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Cardiovascular biomarkers predict fragility fractures in older adults.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299736
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
03-2019
Author
Madeleine Johansson
Fabrizio Ricci
Giuseppe Di Martino
Cecilia Rogmark
Richard Sutton
Viktor Hamrefors
Olle Melander
Artur Fedorowski
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Clinical Research Center, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden.
Source
Heart. 2019 03; 105(6):449-454
Date
03-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adrenomedullin - blood
Aged
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Biomarkers - blood
Body mass index
Cardiovascular System - metabolism
Cohort Studies
Correlation of Data
Endothelin-1 - blood
Female
Fractures, Bone - blood
Humans
Independent Living - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Peptide Fragments - blood
Prospective Studies
Protein Precursors - blood
Reproducibility of Results
Risk assessment
Risk factors
Sweden
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
To assess the role of four biomarkers of neuroendocrine activation and endothelial dysfunction in the longitudinal prediction of fragility fractures.
We analysed a population-based prospective cohort of 5415 community-dwelling individuals (mean age, 68.9±6.2 years) enrolled in the Malmö Preventive Project followed during 8.1±2.9 years, and investigated the longitudinal association between C-terminal pro-arginine vasopressin (CT-proAVP), C-terminal endothelin-1 precursor fragment (CT-proET-1), the mid-regional fragments of pro-adrenomedullin (MR-proADM) and pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-proANP), and incident vertebral, pelvic and extremity fractures.
Overall, 1030 (19.0%) individuals suffered vertebral, pelvic or extremity fracture. They were older (70.7±5.8 vs 68.4±6.3 years), more likely women (46.9% vs 26.3%), had lower body mass index and diastolic blood pressure, were more often on antihypertensive treatment (44.1% vs 38.4%) and had more frequently history of fracture (16.3% vs 8.1%). Higher levels of MR-proADM (adjusted HR (aHR) per 1 SD: 1.51, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.28, p
Notes
CommentIn: Heart. 2019 Mar;105(6):427-428 PMID 30361269
PubMed ID
30322844 View in PubMed
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The effect of 6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 on renal function, arterial blood pressure, and vasoactive hormones during radical prostatectomy: a randomized controlled trial.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature261760
Source
Anesth Analg. 2015 Mar;120(3):608-18
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2015
Author
Anne Sophie Pinholt Kancir
Joergen Kühlwein Johansen
Niels Peter Ekeloef
Erling Bjerregaard Pedersen
Source
Anesth Analg. 2015 Mar;120(3):608-18
Date
Mar-2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acute-Phase Proteins - urine
Aged
Albuminuria - blood - etiology - physiopathology - urine
Aldosterone - blood
Angiotensin II - blood
Arterial Pressure - drug effects
Biological Markers - blood - urine
Blood Loss, Surgical
Creatinine - blood
Denmark
Double-Blind Method
Fluid Therapy - adverse effects - methods
Humans
Hydroxyethyl Starch Derivatives - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Kidney - drug effects - physiopathology
Lipocalins - urine
Male
Middle Aged
Plasma Substitutes - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Prostatectomy - adverse effects
Proto-Oncogene Proteins - urine
Renin - blood
Renin-Angiotensin System - drug effects
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
Although hydroxyethyl starch (HES) is commonly used as an intravascular volume expander in surgical patients, recent studies suggest that it may increase the risk of renal failure in critically ill patients. We hypothesized that patients undergoing radical prostatectomy and receiving HES would be more likely to develop markers of renal failure, such as increasing urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (u-NGAL), creatinine clearance (C(crea)), and decreasing urine output (UO).
In a randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study, 40 patients referred for radical prostatectomy received either 6% HES 130/0.4 or saline 0.9%; 7.5 mL/kg during the first hour of surgery and 5 mL/kg in the following hours; u-NGAL, urine albumin, C(crea), UO, arterial blood pressure, and plasma concentrations of creatinine, renin, angiotensin II, aldosterone, and vasopressin were measured before, during, and after surgery.
Thirty-six patients completed the study. u-NGAL, C(crea), UO, plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, p-creatinine, urine albumin, and arterial blood pressure were the same in both groups. Blood loss was higher in the HES group (HES 1250 vs saline 750 mL), while p-albumin was reduced to a significantly lower level. P-renin and p-angiotensin-II increased in both groups, whereas p-aldosterone and p-vasopressin increased significantly in the saline group.
We found no evidence of nephrotoxicity after infusion of 6% HES 130/0.4 in patients undergoing prostatectomy with normal preoperative renal function. Hemodynamic stability and infused fluid volume were the same in both groups. We observed an increased blood loss in the group given 6% HES 130/0.4.
Notes
Comment In: Anesth Analg. 2015 Mar;120(3):519-2125695570
PubMed ID
25627076 View in PubMed
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Effect of long-term enalapril therapy on neurohormones in patients with left ventricular dysfunction. SOLVD Investigators.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature215002
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1995 Jun 1;75(16):1151-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-1995
Author
C R Benedict
G S Francis
B. Shelton
D E Johnstone
S H Kubo
P. Kirlin
J. Nicklas
C S Liang
M A Konstam
B. Greenberg
Author Affiliation
Division of Cardiology, University of Texas Medical School, Houston, 77030, USA.
Source
Am J Cardiol. 1995 Jun 1;75(16):1151-7
Date
Jun-1-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Analysis of Variance
Arginine Vasopressin - blood
Canada
Chi-Square Distribution
Enalapril - administration & dosage - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Natriuretic Agents - blood
Norepinephrine - blood
Regression Analysis
Renin - blood
United States
Ventricular Dysfunction, Left - blood - drug therapy - prevention & control
Abstract
The aim of this study was to compare the long-term effects of treatment with enalapril or placebo on plasma neurohormones in patients with left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. Elevated neurohormonal levels are associated with increased mortality in patients with congestive heart failure. Multiple studies have shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors decrease mortality and morbidity in these patients. In Studies of Left Ventricular Dysfunction (SOLVD), enalapril significantly reduced mortality in patients with symptomatic LV dysfunction (treatment trial). In contrast, in patients with asymptomatic LV dysfunction (prevention trial), there was no significant reduction in mortality with enalapril therapy. The effect of enalapril was examined in 333 prevention trial and 129 treatment trial patients. Plasma norepinephrine (NE) and plasma renin activity were measured in these patients at baseline, and at 4 and 12 months of follow-up. In a subset of these patients, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and arginine vasopressin were also measured. Analysis of covariance models were used to determine the effect of enalapril on each neurohormone. Participants in the treatment trial had significantly higher neurohormonal levels when compared with those in the prevention trial or normal control subjects. In the treatment trial, patients taking enalapril had a greater decrease in plasma NE levels than patients taking placebo (p
PubMed ID
7762503 View in PubMed
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Ethnic, geographic and dietary influences upon vasoactive hormones and blood pressure among Greenland Inuit and Danes.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature5595
Source
Blood Press. 2003;12(5-6):298-306
Publication Type
Article
Date
2003
Author
Marit E Jørgensen
Michael B Pedersen
Charlotte Siggaard
Tina B Sørensen
Gert Mulvad
Jens C Hansen
Henning Skjoldborg
Erling B Pedersen
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Queen Ingrid's Hospital, Nuuk, Denmark. maej@steno.dk
Source
Blood Press. 2003;12(5-6):298-306
Date
2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aldosterone - blood
Angiotensin II - blood
Blood pressure
Blood Pressure Monitoring, Ambulatory
Denmark
Epidemiologic Studies
Ethnic Groups
Female
Food Habits - ethnology - physiology
Greenland - epidemiology - ethnology
Humans
Hypertension - epidemiology
Inuits
Male
Natriuretic Peptides - blood
Potassium - urine
Renin-Angiotensin System - physiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sodium - urine
Topography, Medical
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
AIM: To study levels of vasoactive hormones and urinary excretion of sodium and potassium between groups of Greenland Inuit and Danes, and to analyse the relationship between these hormones and 24-h blood pressure, including nightly blood pressure dips and pulse pressure. METHODS: 145 Greenlandic participants were categorized in three groups according to degree of westernization, based on dietary habits and current place of residence; 41 Danes were included as controls. Twenty-four-hour blood pressure was measured. Venous plasma concentrations of vasoactive hormones were measured. Urine was collected for 24 hours for analysis of excretion of sodium and potassium. RESULTS: The Inuit population of Greenland had a lower diastolic blood pressure, a higher pulse pressure and lower nocturnal blood pressure dip than Danes had. Angiotensin II in plasma and urine excretion of potassium were higher among Greenlanders compared with Danes, irrespective of diet and place of residence. Aldosterone and urine excretion of sodium were significantly higher among participants in Denmark compared with participants in Greenland. Brain natriuretic peptide and atrial natriuretic peptide were independently and negatively associated with diastolic blood pressure, and vasopressin was positively associated with systolic blood pressure and pulse pressure. Ethnic differences in the effect of vasoactive hormones or urinary sodium and potassium excretion could not explain the difference in blood pressure. CONCLUSION: It is suggested that a high dietary intake of potassium and low sodium intake among Greenlanders may affect blood pressure. Further attention should be drawn to the occurrence of high pulse pressure and high activity in the renin-angiotensin system in Inuit populations.
PubMed ID
14763661 View in PubMed
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Plasma immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin after ethanol intake in man.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11907
Source
Acta Physiol Scand. 1992 Feb;144(2):121-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1992
Author
J. Leppäluoto
O. Vuolteenaho
O. Arjamaa
H. Ruskoaho
Author Affiliation
Department of Physiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Acta Physiol Scand. 1992 Feb;144(2):121-7
Date
Feb-1992
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aldosterone - blood
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood - immunology
Diuresis - drug effects
Ethanol - blood - pharmacology
Humans
Male
Radioimmunoassay
Renin - blood
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sodium - urine
Vasopressins - blood - immunology
Water-Electrolyte Balance - drug effects
Abstract
To study the mechanisms of alcohol-induced diuresis, the plasma concentration of immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide and arginine vasopressin, serum sodium and osmolality, plasma renin activity and aldosterone, urinary sodium and volume, free water clearance, blood pressure and heart rate were measured in seven healthy men after oral intake of ethanol (1.5 g kg-1 in 6 h). Serum ethanol levels increased to 27 +/- 4 mmol l-1 (mean +/- SD) in 30 min and remained detectable for 14 h. Serum osmolality rose from 280 +/- 10 to 340 +/- 4 mosm kg-1 in 2 hours (P less than 0.01) and was 300 +/- 4 at 14 h (P less than 0.01). Formation of hypotonic urine began after the alcohol intake and resulted in a net loss of 0.9 +/- 0.1 kg water in 2 h. Free water clearance increased from -3.4 +/- 1.4 to 2.8 +/- 1.5 ml min-1 in 2 h (P less than 0.01). Plasma immunoreactive arginine vasopressin decreased from 5.7 +/- 2.1 to 3.3 +/- 1.3 ng l-1 (P = 0.05) in 30 min and increased to 17 +/- 25 and 12 +/- 10 ng l-1 at 6 and 12 h, respectively (P less than 0.05 for both). Plasma immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide levels decreased from 17 +/- 9 to the minimum of 11 +/- 3 ng l-1 in 2 h (P less than 0.01) and returned to the initial levels in 6 h. Serum sodium, plasma renin activity and plasma aldosterone increased maximally by 4 +/- 2, 165 +/- 153 and 143 +/- 101% (P less than 0.01 each) during 1-6 h.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
1533484 View in PubMed
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Plasma vasopressin, oxytocin, estradiol, and progesterone related to water and sodium excretion in normal pregnancy and gestational hypertension.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89172
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(6):639-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Risberg Anitha
Olsson Kerstin
Lyrenas Sven
Sjöquist Mats
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Cell Biology, Section of Integrative Physiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden. anitha.risberg@mcb.uu.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(6):639-46
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Estradiol - blood - physiology
Female
Humans
Hypertension, Pregnancy-Induced - blood - physiopathology
Kidney - physiology
Oxytocin - blood - physiology
Pre-Eclampsia - blood - physiopathology
Pregnancy - physiology
Progesterone - blood - physiology
Vasopressins - blood - physiology
Water-Electrolyte Balance - physiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations between plasma oxytocin and vasopressin concentrations and renal water and sodium excretion during normal pregnancy in comparison with gestational hypertension. DESIGN: A prospective open trial conducted in the 12th, 24th, and 36th weeks of gestation. SETTINGS: Seven antenatal clinics in Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty-seven normotensive women, 15 women with gestational hypertension, and five women with mild preeclampsia. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Hormones were analyzed with radioimmunoassay. Albumin, osmolality, sodium, and urea were analyzed by routine methods. RESULTS: Blood pressure was elevated in the hypertensive women and body mass index in mild preeclampsia from week 12. Renal sodium excretion did not differ between groups or weeks and mean renal free water clearance was negative. In normotensive women, the vasopressin concentration was 1.1+/-0.2 (week 12) and 0.7+/-0.1 pmol/L (week 36: p = 0.053). In hypertensive women, vasopressin concentration was 1.7+/-1.0 pmol/L, week 12, and 0.7+/-0.1 pmol/L in week 36 (ns). In normotensive women, oxytocin concentration increased from 23+/-1 pmol/L in week 12 to 48+/-3 pmol/L in week 36 (p
PubMed ID
19412798 View in PubMed
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Prognostic value of neurohumoral activation in patients with an acute myocardial infarction: effect of captopril.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature217429
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1994 Sep;24(3):583-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1994
Author
J L Rouleau
M. Packer
L. Moyé
J. de Champlain
D. Bichet
M. Klein
J R Rouleau
B. Sussex
J M Arnold
F. Sestier
Author Affiliation
Montreal Heart Institute, Quebec, Canada.
Source
J Am Coll Cardiol. 1994 Sep;24(3):583-91
Date
Sep-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aldosterone - blood
Analysis of Variance
Arginine Vasopressin - blood
Atrial Natriuretic Factor - blood
Canada
Captopril - therapeutic use
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - blood - drug therapy - mortality
Neurotransmitter Agents - blood
Norepinephrine - blood
Prognosis
Proportional Hazards Models
Renin - blood
Abstract
This study attempted to evaluate whether neurohumoral activation at the time of hospital discharge in postinfarction patients helps to predict long-term prognosis and whether long-term therapy with the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril modifies this relation.
Neurohumoral activation persists at the time of hospital discharge in a large number of postinfarction patients. The Survival and Ventricular Enlargement (SAVE) study demonstrated that the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril improves survival and decreases the development of severe heart failure in patients with left ventricular dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction
PubMed ID
7915733 View in PubMed
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The seasonal interrelationship between melatonin, vasopressin, and serum osmolality in elderly subjects.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature204444
Source
J Pineal Res. 1998 Sep;25(2):67-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1998
Author
R. Asplund
H. Aberg
L. Wetterberg
Author Affiliation
County Hospital, Strömsund, Sweden.
Source
J Pineal Res. 1998 Sep;25(2):67-72
Date
Sep-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Arginine Vasopressin - blood
Blood Physiological Phenomena
Circadian Rhythm
Female
Humans
Male
Melatonin - blood
Middle Aged
Osmolar Concentration
Seasons
Sex Characteristics
Sweden
Abstract
Plasma concentration of arginine vasopressin (AVP) and melatonin and serum osmolality were measured at noon and at midnight in individuals living in the northern hemisphere on March 22-23, June 13-14, September 26-27, and December 12-13 in 35 healthy volunteers (15 men and 20 women) aged 60-74 years. The nocturnal increase in melatonin was highest in the autumn and lowest in the winter in both sexes. The midnight serum osmolality level was lower in the autumn than in any other time of the year. In both the men and the women the AVP level was higher in winter than in any other season (P
PubMed ID
9755026 View in PubMed
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Vasomotor reactivity and catecholamine, arginine vasopressin plasma levels during ageing and development in rats.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature11495
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 1994 Nov 25;77(1):55-66
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-25-1994
Author
V. de Novellis
A. Filippelli
A. Loffreda
F. Rossi
Author Affiliation
Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Medicine and Surgery, 2nd University of Naples, Italy.
Source
Mech Ageing Dev. 1994 Nov 25;77(1):55-66
Date
Nov-25-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acetylcholine - pharmacology
Aging - blood
Animals
Arginine - blood
Arterial Occlusive Diseases - blood
Blood Pressure - drug effects
Carotid Artery Diseases - blood
Catecholamines - blood
Hyperlipidemia - blood
Hypertension - blood
Isoproterenol - pharmacology
Norepinephrine - pharmacology
Rats
Rats, Inbred Strains
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Vasomotor System - drug effects - physiology
Vasopressins - blood
Abstract
Vascular reactivity, heart rate responses to vasoconstrictor and/or vasodilatator agents and catecholamine and arginine vasopressin turnover were studied in normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY), spontaneously hypertensive (SHR), normolipemic Brown Norway (BN) and spontaneously hyperlipemic Yoshida (YOS) anaesthetized rats at 2, 6 and 18 months of age. In this study, we investigated whether ageing and development could affect cardiovascular reactivity to vasoactive substances and catecholamine and arginine vasopressin turnover. No significant changes in the pressor responses to noradrenaline and to carotid sinus baroreceptor stimulation were observed nor were there significant alterations in reflex tachycardia and bradycardia. Arginine vasopressin plasma levels also did not change with ageing and development. On the other hand, the hypotensive responses to isoprenaline decreased in old rats, acetylcholine relaxation effect increased with ageing and development in some rat strains (BN and YOS) and catecholamine plasma levels increased with ageing and development. Our results indicate that during ageing and development, vascular responsiveness to vasoconstrictor and/or vasodilatator agents, as well as amine turnover, may increase, decrease or not change at all depending on the neurotransmission system studied, and on the experimental model and/or animal tested.
PubMed ID
7731273 View in PubMed
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