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Adherence to a Healthy Nordic Diet and Risk of Stroke: A Danish Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature282576
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2017
Author
Camilla Plambeck Hansen
Kim Overvad
Cecilie Kyrø
Anja Olsen
Anne Tjønneland
Søren Paaske Johnsen
Marianne Uhre Jakobsen
Christina Catherine Dahm
Source
Stroke. 2017 Feb;48(2):259-264
Date
Feb-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Cohort Studies
Denmark - epidemiology
Diet, Mediterranean
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health Promotion - methods
Healthy Diet - methods
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Registries
Risk factors
Scandinavian and Nordic Countries - epidemiology
Stroke - diet therapy - epidemiology - prevention & control
Vegetables
Whole Grains
Abstract
Specific dietary patterns, including the Mediterranean diet, have been associated with stroke prevention. Our aim was to investigate whether adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, including fish, apples and pears, cabbages, root vegetables, rye bread, and oatmeal, was associated with risk of stroke.
Incident cases of stroke among 55?338 men and women from the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort were identified from the Danish National Patient Register and verified by review of records. Cases of ischemic stroke were further subclassified based on etiology according to the TOAST classification system (Trial of Org 10172 in Acute Stroke Treatment). Information on diet was collected at baseline (1993-1997) using a semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate hazards ratios of total stroke and subtypes of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke.
During a median follow-up of 13.5 years, 2283 cases of incident stroke were verified, including 1879 ischemic strokes. Adherence to a healthy Nordic diet, as reflected by a higher Healthy Nordic Food Index score, was associated with a lower risk of stroke. The hazards ratio comparing an index score of 4 to 6 (high adherence) with an index score of 0 to 1 (low adherence) was 0.86 (95% confidence interval 0.76-0.98) for total stroke. Inverse associations were observed for ischemic stroke, including large-artery atherosclerosis. No trend was observed for hemorrhagic stroke; however, a statistically insignificant trend was observed for intracerebral hemorrhage.
Our findings suggest that a healthy Nordic diet may be recommended for the prevention of stroke.
PubMed ID
28049735 View in PubMed
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Adherence to a healthy Nordic food index is associated with a lower incidence of colorectal cancer in women: the Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature121827
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-14-2013
Author
Cecilie Kyrø
Guri Skeie
Steffen Loft
Kim Overvad
Jane Christensen
Anne Tjønneland
Anja Olsen
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society Research Center, Strandboulevarden 49, 2100 Copenhagen Ø, Denmark.
Source
Br J Nutr. 2013 Mar 14;109(5):920-7
Date
Mar-14-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Avena sativa
Brassica
Bread
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Diet
Female
Fishes
Fruit
Health promotion
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Norway
Pyrus
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - prevention & control
Secale cereale
Vegetables
Abstract
Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a multi-factorial disease in which diet is believed to play a role. Little is known about the health effects of specific regional diets. The Nordic diet is high in fat and sugar but also includes a range of traditional products with anticipated health-promoting effects. The aim of this cohort study was to determine whether a healthy Nordic food index consisting of fish, cabbage, rye bread, oatmeal, apples, pears and root vegetables was related to CRC incidence. Data were obtained from a prospective cohort study of 57,053 Danish men and women aged 50-64 years, of whom 1025 developed CRC (13 years' follow-up). Incidence rate ratios (IRR) with 95 % CI were calculated from Cox proportional hazard models. Women who strongly adhered to a healthy Nordic food index had a 35 % lower incidence of CRC than women with poor adherence (adjusted IRR, 0·65; 95 % CI 0·46, 0·94); a similar tendency was found for men. Women had a 9 % lower incidence of CRC per point adherence to the healthy Nordic food index, but no significant effect was found for men. A regional diet based on healthy Nordic food items was therefore associated with a lower incidence of CRC in women. The protective effect was of the same magnitude as previously found for the Mediterranean diet, suggesting that healthy regional diets should be promoted in order to ensure health; this will also preserve cultural heredity and the environment.
Notes
Erratum In: Br J Nutr. 2014 Feb;111(4):758-9
PubMed ID
22874538 View in PubMed
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Association between fruit and vegetable consumption and birth weight: a prospective study among 43,585 Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79617
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(6):616-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Mikkelsen Tina B
Osler Merete
Orozova-Bekkevold Ivanka
Knudsen Vibeke K
Olsen Sjurdur F
Author Affiliation
Maternal Nutrition Group, Danish Epidemiology Science Centre, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, DK-2300 Copenhagen S, Denmark. tbs@ssi.dk
Source
Scand J Public Health. 2006;34(6):616-22
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Denmark
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Fruit
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Interviews
Pregnancy
Pregnancy outcome
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether fruit and vegetable consumption in pregnancy is associated with birth weight in a Western population. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study based on telephone interviews, a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ), and extractions of birth characteristics from national health registries. SUBJECTS AND SETTING: The 43,585 Danish women from the Danish National Birth Cohort who had completed the FFQ in mid-pregnancy and on whom information about birth outcome was available. The exposures were frequency of green leafy vegetable (GLV) intake and quantified intake of fruit, fruit and vegetables, and fruit and vegetables and juice. The outcomes were birth weight and z-score for expected birth weight adjusted for sex and gestation week. Information on maternal height, weight, smoking, and other potential confounders was obtained through telephone interviews. RESULTS: Significant associations were found for all exposures to fruit and vegetable intake with birth weight and most with z-score. The strongest association was found for fruit intake in which case birth weight increased by 10.7 g (95% CI 7.3-14.2) per quintile. All associations were stronger among lean women (BMI
PubMed ID
17132595 View in PubMed
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Cardiovascular event risk in relation to dietary fat intake in middle-aged individuals: data from The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature87753
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2007 Oct;14(5):701-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Leosdottir Margret
Nilsson Peter M
Nilsson Jan-Ake
Berglund Göran
Author Affiliation
Department of Cardiology, Lund University, University Hospital (UMAS), Malmö, Sweden. Margret.Leosdottir@med.lu.se
Source
Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil. 2007 Oct;14(5):701-6
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcohol Drinking
Cardiovascular Diseases - chemically induced - diet therapy - etiology - prevention & control
Cohort Studies
Diet
Diet, Fat-Restricted
Dietary Fats - pharmacology
Dietary Fiber
Energy intake
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Risk factors
Sweden
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND AND DESIGN: The hypothesis that diets rich in total and saturated fat and poor in unsaturated fats increase the risk for cardiovascular disease is still vividly debated. The aim of this study was to examine whether total fat, saturated fat, or unsaturated fat intakes are independent risk factors for cardiovascular events in a large population-based cohort. METHODS: 28 098 middle-aged individuals (61% women) participated in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study between 1991 and 1996. In this analysis, individuals with an earlier history of cardiovascular disease were excluded. With adjustments made for confounding by age and various anthropometric, social, dietary, and life-style factors, hazard ratios (HR) were estimated for individuals categorized by quartiles of fat intake [HR (95% confidence interval, CI), Cox's regression model]. RESULTS: No trend towards higher cardiovascular event risk for women or men with higher total or saturated fat intakes, was observed. Total fat: HR (95% CI) for fourth quartile was 0.98 (0.77-1.25) for women, 1.02 (0.84-1.23) for men; saturated fat: 0.98 (0.71-1.33) for women and 1.05 (0.83-1.34) for men. Inverse associations between unsaturated fat intake and cardiovascular event risk were not observed. CONCLUSIONS: In relation to risks of cardiovascular events, our results do not suggest any benefit from a limited total or saturated fat intake, nor from relatively high intake of unsaturated fat.
PubMed ID
17925631 View in PubMed
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Changes and tracking of fruit, vegetables and sugar-sweetened beverages intake from 18 months to 7 years in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature265498
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:793
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
Mona Bjelland
Anne Lise Brantsæter
Margaretha Haugen
Helle Margrete Meltzer
Wenche Nystad
Lene Frost Andersen
Source
BMC Public Health. 2013;13:793
Date
2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Beverages
Child
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Dietary Sucrose - administration & dosage
Educational Status
Female
Food Habits
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Infant
Logistic Models
Male
Mother-Child Relations
Norway - epidemiology
Pediatric Obesity - prevention & control
Public Health
Questionnaires
Vegetables
Abstract
A few studies have investigated tracking of dietary patterns or nutrient intake in pre-school children, but no studies have been identified examining tracking of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), fruit and vegetable intakes in early childhood (1-7 year olds). The purpose of this study was to investigate changes and tracking of intakes of fruit, vegetables and SSB, and association between maternal education and dietary tracking, from 18 months to 7 years of age.
Longitudinal data from the nation-wide Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study, conducted by the Norwegian Institute of Public Health were used, including 9025 children participating at three time points (18 months, 36 months and 7 years). Frequencies of fruit, vegetables and SSB were assessed by questionnaire. Slightly different questions were used at each time point to collect information about intake. Maternal education was categorized into =?12 years, 13-16 years, =?17 years. Cross-tabulation, Spearman's rho and multinomial logistic regression were used for assessing change, tracking and differences by maternal education.
Analyses by gender indicated largest changes for intake of fruit and SSB from age 18 months to 7 years. Fair to moderate tracking coefficients (Spearman's rho = 0.23-0.46) for intake of fruit, vegetables and SSB were found and children assigned to low, medium and high frequency of consumption at 18 months continued to be in the same group at age 36 months and 7 years. Children of mothers with low education consumed fruit and vegetables less often and SSB more often compared to children of mothers with high education at 18 months of age. Children with higher educated mothers had lower odds for increasing fruit intake or decreasing SSB intake, compared to children with lower educated mothers showing a stable intake.
The tracking coefficients for intakes were fair to moderate and differences in intakes according to maternal education were found already at age 18 months. This suggests that promotion of healthy dietary behaviours at an early age is important to prevent unfavourable dietary behaviours later in childhood. Moreover, it seems important to target mothers in nutrition interventions for improving dietary habits among children.
Notes
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PubMed ID
24103398 View in PubMed
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Changes in beverage consumption from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy in the Norwegian Fit for Delivery study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature270544
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 May;18(7):1187-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2015
Author
Marianne Skreden
Elling Bere
Linda R Sagedal
Ingvild Vistad
Nina C Øverby
Source
Public Health Nutr. 2015 May;18(7):1187-96
Date
May-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alcoholic Beverages - adverse effects
Animals
Beverages - adverse effects
Coffee - adverse effects
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Diet - adverse effects
Educational Status
Female
Fruit and Vegetable Juices
Humans
Maternal Nutritional Physiological Phenomena
Milk
Non-Nutritive Sweeteners - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Norway
Nutrition Policy
Nutrition Surveys
Patient compliance
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Trimester, First
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe changes in consumption of different types of beverages from pre-pregnancy to early pregnancy, and to examine associations with maternal age, educational level and BMI.
Cross-sectional design. Participants answered an FFQ at inclusion into a randomized controlled trial, the Fit for Delivery (FFD) trial, in median gestational week 15 (range: 9-20), reporting current consumption and in retrospect how often they drank the different beverages pre-pregnancy.
Eight local antenatal clinics in southern Norway from September 2009 to February 2013.
Five hundred and seventy-five healthy pregnant nulliparous women.
Pre-pregnancy, 27 % reported drinking alcohol at least once weekly, compared with none in early pregnancy (P
PubMed ID
25221910 View in PubMed
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Changes in fruit, vegetable and juice consumption after the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes: a prospective study in men.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature281910
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(5):712-719
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2017
Author
Camilla Olofsson
Andrea Discacciati
Agneta Åkesson
Nicola Orsini
Kerstin Brismar
Alicja Wolk
Source
Br J Nutr. 2017 Mar;117(5):712-719
Date
Mar-2017
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Aged
Beverages
Body mass index
Citrus paradisi
Citrus sinensis
Cohort Studies
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - diagnosis - diet therapy - epidemiology
Diet
Educational Status
Exercise
Fruit
Humans
Life Style
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Smoking - epidemiology
Surveys and Questionnaires
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Given the importance of prevention of complications in type 2 diabetes (T2D), we aimed to examine changes over time in consumption of fruits, vegetables and juice among men who were diagnosed with T2D in comparison with men without diabetes. The prospective Cohort of Swedish Men, aged 45-79 years in 1997, was used to examine changes in diet after diagnosis of T2D. Dietary intake was assessed using FFQ in 1997 and 2009. In all, 23 953 men who were diabetes free at baseline (1997) and completed both FFQ were eligible to participate in the study. Diagnosis of T2D was reported by subjects and ascertained through registers. Multivariable linear mixed models were used to examine changes in mean servings/week over time. In total, 1741 men developed T2D during the study period. Increased consumption of vegetables and fruits was observed among those who developed T2D (equivalent to 1·6 servings/week, 95 % CI 1·08, 2·03) and men who remained diabetes free (0·7 servings/week, 95 % CI 0·54, 0·84). Consumption of juice decreased by 0·6 servings/week (95 % CI -0·71, -0·39) among those who developed T2D and increased by 0·1 servings/week (95 % CI 0·05, 0·15) in those who were diabetes free. Changes over time and between groups were statistically significant. Although improvements in diet were observed, only 36 % of those with T2D and 35 % of those without diabetes consumed =5 servings of fruits and vegetables/d in 2009.
PubMed ID
27409648 View in PubMed
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Changes in the stability of dietary patterns in a study of middle-aged Swedish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature82196
Source
J Nutr. 2006 Jun;136(6):1582-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Weismayer Christoph
Anderson James G
Wolk Alicja
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Epidemiology, The National Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden. weismayerc@gmail.com
Source
J Nutr. 2006 Jun;136(6):1582-7
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Cohort Studies
Diet
Diet Surveys
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Fruit
Humans
Meat
Middle Aged
Sweden
Time Factors
Vegetables
Abstract
Dietary patterns reflecting food habits may be associated with chronic diseases, yet little is known about the stability of these patterns. The objective of this study was to observe over time the stability of dietary patterns measured with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis. Four random subsamples of 1000 women between 49 and 70 y old were chosen from >60,000 women included in the Swedish Mammography Cohort. Subjects in these subsamples were administered a FFQ 4, 5, 6, or 7 y after the baseline questionnaire; 3607 of the women responded (90% response rate). The stability of dietary patterns was evaluated with Spearman correlation coefficients between pattern scores at baseline and follow-ups and by a test of internal stability, which evaluated the significance of changes within patterns between baseline and follow-up. We found 3 major dietary patterns: a healthy pattern, a Western pattern, and an alcohol pattern. Correlations between explored dietary pattern scores at baseline and at follow-up decreased from 0.59 (P
PubMed ID
16702325 View in PubMed
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Common and country-specific dietary patterns in four European cohort studies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18057
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Dec;133(12):4246-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2003
Author
Helena F Balder
Mikko Virtanen
Henny A M Brants
Vittorio Krogh
L Beth Dixon
Frans Tan
Satu Mannisto
Rino Bellocco
Pirjo Pietinen
Alicja Wolk
Franco Berrino
Piet A Van den Brandt
Anne M Hartman
R Alexandra Goldbohm
Author Affiliation
Department of Nutritional Epidemiology, TNO Nutrition and Food Research, Zeist, The Netherlands. balder@voeding.tno.nl
Source
J Nutr. 2003 Dec;133(12):4246-51
Date
Dec-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland
Food Habits
Humans
Italy
Male
Meat
Meat products
Middle Aged
Models, Theoretical
Netherlands
Principal Component Analysis
Prospective Studies
Randomized Controlled Trials
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Solanum tuberosum
Sweden
Swine
Vegetables
Abstract
The association between diet and cancer, predominantly investigated univariately, has often been inconsistent, possibly because of the large number of candidate risk factors and their high intercorrelations. Analysis of dietary patterns is expected to give more insight than analysis of single nutrients or foods. This study aimed to develop and apply a common methodological approach to determine dietary patterns in four cohort studies originating in Finland, the Netherlands, Sweden and Italy. Food items on each of the food frequency questionnaires were aggregated into 51 food groups, defined on the basis of their position in the diet pattern and possible relevance to cancer etiology. Exploratory factor analysis was used to analyze dietary patterns. Using a standardized approach, 3-5 stable dietary patterns were identified, explaining 20-29% of total variance in consumption of the food groups. Two dietary patterns, which explained most of the variance, were consistent across the studies. The first pattern was characterized by high consumption of (salad) vegetables, the second by high consumption of pork, processed meat and potatoes. In addition, a few specifically national food patterns were identified. Sensitivity analyses showed that the identified patterns were robust for number of factors extracted, distribution of input variables and energy adjustment. Our findings suggest that some important eating patterns are shared by the four populations under study, whereas other eating patterns are population specific.
PubMed ID
14652380 View in PubMed
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[Consumption of fruit and vegetables in a teenage cohort--observed changes]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature52569
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Jun 20;119(16):2327-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-20-1999
Author
N. Lien
K I Klepp
Author Affiliation
Johan Throne Holst institutt for ernaeringsforskning Universitetet i Oslo.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1999 Jun 20;119(16):2327-30
Date
Jun-20-1999
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Comparative Study
English Abstract
Female
Food Habits
Food Preferences
Fruit
Health Behavior
Humans
Life Style
Male
Norway
Vegetables
Abstract
The purpose of the study was to investigate the consumption of fruit and vegetables among boys and girls in a teenage cohort with respect to changes, gender differences and stability of consumption over time. In 1990, a representative sample of 13-year-olds from Hordaland county was recruited (n = 924) and surveyed regularly until the age of 19. The frequency of consumption decreased dramatically from the age of 13 to the age of 19. At the age of 13, 57% reported eating fruit daily, whereas only 21% of the boys and 37% of the girls reported eating fruit daily at the age of 19. Corresponding results for the consumption of vegetables showed that 42% reported eating vegetables daily at the age of 13, compared to 29% at the age of 19. No clear gender differences were found. The consumption frequency at group level at the age of 13 was a good indicator of the consumption frequency at a later age during adolescence. While younger adolescents until now have been at the focus of campaigns aimed at increasing fruit and vegetable consumption, our results point to the importance of focusing also on the older adolescents.
PubMed ID
10414196 View in PubMed
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64 records – page 1 of 7.