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705 records – page 1 of 71.

A 2-year follow-up study of anxiety and depression in women referred for colposcopy after an abnormal cervical smear.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature85180
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jan;115(2):212-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2008
Author
Hellsten C.
Sjöström, K.
Lindqvist P G
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden. charlotte.hellsten@med.lu.se
Source
BJOG. 2008 Jan;115(2):212-8
Date
Jan-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Anxiety Disorders - etiology
Colposcopy - psychology
Depressive Disorder - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Referral and Consultation
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control - psychology
Vaginal Smears - psychology
Abstract
OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine if there were any long-lasting elevated anxiety levels in women attending colposcopy after an abnormal cervical smear. DESIGN: Prospective study. SETTING: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Malm�?�¶ University Hospital, Sweden. POPULATION: One hundred consecutive women were invited to participate when referred for colposcopy. METHODS: Women in the study group completed the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale-self-rate (MADRS-S) and had a psychosocial interview prior to colposcopy at their two follow-up visits. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: State anxiety levels and depression scores at first visit, 6 months and 2 years. RESULTS: At follow up, levels of state anxiety and the depression scores of the women studied had decreased and were comparable to those of Swedish normative data. Two variables from the MADRS-S, 'ability to focus on different activities' and 'emotional involvement with others and in activities' were the most prominent for women with moderate to severe depression. At the 2-year visit, 30% of the women still had a fear of cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Referral for colposcopy after an abnormal cervical smear does not seem to result in long-lasting anxiety and depression. However, a subgroup of women, with the initially highest depression scores, still had at 2-year state anxiety levels and depression scores significantly higher than normal. Almost one-third of the women still had a fear of cancer in spite of lower 2-year state anxiety levels.
PubMed ID
18081601 View in PubMed
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[3-year mortality of uterine cervix cancer in relation to the preliminary cervical cytological examination]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25769
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 1988 Oct 3;150(40):2400-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-3-1988

Abnormal cervical cytology is associated with increased nitric oxide release in the uterine cervix.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89757
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(4):417-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2009
Author
Rahkola Paivi
Mikkola Tomi S
Nieminen Pekka
Ylikorkala Olavi
Vaisanen-Tommiska Mervi
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2009;88(4):417-21
Date
2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Body Fluids - metabolism
Cervix Uteri - cytology - metabolism
Contraceptives, Oral - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Female
Humans
Menstrual Cycle - physiology
Middle Aged
Nitric Oxide - analysis - metabolism
Papillomavirus Infections - metabolism - pathology
Postmenopause
Sweden
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - metabolism - pathology - virology
Vaginal Smears
Young Adult
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: The human uterine cervix is capable of producing nitric oxide (NO). We studied the impact of cytological changes on the release of cervical NO. DESIGN: Population-based case-control study. SETTING: City of Helsinki, Finland. POPULATION: Cervical cytology tests and cervical fluid samples were collected in 297 women. METHODS: Cervical cytology tests, classified according to Bethesda criteria, were specifically analyzed for changes typically seen in human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and the level of NO metabolites (NOx) in cervical fluid was assessed by Griess reaction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The difference in cervical fluid NOx between normal and abnormal cytology. RESULTS: Cervical cytology was normal in 219 women and abnormal in 78 women. Among women with abnormal cytology there was both a higher detection rate (89% vs. 71%) and a higher concentration of NOx (median 22.5 micromol/l, 95% CI 14.6-31.9 vs. 11.0 micromol/l, 95% CI 8.0-16.7) compared to women with normal cytology. Age, parity, use of oral contraceptives, phase of the menstrual cycle, or history of miscarriage or termination of early pregnancy were not linked to an increased cervical NOx level. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical cell changes (suggestive of HPV infection) are accompanied by an increased release of NO in the human cervix. The significance of this finding remains uncertain, but in theory, increased release of NO could modify the outcome of cervical infection.
PubMed ID
19266358 View in PubMed
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Abnormal Papanicolaou smear. A population-based study of risk factors in Greenlandic and Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25362
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(1):79-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
1990
Author
S K Kjaer
P. Poll
H. Jensen
G. Engholm
B J Haugaard
C. Teisen
R B Christensen
K A Möller
B F Vestergaard
E M de Villiers
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1990;69(1):79-86
Date
1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Contraception Behavior
Cross-Sectional Studies
Denmark
Female
Greenland
Herpes Genitalis - complications
Humans
Papillomavirus
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Sexual Behavior
Smoking
Tumor Virus Infections - complications
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - diagnosis - etiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - etiology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
Possible risk factors for abnormal Papanicolaou smear were investigated in a population-based cross-sectional study. From Nuuk (Greenland) and Nykøbing Falster (Denmark), random samples of 800 women aged 20-39 years were drawn. Totals of 586 and 661 women were included in Greenland and Denmark, respectively. All women went through a personal interview, and had a gynecologic examination including a PAP smear and cervical swab for HPV analysis. A blood sample was taken for analysis of HSV type specific antibodies. Multiple sexual partners was the most important risk factor for abnormal cervical cytology (OR = 4.2). An infectious etiology was also indirectly supported by a relatively protective effect of barrier contraceptive methods (OR = 0.6). The simultaneous finding of HPV 16/18 as a significant risk factor (OR = 2.4) cannot be taken uncritically as support for a causal effect of this HPV type, since such a relationship between cytological changes of the cervix and HPV infection could also emerge if the positive PAP smear was not just a measure of intra-epithelial neoplasia but also an expression of the infection itself on the cervix.
PubMed ID
2161172 View in PubMed
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Abnormal Papanicolaou smears and colposcopic follow-up among American Indian and Alaska Native women in the Pacific northwest.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature4082
Source
J Am Board Fam Pract. 1995 May-Jun;8(3):183-8
Publication Type
Article
Author
T J Gilbert
J R Sugarman
N. Cobb
Author Affiliation
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Division of Public Health Services, Seattle, WA, USA.
Source
J Am Board Fam Pract. 1995 May-Jun;8(3):183-8
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alaska
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - ethnology - pathology
Colposcopy
Decision Trees
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Indians, North American
Northwestern United States
Prevalence
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Retrospective Studies
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - ethnology - pathology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Mortality that is due to cervical cancer among American Indian and Alaska Native women in the Pacific Northwest exceeds that among women of other races. Nevertheless, little information is available regarding the prevalence and follow-up of abnormal Papanicolaou smears among American Indian and Alaska Native women in the region. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective review of medical records of American Indian and Alaska Native women seen at 12 Indian Health Service and tribally operated clinics in Washington, Oregon, and Idaho who had an abnormal Papanicolaou smear in 1992. RESULTS: Of 4547 Papanicolaou smear results reviewed, 280 (6.2 percent) had an abnormal result (dysplasia or carcinoma in situ). Of the recommended colposcopies, 167 of 224 (75 percent) were completed. Women with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions were more likely to obtain recommended colposcopy than were women with low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions. Women treated at clinics that referred patients to outside providers for colposcopy were more likely to have colposcopy than were those who were offered the procedure on site. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of Pacific Northwest American Indian and Alaska Native women in Indian Health Service and tribal clinics with abnormal Papanicolaou smears and the proportion who receive colposcopy are similar to those in other populations. The higher rate of cervical cancer mortality among American Indian and Alaska Native women could be due to failure to screen high-risk women. Cytologic screening rates, methods to improve adherence to colposcopy recommendations, and the contribution of other factors to the cause of cervical cancer mortality need to be characterized in this population.
PubMed ID
7618496 View in PubMed
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Acceptability of reminder letters for Papanicolaou tests: a survey of women from 23 Family Health Networks in Ontario.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature160995
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2007 Oct;29(10):829-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2007
Author
Tina Karwalajtys
Janusz Kaczorowski
Lynne Lohfeld
Stephanie Laryea
Kelly Anderson
Stefanie Roder
Rolf J Sebaldt
Author Affiliation
Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton ON.
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Can. 2007 Oct;29(10):829-34
Date
Oct-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Female
Health Care Surveys
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Middle Aged
Ontario
Papanicolaou test
Patient compliance
Reminder Systems
Vaginal Smears
Women's health
Abstract
To explore women's perspectives on the acceptability and content of reminder letters from the family physician for Papanicolaou (Pap) test screening and the effect of reminder letters on compliance with screening recommendations.
A population-based survey was conducted in 23 Family Health Networks and Primary Care Networks participating in a demonstration project to increase the delivery of preventive services in Ontario. Questionnaires were mailed to randomly selected women aged 35 to 69 years who had received a reminder letter for a Pap test from their family physician within the previous six months. Two focus groups were conducted with a volunteer sample of respondents.
The usable response rate was 54.3% (406/748). Two-thirds (65.8%, 267/406) of women who completed the survey recalled receiving the reminder letter. Overall, 52.3% (212/405) reported having a Pap test in the past six months. Among women who recalled the reminder letter and scheduled or had a Pap test, 71.4% (125/175) reported that the letter influenced their decision to be screened. The majority of respondents (80.8%, 328/406) wanted to continue to receive reminder letters for Pap tests from their physician, and 34.5% (140/406) wanted to receive additional information about cervical screening. Focus group interviews indicated that women who have had a Pap test may still be unsure about screening recommendations, what the test detects, and the rationale for follow-up procedures.
Reminder letters in family practice were viewed as useful and influenced women's decisions to undergo Pap test screening. Women who have had a Pap test may still need additional information about the test.
PubMed ID
17915066 View in PubMed
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The acceptance of the cervical cytology screening programme in the province of British Columbia.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111163
Source
J Obstet Gynaecol Br Commonw. 1967 Aug;74(4):479-86
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1967

Access to medical care: how do women in Canada and the United States compare?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115809
Source
Prev Med. 2013 May;56(5):345-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2013
Author
Karen Buhr
Author Affiliation
Penn State Harrisburg, School of Public Affairs, Middletown, PA 17057, USA. kjb44@psu.edu
Source
Prev Med. 2013 May;56(5):345-7
Date
May-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Breast Neoplasms - prevention & control
Canada
Early Detection of Cancer - utilization
Female
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance Coverage - statistics & numerical data
Mammography - utilization
Medically Uninsured - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
United States
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - prevention & control
Vaginal Smears - utilization
Abstract
The purpose of this study is to determine if access to medical care and utilization of cancer screenings differs between women in the United States and Canada. This study examined this question by comparing women in Canada to women in the United States who have insurance coverage and those who do not.
This study used data from the 2002/03 Joint Canada United States Survey of Health and examined access to medical care and cancer screenings. A binary probit model was used to address several measures of access to medical care and cancer screening utilization.
This study finds five significant differences between insured American and Canadian women. Canadian women are better off in terms of ever having a mammogram, having a regular doctor, and having access to needed medicine, but fare worse in terms of having had a recent mammogram and having perceived unmet healthcare needs. With the exception of having recent mammograms, there is no statistical difference between uninsured and insured American women.
Although this study does not show that one group is strictly better off, it does show that there are significant differences between the two groups of women.
PubMed ID
23462478 View in PubMed
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Accuracy and false-positive rate of the cytologic diagnosis of follicular cervicitis: observations from the College of American Pathologists Pap Educational Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112651
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Jul;137(7):907-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Manon Auger
Walid Khalbuss
Ritu Nayar
Chengquan Zhao
Patricia Wasserman
Rhona Souers
Nicole Thomas
Ann T Moriarty
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, McGill University and McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B4, Canada.
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Jul;137(7):907-11
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Papanicolaou test
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Societies, Medical
United States - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Uterine Cervicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vaginal Smears - methods - standards
Abstract
Follicular cervicitis is usually easily identifiable on Papanicolaou (Pap) tests; however, historically, follicular cervicitis is reported to lead to false-positive diagnoses of epithelial cell abnormalities.
To assess participant responses in the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Pap educational program (CAP-PAP) to determine the accuracy and false-positive rate of follicular cervicitis cases. Design.-We performed a retrospective review of 4914 participant responses for gynecologic cytology challenges with the reference diagnosis of follicular cervicitis during 11 years (2000-2010) from CAP-PAP. Reference diagnosis category, false-positive rates by participant type (laboratory, cytotechnologist, pathologist), and preparation type (conventional smears, ThinPrep) were analyzed.
Of the total 4914 general category responses, 4368 (88.9%) were benign while 546 (11.1%) responses were epithelial cell abnormalities (false positives). Of benign responses, only 2026 (46.4%) were an exact match to follicular cervicitis. Adenocarcinoma and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were the most common diagnoses chosen as a false-positive interpretation (42.3% and 20.1%, respectively). Participant type was significantly associated with false-positive interpretations (laboratory: 19.2%; cytotechnologist: 11.1%; pathologist: 7.9%; P
PubMed ID
23808462 View in PubMed
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705 records – page 1 of 71.