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Dietary patterns associated with colon and rectal cancer: results from the Dietary Patterns and Cancer (DIETSCAN) Project.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature17474
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):1003-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2004
Author
L Beth Dixon
Helena F Balder
Mikko J Virtanen
Bahram Rashidkhani
Satu Männistö
Vittorio Krogh
Piet A van Den Brandt
Anne M Hartman
Pirjo Pietinen
Frans Tan
Jarmo Virtamo
Alicja Wolk
R Alexandra Goldbohm
Author Affiliation
New York University, Department of Nutrition, Food Studies, and Public Health, New York, NY, USA. beth.dixon@nyu.edu
Source
Am J Clin Nutr. 2004 Oct;80(4):1003-11
Date
Oct-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Animals
Cohort Studies
Colonic Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Confidence Intervals
Factor Analysis, Statistical
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Follow-Up Studies
Food Habits
Humans
Italy - epidemiology
Male
Meat
Meat products
Middle Aged
Netherlands - epidemiology
Odds Ratio
Questionnaires
Rectal Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Registries
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Solanum tuberosum
Sweden - epidemiology
Swine
Vegetables
Abstract
BACKGROUND: An analysis of dietary patterns or combinations of foods may provide insight regarding the influence of diet on the risk of colon and rectal cancer. OBJECTIVE: A primary aim of the Dietary Patterns and Cancer (DIETSCAN) Project was to develop and apply a common methodologic approach to study dietary patterns and cancer in 4 European cohorts: the Alpha-Tocopherol Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention Study (Finland-ATBC), the Netherlands Cohort Study (NLCS) on Diet and Cancer, the Swedish Mammography Cohort (SMC), and the Ormoni e Dieta nella Eziologia dei Tumori (Italy-ORDET). Three cohorts (ATBC, NLCS, and SMC) provided data on colon and rectal cancer for the present study. DESIGN: The cohorts were established between 1985 and 1992; follow-up data were obtained from national cancer registries. The participants completed validated semiquantitative food-frequency questionnaires at baseline. RESULTS: Exploratory factor analysis, conducted within each cohort, identified 3-5 stable dietary patterns. Two dietary patterns-Vegetables and Pork, Processed Meats, Potatoes (PPP)-were common across all cohorts. After adjustment for potential confounders, PPP was associated with an increased risk of colon cancer in the SMC women (quintile 4(multivariate) relative risk: 1.62; 95% CI: 1.12, 2.34; P for trend = 0.01). PPP was also associated with an increased risk of rectal cancer in the ATBC men (quintile 4(multivariate) relative risk: 2.21; 95% CI: 1.07, 4.57; P for trend = 0.05). Neither pattern was associated with the risk of colon or rectal cancer in the NLCS women and men. CONCLUSION: Although certain dietary patterns may be consistent across European countries, associations between these dietary patterns and the risk of colon and rectal cancer are not conclusive.
PubMed ID
15447912 View in PubMed
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Dietary protein intake and risk of stroke in women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature122029
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Sep;224(1):247-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2012
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Jarmo Virtamo
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, 17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2012 Sep;224(1):247-51
Date
Sep-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cerebral Hemorrhage - etiology
Cerebral Infarction - etiology
Cohort Studies
Dietary Proteins - administration & dosage
Energy intake
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Plant Proteins - administration & dosage
Proportional Hazards Models
Prospective Studies
Risk
Stroke - epidemiology - etiology - prevention & control
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - etiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetable Proteins - administration & dosage
Abstract
A high protein intake may reduce the risk of stroke but epidemiologic data on protein intake in relation to stroke risk are limited and inconsistent. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that protein intake would be inversely associated with risk of stroke.
We conducted a population-based prospective cohort study consisting of 34,670 Swedish women who were free of cardiovascular disease and cancer in 1997. Diet was assessed with a food-frequency questionnaire. Incident cases of stroke were ascertained from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry. We estimated relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) using Cox proportional hazard regression model. During 10.4 years of follow-up, 1680 stroke events were identified, including 1310 cerebral infarctions, 154 intracerebral hemorrhages, 79 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 137 unspecified strokes. Intake of total and animal protein, but not vegetable protein, was statistically significantly inversely associated with risk of total stroke and cerebral infarction after adjustment for other risk factors for stroke. The multivariable RRs of total stroke for the highest versus lowest quintile of intake were 0.74 (95% CI: 0.61, 0.91; P for trend = 0.006) for total protein and 0.71 (95% CI: 0.57, 0.88; P for trend = 0.01) for animal protein. The associations were stronger in women with a history of hypertension (RR of total stroke = 0.56; 95% CI: 0.40, 0.78 for highest versus lowest quintile of total protein).
These findings suggest that dietary protein intake is inversely associated with risk of stroke in women with hypertension.
PubMed ID
22854187 View in PubMed
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Flavonol and flavone intake and the risk of intermittent claudication in male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179829
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(4):305-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
2004
Author
Tero Hirvonen
Markareetta E Törnwall
Pirjo Pietinen
Pasi Korhonen
Demetrius Albanes
Jarmo Virtamo
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Health Promotion, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. tero.hirvonen@ktl.fi
Source
Eur J Epidemiol. 2004;19(4):305-11
Date
2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Alcohol Drinking
Cohort Studies
Diet
Finland - epidemiology
Flavonoids
Flavonols
Humans
Intermittent Claudication - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Smoking - epidemiology
Vegetables
Wine
Abstract
The objective of this study was to investigate the association between flavonol and flavone intake and the risk of intermittent claudication in male smokers. The study population consisted of participants of the Finnish alpha-Tocopherol, beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study, who were free of intermittent claudication at study entry. These 25,041 male smokers were 50-69 years old at baseline. Participants completed a validated dietary questionnaire at baseline. The occurrence of intermittent claudication was assessed by annual administration of the Rose questionnaire. During the median follow-up of 4.1 years, 2412 new cases of intermittent claudication were observed. Dietary intake of flavonols and flavones was inversely associated with the risk of intermittent claudication when adjusted for cardiovascular risk factors (relative risk, RR in the highest vs. lowest quintile of intake 0.86, 95% confidence interval, CI: 0.75-0.98, p for trend 0.007). However, after further adjustment for intakes of vitamins C and E and total carotenoids, the association was attenuated (RR: 0.93, 95% CI: 0.81-1.08, p for trend 0.12). The risk of intermittent claudication was lower among men in the highest quintile of vegetable consumption (RR: 0.78, 95% CI: 0.69-0.89, p for trend 0.0001) and among wine drinkers (RR: 0.63, 95% CI: 0.41-0.98). Adjustment for flavonol and flavone intake only marginally changed these associations. In conclusion, flavonol and flavone intake was not independently associated with the risk of intermittent claudication.
PubMed ID
15180100 View in PubMed
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No association between fruit, vegetables, antioxidant nutrients and risk of renal cell carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature149090
Source
Int J Cancer. 2010 Mar 15;126(6):1504-12
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-15-2010
Author
Monica Bertoia
Demetrius Albanes
Susan T Mayne
Satu Männistö
Jarmo Virtamo
Margaret E Wright
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA.
Source
Int J Cancer. 2010 Mar 15;126(6):1504-12
Date
Mar-15-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Antioxidants - administration & dosage
Ascorbic Acid - administration & dosage
Carcinoma, Renal Cell - etiology - prevention & control
Carotenoids - administration & dosage
Diet - statistics & numerical data
Finland
Flavonoids - administration & dosage
Fruit - chemistry
Humans
Liver Neoplasms - etiology - prevention & control
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Prospective Studies
Questionnaires
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Vegetables - chemistry
Vitamin E - administration & dosage
Abstract
Previous epidemiologic studies that have examined the relationship between renal cell carcinoma (RCC) risk and intakes of plant foods and antioxidant nutrients have yielded inconsistent results. We therefore examined the associations between intakes of fruit, vegetables, carotenoids, flavonoids, vitamin E and vitamin C and RCC risk in the Alpha-Tocopherol, Beta-Carotene Cancer Prevention (ATBC) Study cohort. At baseline, 27,062 male Finnish smokers aged 50-69 years completed a 276-item dietary questionnaire that included questions on frequency of consumption and portion size. During up to 19 years of follow-up, 255 men developed RCC. Cox proportional hazards models were utilized to estimate relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI). Despite a large range in intake, no association was observed between fruit, vegetables or antioxidant nutrients and RCC risk. For example, multivariate RRs and 95% CIs for the highest versus the lowest quartile of intake were 0.79 (0.55-1.14), 1.23 (0.85-1.79), 1.09 (0.74-1.60), 0.83 (0.57-1.21), 1.09 (0.73-1.64) and 0.99 (0.67-1.46) for fruit, vegetables, total carotenoids, total flavonoids, total vitamin E and vitamin C, respectively (all p values for trend > 0.05). Our results indicate that diet may not play a large role in the etiology of RCC in male smokers, although further examination of these associations in nonsmokers, women and diverse racial populations is warranted.
Notes
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PubMed ID
19685494 View in PubMed
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Total and specific fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of stroke: a prospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature117468
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2013 Mar;227(1):147-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2013
Author
Susanna C Larsson
Jarmo Virtamo
Alicja Wolk
Author Affiliation
Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Box 210, SE-17177 Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.se
Source
Atherosclerosis. 2013 Mar;227(1):147-52
Date
Mar-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cerebral Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Cerebral Infarction - epidemiology
Diet
Dietary Fiber
Female
Fruit
Humans
Male
Malus
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Pyrus
Risk
Risk factors
Stroke - epidemiology
Subarachnoid Hemorrhage - epidemiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Vegetables
Abstract
Fruit and vegetables is a heterogeneous food group with different content of dietary fiber, vitamins, minerals, carotenoids, and bioactive phytochemicals. Our objective was to examine the relation between specific consumption of fruit and vegetable subgroups and stroke risk in a cohort of Swedish women and men.
We prospectively followed 74,961 participants (34,670 women and 40,291 men) who had completed a food frequency questionnaire in the autumn of 1997 and were free from stroke, coronary heart disease, and cancer at baseline. Diagnoses of stroke in the cohort during follow-up were ascertained from the Swedish Hospital Discharge Registry. A total of 4089 stroke cases, including 3159 cerebral infarctions, 435 intracerebral hemorrhages, 148 subarachnoid hemorrhages, and 347 unspecified strokes, were ascertained during 10.2 years of follow-up. The multivariable relative risk (RR) of total stroke for the highest vs. lowest category of total fruit and vegetable consumption was 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78-0.97; P for trend = 0.01). The association was confined to individuals without hypertension (corresponding RR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.71-0.93; P for trend = 0.01). Among individual fruits and vegetable subgroups, inverse associations with total stroke were observed for apples/pears (RR, 0.89; 95% CI, 0.80-0.98; P for trend = 0.02) and green leafy vegetables (RR, 0.92; 95% CI, 0.81-1.04; P for trend = 0.03).
This study shows an inverse association of fruit and vegetable consumption with stroke risk. Particularly consumption of apples and pears and green leafy vegetables was inversely associated with stroke.
PubMed ID
23294925 View in PubMed
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