikael Knip
Riitta Veijola
Suvi M Virtanen
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Unit, Department of Public Health Solutions, The National Institute for Health and Welfare, PO Box 30, 00271 Helsinki, Finland. marianne.prasad@thl.fi.
Source
Nutrients. 2018 Oct 17; 10(10):
Date
Oct-17-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Biomarkers - blood
Carotenoids - administration & dosage - blood
Child, Preschool
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Diet Records
Feeding Behavior
Female
Finland
Fruit
Humans
Infant
Male
Vegetables
beta Carotene - administration & dosage - blood
Abstract
Fruit and vegetable intake has been associated with a reduced risk of many chronic diseases. These foods are the main dietary source of carotenoids. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the associations between dietary intake and serum concentrations of a- and ß-carotene in a sample of young Finnish children from the population-based birth cohort of the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Study. The current analysis comprised 3-day food records and serum samples from 207 children aged 1, 2 and 3 years. Spearman and partial correlations, as well as a cross-classification analyses, were used to assess the relationship between dietary intake and the corresponding biomarkers. Serum concentrations of a- and ß-carotene were significantly higher among the 1-year-old compared to the 3-year-old children. Dietary intakes of a- and ß-carotene correlated significantly with their respective serum concentrations in all age groups, the association being highest at the age of 1 year (a-carotene r = 0.48; p
PubMed ID
30336644 View in PubMed
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Changes in socio-economic differences in food habits over time.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature134632
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Nov;14(11):1919-26
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Tina Seiluri
Eero Lahelma
Ossi Rahkonen
Tea Lallukka
Author Affiliation
Hjelt Institute, Department of Public Health, University of Helsinki, PO Box 41, FIN-00014, Helsinki, Finland. tina.seiluri@helsinki.fi
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2011 Nov;14(11):1919-26
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Diet Surveys
Female
Finland
Fishes
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines as Topic
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Socioeconomic Factors
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
To examine absolute socio-economic differences in food habits and their changes over time.
A longitudinal study using the cohort baseline mail surveys conducted in 2000-2002 (n 8960, response rate 67 %) and the follow-up in 2007 (n 7332, response rate 83 %), including data on seven food habits recommended in the national dietary guidelines, as well as socio-economic and sociodemographic variables.
Data from the Helsinki Health Study survey, followed up for 5-7 years.
Municipal employees of the City of Helsinki, Finland.
Apart from fish and vegetable-based margarine on bread, the proportions of the recommended food items were higher for women than for men. The consumption of the recommended food items either increased or remained stable over the follow-up period. On the basis of the slope index of inequality (SII) it was observed that socio-economic differences widened with regard to the consumption of fresh vegetables and fish and use of vegetable-based margarine or oil in cooking, with the upper classes consuming these foods more often. The largest differences were observed in the consumption of fresh vegetables, for which the SII value among women was 2·38 (95 % CI 1·93, 2·95) at baseline and 2·47 (95 % CI 2·01, 3·03) at follow-up, and 3·36 (95 % CI 1·80, 6·28) and 3·47 (95 % CI 1·95, 6·19) for men, respectively. Socio-economic differences were non-existent for milk, and the reverse was observed for dark bread and vegetable-based margarine on bread.
Consumption of the recommended food items increased in the examined cohort over time. This increase was mostly similar throughout the socio-economic groups and thus the socio-economic differences remained stable. The upper classes followed the guidelines better with regard to the consumption of vegetables and fish and in the use of vegetable-based margarine or oil in cooking.
PubMed ID
21557869 View in PubMed
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Common and country-specific dietary patterns in four European cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18057
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Dec;133(12):4246-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Helena F Balder
Mikko Virtanen
Henny A M Brants
Vittorio Krogh
L Beth Dixon
Frans Tan
Satu Mannisto
Rino Bellocco
Pirjo Pietinen
Alicja Wolk
Franco Berrino
Piet A Van den Brandt
Anne M Hartman
R Alexandra Goldbohm
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Epidemiology, TNO Nutrition and Food Research, Zeist, The Netherlands. balder@voeding.tno.nl
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Dec;133(12):4246-51
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Italy
Male
Meat
Meat products
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Netherlands
Principal Component Analysis
Prospective Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solanum tuberosum
Sweden
Swine
Vegetables
Abstract
The association between diet and cancer, predominantly investigated univariately, has often been inconsistent, possibly because of the large number of candidate risk factors and their high intercorrelations. Analysis of dietary patterns is expected to give more insight than analysis of single nutrients or foods. This study aimed to develop and apply a common methodological approach to determine dietary patterns in four cohort studies originating in Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden and Italy. Food items on each of the food frequency questionnaires were aggregated into 51 food groups, defined on the basis of their position in the diet pattern and possible relevance to cancer etiology. Exploratory factor analysis was used to analyze dietary patterns. Using a standardized approach, 3-5 stable dietary patterns were identified, explaining 20-29% of total variance in consumption of the food groups. Two dietary patterns, which explained most of the variance, were consistent across the studies. The first pattern was characterized by high consumption of (salad) vegetables, the second by high consumption of pork, processed meat and potatoes. In addition, a few specifically national food patterns were identified. Sensitivity analyses showed that the identified patterns were robust for number of factors extracted, distribution of input variables and energy adjustment. Our findings suggest that some important eating patterns are shared by the four populations under study, whereas other eating patterns are population specific.
PubMed ID
14652380 View in PubMed
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[Could the development of post-traumatic disorder can be prevented by drugs?].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature172150
Source
Duodecim. 2005;121(16):1705-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2005

Dietary antioxidants and the risk of lung cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225751
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Sep 1;134(5):471-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1-1991
Author
P. Knekt
R. Järvinen
R. Seppänen
A. Rissanen
A. Aromaa
O P Heinonen
D. Albanes
M. Heinonen
E. Pukkala
L. Teppo
Author Affiliation
Research Institute for Social Security, Social Insurance Institution, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1991 Sep 1;134(5):471-9
Date
Sep-1-1991
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antioxidants - pharmacology
Ascorbic Acid - pharmacology
Carotenoids - pharmacology
Cohort Studies
Dairy Products
Diet
Eating
Finland
Follow-Up Studies
Fruit
Humans
Lung Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Meat products
Middle Aged
Proportional Hazards Models
Retinoids - pharmacology
Risk
Selenium - pharmacology
Smoking
Vegetables
Vitamin E - pharmacology
Abstract
The relation between the intake of retinoids, carotenoids, vitamin E, vitamin C, and selenium and the subsequent risk of lung cancer was studied among 4,538 initially cancer-free Finnish men aged 20-69 years. During a follow-up of 20 years beginning in 1966-1972, 117 lung cancer cases were diagnosed. Inverse gradients were observed between the intake of carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C and the incidence of lung cancer among nonsmokers, for whom the age-adjusted relative risks of lung cancer in the lowest tertile of intake compared with that in the highest tertile were 2.5 (p value for trend = 0.04), 3.1 (p = 0.12), and 3.1 (p less than 0.01) for the three intakes, respectively. Adjustment for various potential confounding factors did not materially alter the results, and the associations did not seem to be due to preclinical cancer. In the total cohort, there was an inverse association between intake of margarine and fruits and risk of lung cancer. The relative risk of lung cancer for the lowest compared with the highest tertile of margarine intake was 4.0 (p less than 0.001), and that for fruits was 1.8 (p = 0.01). These associations persisted after adjustment for the micronutrient intakes and were stronger among nonsmokers. The results suggest that carotenoids, vitamin E, and vitamin C may be protective against lung cancer among nonsmokers. Food sources rich in these micronutrients may also have other constituents with independent protective effects against lung cancer.
Notes
Comment In: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Nov 1;136(9):1167-9; author reply 1169-701462977
PubMed ID
1897503 View in PubMed
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Dietary changes in Finland--success stories and future challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182675
Source
Appetite. 2003 Dec;41(3):245-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Ritva Prättälä
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute (KTL), Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland. ritva.prattala@ktl.fi
Source
Appetite. 2003 Dec;41(3):245-9
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Policy
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The paper describes dietary changes and related nutrition policies and interventions in Finland since the 1960s. Dietary changes are interpreted from the lifestyle perspective, in which food consumption patterns are assumed to be formed by the interplay of individual choices and structural chances, such as socioeconomic and cultural conditions. Finland can demonstrate a success story when it comes to decreased use of dairy fats and increased use of vegetables and fruit. However, the prevalence of overweight has increased. Nutrition policies and interventions together with sociocultural factors have supported the shift towards healthy nutrition. The same factors have promoted overweight, as well.
PubMed ID
14637322 View in PubMed
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51 records – page 1 of 6.