Skip header and navigation

Refine By

40 records – page 1 of 4.

[A quantitative assessment of the impact of diet on the mortality of heart disease in Denmark. Estimation of etiologic fraction]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature10365
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-11-2000
Author
M. Osler
J. Godtfredsen
M N Grønbaek
P. Marckmann
O K Overvad
Author Affiliation
Københavns Universitet, Panum Instituttet, afdeling for social medicin og psykosocial sundhed (Institut for Folkesundhedsvidenskab).
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2000 Sep 11;162(37):4921-5
Date
Sep-11-2000
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Coronary Disease - etiology - mortality
Denmark - epidemiology
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
English Abstract
Food Habits
Fruit
Guidelines
Humans
Myocardial Ischemia - etiology - mortality
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Vegetables
Abstract
INTRODUCTION: The aim of the present study was to quantify the impact of different dietary factors on the mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. METHODS: Relative risks and knowledge on the distribution of different dietary factors were used to estimate etiological fractions. RESULTS: It is estimated that an intake of fruit and vegetables and saturated fat as recommended would prevent 12 and 22%, respectively, of deaths from ischaemic heart disease in Denmark. An intake of fish among those at high risk for ischaemic heart disease, would lead to a 26% lower mortality, while alcohol intake among abstainers would have no significant quantitative effect. DISCUSSION: These results suggest that changes in dietary habits according to current recommendations would have an impact on public health in Denmark.
PubMed ID
11002740 View in PubMed
Less detail

Challenges in planning long-term care menus that meet dietary recommendations.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature113236
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):84-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Navita Viveky
Jennifer Billinsky
Lilian Thorpe
Jane Alcorn
Susan J Whiting
Thomas Hadjistavropoulos
Author Affiliation
College of Pharmacy & Nutrition, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada.
Source
Can J Diet Pract Res. 2013;74(2):84-7
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Canada
Cereals
Dairy Products
Diet - standards
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Fatty Acids, Omega-3 - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Long-Term Care - methods
Male
Nutritive Value
Recommended dietary allowances
Trace Elements - administration & dosage
Vegetables
Vitamins - administration & dosage
Abstract
Long-term care (LTC) homes plan menus based on Eating Well with Canada's Food Guide (CFG) recommendations for older adults. To determine whether recommended CFG servings and nutrients were being provided, we analyzed the menu of a large LTC facility in a metropolitan area and compared our analysis with a similar one conducted in 2000.
A full week's menu from a large Saskatoon LTC facility was analyzed and compared with CFG and recent Dietary Recommended Intake nutrient recommendations. The menu was analyzed using The Food Processor SQL. The 2011 menu was compared with the similar 2000 menu analysis to permit an evaluation of changes over a decade.
The 2011 menu demonstrated a significant improvement in servings of vegetables and fruit (4.6 to 7.2 servings). Servings of grain products had declined from 4.9 to 3.6 and servings of milk and alternatives had declined from 2.4 to 1.2 since 2000. Servings of meat and alternatives, total carbohydrate, and protein were not significantly different. Foods on the 2011 menu were lower in fat and higher in dietary fibre and offered more vitamins and minerals.
Greater attention to the planning of LTC menus may explain improvements in the 2011 LTC menu. The current menu, however, needs to overcome the challenges that prevent it from meeting CFG recommendations for older adults.
PubMed ID
23750981 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dental status, diet and cardiovascular risk factors in middle-aged people in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature54842
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;22(6):431-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1994
Author
I. Johansson
P. Tidehag
V. Lundberg
G. Hallmans
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Research, University of Umeå, Sweden.
Source
Community Dent Oral Epidemiol. 1994 Dec;22(6):431-6
Date
Dec-1994
Language
English
Geographic Location
Sweden
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Comparative Study
Dentition
Diet
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Fruit
Heart Diseases - epidemiology
Humans
Hypercholesterolemia - epidemiology
Hypertension - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Obesity - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sex Factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to compare the dietary intake and the levels of traditional cardiovascular (CVD) risk factors in edentulous middle-aged individuals and individuals of the same age and sex who still had natural teeth. The study was performed within the framework of the MONICA-project. Population registers were used to sample randomly 1287 men and 1330 women aged 25-64 yr. Data were collected from a mailed questionnaire, blood analyses, registrations of blood pressure and anthropometric measures. The estimated daily energy intake did not differ between the two groups, but edentulous men and women ate more sweet snacks compared to those who still had teeth. Edentulous men also ate less fruits, vegetables and fibre and edentulous women ate more fat than dentates. Edentulous men and women were more obese and had lower serum HDL-cholesterol concentrations than those with remaining teeth. Edentulous women also had significantly higher concentrations of total cholesterol and triglycerides in serum than dentate women. Edentulous men and women were more often regular smokers, but not snuff users, than dentates of the same age and sex. Thus, the presence of two or more cardiovascular risk factors was more common in edentulous individuals than in those who still had natural teeth. In summary, these results support the hypothesis that edentulous middle-aged individuals have a more unfavourable risk factor profile for CVD. Counselling on balanced dietary habits and non-smoking given by dental personnel to orally diseased patients--recommendations given to improve resistance to dental caries or periodontitis--might therefore improve general health and possibly also improve risk factors for CVD.
PubMed ID
7882658 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of a recommended food intake pattern for healthy Danish adolescents consistent with the Danish dietary guidelines, nutrient recommendations and national food preferences.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature91862
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2008 Oct;21(5):451-63
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Biltoft-Jensen A.
Trolle E.
Christensen T.
Ygil K H
Fagt S.
Matthiessen J.
Groth M V
Tetens I.
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutrition, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Søborg, Denmark. apbj@food.dtu.dk
Source
J Hum Nutr Diet. 2008 Oct;21(5):451-63
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Cereals
Child
Denmark
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Food Preferences
Health promotion
Humans
Iron, Dietary - administration & dosage
Male
Micronutrients - administration & dosage
Nutrition Policy
Nutritional Requirements
Selenium - administration & dosage
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Danish adolescents have poor dietary habits compared to current recommendations. The present study aimed to develop a recommended food intake pattern for adolescents consistent with Danish Dietary Guidelines (DDG), Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) and dietary preferences. METHODS: The nutrient content of a food intake pattern consistent with DDG was calculated using dietary intake data from a random sample of 11-15-year-old boys (n = 85) and girls (n = 70). A recommended food intake pattern was modelled to meet NNR. The discretionary energy allowance was calculated as the difference between the total energy level and the energy needed to meet recommended nutrient needs. The flexibility of the recommended food intake pattern was tested against various energy requirements and with the inclusion of basic foods with higher sugar and/or fat content. RESULTS: The developed food intake pattern meets all nutrient goals except for vitamin D. At low energy requirements, the intake of iron and selenium is of concern. To fulfil nutrient recommendations, half of the bread/cereals and vegetables consumed should be fibre-rich, and fats should be of plant origin. CONCLUSIONS: The recommended food intake pattern meets most nutrient recommendations and makes it possible to advise on discretionary energy.
PubMed ID
18822064 View in PubMed
Less detail

Development of scales to measure dietary acculturation among Chinese-Americans and Chinese-Canadians.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194555
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2001 May;101(5):548-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
J A Satia
R E Patterson
A R Kristal
T G Hislop
Y. Yasui
V M Taylor
Author Affiliation
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Cancer Prevention Research Program, 1100 Fairview Ave, N, MP-702, Seattle, WA 98109-1024, USA.
Source
J Am Diet Assoc. 2001 May;101(5):548-53
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acculturation
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Asian Americans
British Columbia
China - ethnology
Cultural Characteristics
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Employment
Feeding Behavior - ethnology - psychology
Female
Food Habits - ethnology - psychology
Fruit
Health Planning - organization & administration
Humans
Marital status
Middle Aged
Minority Groups
Regression Analysis
Time Factors
Vegetables
Washington
Abstract
To develop simple scales to measure a Chinese immigrant's adoption of Western eating patterns (dietary acculturation).
Data are from 244 less-acculturated women of Chinese ethnicity living in Seattle, Wash, and Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Interviewers collected information on sociodemographic characteristics, acculturation indices, items that reflect Western and Chinese dietary behavior, and consumption of fruits, vegetables, and fat.
Analysis of variance and linear regression analyses examined associations among dietary measures and acculturation variables, controlling for age, education, and city of residence.
We developed 2 scales to assess dietary acculturation: the Western Dietary Acculturation Scale and the Chinese Dietary Acculturation Scale, measuring Western and Chinese eating behavior, respectively. Although the population in this study was a less-acculturated sample, most participants reported some Western dietary practices, such as drinking milk (78%), eating cheese (78%), eating at Western fast-food restaurants (56%), and eating between meals (72%). Younger, highly educated women employed outside the home had the highest Western dietary acculturation scores (P
Notes
Erratum In: J Am Diet Assoc 2001 Jul;101(7):745
PubMed ID
11374348 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diet and colorectal cancer: Review of the evidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160342
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Nov;53(11):1913-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2007
Author
Milly Ryan-Harshman
Walid Aldoori
Author Affiliation
947 Oshawa Blvd N, Oshawa, ON L1G 5V7. ryanharshman@rogers.com
Source
Can Fam Physician. 2007 Nov;53(11):1913-20
Date
Nov-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Canada
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Dietary Supplements
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Fruit
Humans
Incidence
Male
Nutrition Assessment
Prognosis
Risk assessment
Vegetables
Abstract
To investigate whether diet has a role in the development and progression of colorectal cancer (CRC).
MEDLINE was searched from January 1966 to December 2006 for articles on the relationship between diet and CRC using the key words colorectal cancer and folic acid, calcium, vitamin D, red meat, or fibre. Evidence that these factors are associated with CRC came from case-control and prospective cohort studies and some clinical trials.
Whether red meat is a culprit in causing CRC remains unanswered, although any effect it might have is likely moderate and related to processing or cooking. The effect of dietary fibre on risk of CRC has also been difficult to determine because fibre intake is generally low. Evidence that folic acid, calcium, and vitamin D reduce risk of CRC is stronger. In particular, recent research indicates that calcium and vitamin D might act together, rather than separately, to reduce the risk of colorectal adenomas. There might also be an interaction between low folate levels and high alcohol consumption and CRC.
Before dispensing dietary advice, physicians should understand the potential benefits and harm of specific components of various foods. People might be able to reduce their risk of CRC by increasing their vitamin and mineral levels through eating more vegetables and fruit. Multivitamin and mineral supplements can complement a healthy diet.
Notes
Cites: Carcinogenesis. 1999 Dec;20(12):2311-610590225
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2003 Dec 3;95(23):1765-7114652238
Cites: Ann Oncol. 1999;10 Suppl 6:61-310676554
Cites: Cancer Invest. 2000;18(5):411-610834024
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2000 Aug;11(7):579-8810977102
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2000 Oct;36(16):2115-911044650
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1981 Jun;66(6):1191-3087017215
Cites: Gastroenterology. 1989 Aug;97(2):255-92568304
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1991 Sep 9;49(2):161-71652565
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1992 Jan 21;50(2):223-91730516
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1992 Jan 15;84(2):91-81310511
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1993 Jun 2;85(11):875-848492316
Cites: Cancer Res. 1994 Jun 15;54(12):3186-908205538
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1994 Dec;70(6):1150-57981067
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1995 Apr 19;87(8):598-6037752258
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1995 Oct-Nov;4(7):709-148672986
Cites: Chem Biol Interact. 1996 Mar 8;100(1):13-258599852
Cites: Int J Cancer. 1996 Mar 28;66(1):60-48608968
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1996 Jul;74(1):145-518679449
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1996 Oct 2;88(19):1375-828827015
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Jul;5(7):487-948827351
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1996 Nov;5(11):897-9008922297
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1997 Mar;8(2):175-839134241
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 1997;28(3):276-819343837
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 1998 Oct 1;129(7):517-249758570
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 1998 Oct;27(5):788-939839734
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1999 Jan 14;340(2):101-79887161
Cites: J Nutr. 1999 Feb;129(2S Suppl):560S-564S10064332
Cites: Br J Cancer. 1999 Apr;79(11-12):1917-2210206314
Cites: Cancer Res. 1999 Sep 1;59(17):4320-410485479
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 1999 Oct;10(5):387-9610530608
Cites: Ann Oncol. 2005 Mar;16(3):489-51115668262
Cites: JAMA. 2006 Feb 8;295(6):643-5416467233
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 1997;29(1):83-99383789
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 1998 Jan 7;90(1):57-629428784
Cites: Digestion. 1998;59(2):148-569586828
Cites: J Natl Cancer Inst. 2001 Apr 4;93(7):525-3311287446
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 May;10(5):439-4611352852
Cites: Lancet. 2001 May 26;357(9269):1673-411425375
Cites: Eur J Cancer. 2001 Nov;37(16):2091-611597389
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2001 Nov;55(11):1000-711641750
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2001 Dec;10(12):1267-7411751444
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2002 Feb 20;97(6):864-711857369
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2002 Mar 10;98(2):241-5611857415
Cites: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2002 Mar;11(3):227-3411895870
Cites: Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2002;(2):CD00343012076480
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2002 Aug;13(6):551-6112195645
Cites: Int J Cancer. 2002 Dec 10;102(5):545-712432561
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 2002;43(1):31-812467132
Cites: Nutr Cancer. 2002;43(1):39-4612467133
Cites: IARC Sci Publ. 2002;156:481-512484238
Cites: Nutrition. 2003 Jan;19(1):7-1012507631
Cites: Eur J Clin Nutr. 2003 Jan;57(1):1-1712548291
Cites: Cancer Causes Control. 2003 Feb;14(1):1-1212708719
Cites: Int J Epidemiol. 2003 Apr;32(2):234-912714542
Cites: Lancet. 2003 May 3;361(9368):1491-512737857
Cites: Lancet. 2003 May 3;361(9368):1496-50112737858
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Jul 1;158(1):59-6812835287
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 2003 Oct 1;158(7):621-814507597
Cites: J Epidemiol Biostat. 1999;4(1):31-610613714
PubMed ID
18000268 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Diet and secondary prevention of coronary heart disease--are our recommendations good enough?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature53924
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 30;121(9):1092-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2001
Author
L K Johnson
I. Hjermann
S. Tonstad
Author Affiliation
Hjerterehabiliteringen Medisinsk avdeling Sentralsykehuset i Vestfold 3116 Tønsberg. lkjohn@frisurf.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2001 Mar 30;121(9):1092-8
Date
Mar-30-2001
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Coronary Disease - diet therapy - mortality - prevention & control
Diet, Atherogenic
Diet, Fat-Restricted
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Services
English Abstract
Fish Oils - administration & dosage
Food Habits
Humans
Lipids - blood
Oleic Acids - administration & dosage
Practice Guidelines
Randomized Controlled Trials
Vegetables
alpha-Linolenic Acid - administration & dosage
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dietary treatment plays an important role in prevention of coronary heart disease. In Norway as in other European countries, patients with established coronary heart disease are advised to follow a cholesterol-lowering diet. However, epidemiological observations have suggested that Mediterranean and other diets may have cardioprotective characteristics beyond their effects on serum total and LDL cholesterol levels. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We describe the results of randomised, controlled clinical trials that have investigated the effect of diet on secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. RESULTS: Diets characterised by high contents of oleic acid (18: 1n-9), alpha-linolenic acid (18: 3n-3) and fish or fish oil and near-vegetarian diets have reduced cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in patients with coronary heart disease. INTERPRETATION: Several characteristics of the Mediterranean diet seem to have additional anti-atherothrombogenic effects beyond those observed with the usually recommended cholesterol-lowering diet. We ask whether Norwegian dietary recommendations for secondary prevention, should emphasise more strongly the type of fat used and fruit and vegetable intake, in line with the principles of the Mediterranean diet. Such dietary advice should be incorporated into the medical treatment given to all patients with coronary heart disease, regardless of their lipid profile.
PubMed ID
11354888 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diet, an independent determinant for plasma total homocysteine. A cross sectional study of Norwegian workers on platforms in the North Sea.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61906
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1998 Jan;52(1):7-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1998
Author
A. Oshaug
K H Bugge
H. Refsum
Author Affiliation
Nutrition Institute, University of Oslo, Norway.
Source
Eur J Clin Nutr. 1998 Jan;52(1):7-11
Date
Jan-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Bread
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Homocysteine - blood
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
North Sea
Norway
Occupations
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether diet is an independent determinant for total homocysteine (tHcy) levels. DESIGN: Data on background variables was collected by questionnaire interviews, food intake by one 24 h recall and tHcy levels in a blood sample in 310 healthy men (mean age, 38 y). SETTING: Two oil producing platforms in the Norwegian sector in the north sea. RESULTS: The arithmetic mean (s.d.) and median tHcy levels were 10.4 (2.9) mumol/L and 9.9 mumol/L, respectively. In a covariance analysis, mean adjusted plasma tHcy decreased by 7-21% from no intake to highest category of intake of bread, vegetables, and skimmed milk, and increased by 8-9% from less than 30% to above 35% energy from fat, and from no intake to one liter or more for coffee. Smokers had a lower intake of cereals, bread vegetables and fruits, but ate more fat and meat. Thus, smoking may have an indirect effect on the tHcy level through its effect on diet. In a multiple regression model, bread and vegetables were negatively associated with tHcy, while fat was positively associated. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that changes in diet may be an important means to lower the tHcy level in the overall population, and that dietary advice should be considered in subjects diagnosed with elevated tHcy levels.
PubMed ID
9481525 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary changes in Finland--success stories and future challenges.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature182675
Source
Appetite. 2003 Dec;41(3):245-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Ritva Prättälä
Author Affiliation
National Public Health Institute (KTL), Mannerheimintie 166, FIN-00300 Helsinki, Finland. ritva.prattala@ktl.fi
Source
Appetite. 2003 Dec;41(3):245-9
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Finland
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Life Style
Nutrition Policy
Socioeconomic Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
The paper describes dietary changes and related nutrition policies and interventions in Finland since the 1960s. Dietary changes are interpreted from the lifestyle perspective, in which food consumption patterns are assumed to be formed by the interplay of individual choices and structural chances, such as socioeconomic and cultural conditions. Finland can demonstrate a success story when it comes to decreased use of dairy fats and increased use of vegetables and fruit. However, the prevalence of overweight has increased. Nutrition policies and interventions together with sociocultural factors have supported the shift towards healthy nutrition. The same factors have promoted overweight, as well.
PubMed ID
14637322 View in PubMed
Less detail

Dietary guidelines and patterns of food and nutrient intake in Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature61782
Source
Br J Nutr. 1999 Apr;81 Suppl 2:S113-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
W. Becker
Author Affiliation
National Food Administration, Uppsala, Sweden. wube@slv.se
Source
Br J Nutr. 1999 Apr;81 Suppl 2:S113-7
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Diet Surveys
Dietary Carbohydrates - administration & dosage
Dietary Fats - administration & dosage
Dietary Fiber - administration & dosage
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nutrition Policy
Sweden
Vegetables
Abstract
The Nordic and Swedish Nutrition Recommendations emphasize the balance between macronutrients in the diet. The amount of saturated and total fat should be limited to c. 10 %energy and 30 %energy, respectively, and the amount of total carbohydrates should be 55-60 %energy. Data from the first Swedish national dietary survey in 1989 show that the average diet is too high in fat, especially saturated fat (36-37 %energy and 16 %energy, respectively) while the content of total carbohydrates and dietary fibre is too low. However, parts of the population consume a diet that meets the recommendation for a particular macronutrient. A comparison of subjects with a low or high intake of total fat and saturated fat, dietary fibre or fruit and vegetables show some common trends with respect to the characteristics of a dietary pattern equal or close to the recommendations, e.g. more frequent consumption of fruit and vegetables and a lower consumption of some fat-rich foods, such as spreads, cheese and sausages.
PubMed ID
10999035 View in PubMed
Less detail

40 records – page 1 of 4.