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114 records – page 1 of 12.

Age at menarche and the risk of operative delivery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299215
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2019 Feb; 32(3):411-418
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
Feb-2019
Author
Hsu Phern Chong
J Frederik Frøen
Sylvia Richardson
Benoit Liquet
D Stephen Charnock-Jones
Gordon C S Smith
Author Affiliation
a Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology , University of Cambridge, NIHR Cambridge Comprehensive Biomedical Research Centre , Cambridge , UK.
Source
J Matern Fetal Neonatal Med. 2019 Feb; 32(3):411-418
Date
Feb-2019
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Cesarean Section - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, Obstetric - methods - statistics & numerical data
Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Male
Menarche - physiology
Norway - epidemiology
Obstetric Labor Complications - epidemiology - surgery
Obstetrical Forceps
Pregnancy
Risk factors
Term Birth
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
We sought to evaluate the impact of later menarche on the risk of operative delivery.
We studied 38,069 eligible women (first labors at term with a singleton infant in a cephalic presentation) from the Norwegian Mothers and Child Cohort Study. The main exposures were the age at menarche and the duration of the interval between menarche and the first birth.
Poisson's regression with a robust variance estimator.
Operative delivery, defined as emergency cesarean or assisted vaginal delivery (ventouse extraction or forceps).
A 5 year increase in age at menarche was associated with a reduced risk of operative delivery (risk ratio [RR] 0.84, 95%CI 0.78, 0.89; p?
PubMed ID
28958167 View in PubMed
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Anti-listerial inhibitory lactic acid bacteria isolated from commercial cold smoked salmon.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80840
Source
Food Microbiol. 2006 Jun;23(4):399-405
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2006
Author
Tomé Elisabetta
Teixeira Paula
Gibbs Paul A
Author Affiliation
Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, R. Dr. António Bernardino de Almeida, 4200-072 Porto, Portugal.
Source
Food Microbiol. 2006 Jun;23(4):399-405
Date
Jun-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Antibiosis
Colony Count, Microbial
Consumer Product Safety
Food contamination - analysis
Food Packaging - methods
Food Preservation - methods
Humans
Lactobacillus - growth & development - physiology
Listeria - growth & development
Listeria monocytogenes - growth & development
Salmon - microbiology
Seafood - microbiology
Time Factors
Vacuum
Abstract
The natural microflora of cold-smoked fish at the end of shelf-life are lactic acid bacteria (LAB). Some of these display a capacity to inhibit spoilage as well as several strains of pathogenic micro-organisms, e.g. Listeria monocytogenes which is isolated frequently from cold-smoked salmon (CSS). Eight batches of sliced vacuum-packed CSS from Norway, Scotland and Spain were collected at retail. Packs were stored at 5 degrees C and examined for chemical and microbiological characteristics, at purchase date and at expiration date. pH, water activity and salt content were similar to available data on lightly preserved fish products. There was a consistent pattern in the development of the microflora on CSS; the initial level of LAB was low on freshly produced CSS (10(2) cfu g(-1)); however, storage in vacuum packaging at refrigeration temperature was elective for LAB. At the end of the stated shelf-life these micro-organisms, represented mainly by Lactobacillus spp., attained ca.10(7) cfu g(-1) while Enterobacteriaceae counts were consistently lower (10(5) cfu g(-1)), which indicates the ability of LAB to grow and compete with few carbohydrates available and in the presence of moderate salt concentrations. L. monocytogenes was not found in any sample. Forty-one percent of LAB strains isolated exhibited inhibitory capacity against Listeria innocua, in a plate assay. A majority of the inhibitory effects were non-bacteriocinogenic, but nevertheless were very competitive cultures which may provide an additional hurdle for improved preservation by natural means.
PubMed ID
16943030 View in PubMed
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[Are decisions made by the HSAN to direct the clinical practice? Questions of principle a topic again following an obstetric case]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature58832
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Sep 29;96(39):4168-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-29-1999
Author
I. Ingemarsson
Author Affiliation
Kvinnokliniken, Universitetssjukhuset i Lund.
Source
Lakartidningen. 1999 Sep 29;96(39):4168-9
Date
Sep-29-1999
Language
Swedish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Infant mortality
Infant, Newborn
Malpractice
Obstetrics
Physician's Practice Patterns
Sweden
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical - adverse effects
PubMed ID
10544578 View in PubMed
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[Atypical course of uterine rupture during delivery]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63674
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Apr 29;164(18):2410-1
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-29-2002
Author
Ramune Kazlauskaite
Author Affiliation
Gynaekologisk/obstetrisk afdeling, Amtssygehuset Roskilde. ramune_k@yahoo.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2002 Apr 29;164(18):2410-1
Date
Apr-29-2002
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Hysterectomy
Obstetric Labor Complications - diagnosis
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - diagnosis
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis
Uterine Hemorrhage - diagnosis - surgery
Uterine Rupture - diagnosis - surgery
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical
Abstract
Uterine rupture is a rare complication of pregnancy, occurring in 0.03% of deliveries in Denmark. This paper describes a case of asymptomatic uterine rupture in a 38-year-old woman. She was admitted with a history of excessive vaginal bleeding 14 days after a spontaneous delivery with the use of vacuum extraction. At the time of laparotomy, a complete uterine rupture was discovered and total hysterectomy was performed.
PubMed ID
12024847 View in PubMed
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Birth by vacuum extraction delivery and school performance at 16 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106238
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Apr;210(4):361.e1-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Mia Ahlberg
Cecilia Ekéus
Anders Hjern
Author Affiliation
Division of Reproductive Health, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. Electronic address: mia.ahlberg@ki.se.
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Apr;210(4):361.e1-8
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Delivery, obstetric - statistics & numerical data
Educational Measurement
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Income
Infant, Newborn
Linear Models
Male
Maternal Age
Pregnancy
Registries
Sweden - epidemiology
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
The aim of the present study was to investigate cognitive competence, as indicated by school performance, at 16 years of age, in children delivered by vacuum extraction.
This was a register study of a national cohort of 126,032 16 year olds born as singletons, with a vertex presentation, at a gestational age of 34 weeks or older, with Swedish-born parents, delivered between 1990 and 1993 without major congenital malformations. Linear regression was used to analyze mode of delivery in relation to mean scores from national tests in mathematics (40.2; scale, 10-75; SD, 14.9) and mean average grades (223.8; scale, 10-320; SD, 52.3), with adjustment for perinatal and sociodemographic confounders.
Children delivered by vacuum extraction (-0.51; 95% confidence interval [CI], -0.76 to 0.26) as well as by nonplanned cesarean section (-0.51; 95% CI, -0.82 to -0.20) had slightly lower mean mathematics test scores than children born vaginally without instruments, after adjustment for major confounders. Mean average grades in children delivered by vacuum extraction were -1.05 (95% CI, -1.87 to -0.23) and -1.20 (95% CI,-2.24 to -0.16) in children delivered by nonplanned cesarean section compared with children born vaginally.
Children delivered by vacuum extraction had slightly lower grades at age 16 years compared with those born by noninstrumental vaginal delivery but very similar to those delivered by nonplanned cesarean. This suggests that vacuum extraction and nonplanned cesarean are equivalent alternatives for terminating deliveries with respect to cognitive outcomes.
PubMed ID
24215854 View in PubMed
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Birth outcomes and pregnancy complications in women with a history of anorexia nervosa.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81513
Source
BJOG. 2006 Aug;113(8):925-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Ekéus C.
Lindberg L.
Lindblad F.
Hjern A.
Author Affiliation
Division of Reproductive and Perinatal Health, Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. cecilia.ekeus@ki.se
Source
BJOG. 2006 Aug;113(8):925-9
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anorexia Nervosa - epidemiology
Apgar score
Birth weight
Cohort Studies
Female
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Infant, Small for Gestational Age
Middle Aged
Pre-Eclampsia - epidemiology
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications - epidemiology
Pregnancy Outcome - epidemiology
Prospective Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine birth outcomes and pregnancy complications in women with a history of anorexia nervosa. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Nationwide study in Sweden. POPULATION: All primiparous women--discharged from hospital with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa during 1973 to 1996--who gave birth during 1983 to 2002 (n = 1000) were compared with all non-anorexia nervosa primiparous women who gave birth during the same years (n = 827,582). METHOD: Register study with data from Medical Birth Registry and National Patient Discharge Register. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Pre-eclampsia, instrumental delivery, prematurity, small for gestational age, birthweight, Apgar score and perinatal mortality. RESULTS: Main birth outcome measures in women with a history of anorexia nervosa were very similar to the main population. The only observed differences were a slightly lower mean birthweight and lower adjusted odds ratios for instrumental delivery in the anorexia nervosa group compared with the main population. Neither severity of the disease nor a shorter recovery phase after first hospitalisation was related to pregnancy complications or birth outcomes. CONCLUSION: A history of anorexia nervosa was not associated with negative birth outcomes. Thus, special obstetric monitoring of pregnant women with history of anorexia nervosa does not seem to be warranted in a country with a satisfactory maternity surveillance.
PubMed ID
16827829 View in PubMed
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Boys born by forceps and vacuum extraction examined at 18 years of age.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature55761
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1984;63(6):549-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
1984
Author
S T Nilsen
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 1984;63(6):549-54
Date
1984
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Bradycardia - embryology
Extraction, Obstetrical
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Infant, Newborn
Intelligence
Male
Morbidity
Norway
Obstetrical Forceps
Pregnancy
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical
Abstract
An 18-year follow-up study was made of 62 males delivered by forceps and 38 by vacuum extraction in 1962-63. The obstetrical data are compared with the medical and psychological military draft board examinations. The mortality and morbidity rates were not significantly different from those of the total cohort of Norwegian conscripts, either in the forceps or in the vacuum group. Rotation of the fetal head with Kielland's forceps in midcavity extractions did not adversely affect the late results. A significantly elevated mean intelligence score was found in the forceps group, while the vacuum group did not differ from the national average.
PubMed ID
6507056 View in PubMed
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[Can deliveries at risk be selected at smaller delivery units?]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64225
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 20;118(8):1218-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-20-1998
Author
J. Holt
I N Vold
Author Affiliation
Barneavdelingen, Nordland Sentralsykehus, Bodø.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 1998 Mar 20;118(8):1218-20
Date
Mar-20-1998
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Birthing Centers - standards - statistics & numerical data
Cesarean Section
Delivery Rooms - standards - statistics & numerical data
Delivery, Obstetric
English Abstract
Female
Humans
Norway
Obstetric Labor Complications - diagnosis - surgery - therapy
Parity
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, High-Risk
Puerperal Disorders - diagnosis
Vacuum Extraction, Obstetrical
Abstract
In order to explore the possibility of converting a delivery unit at a small hospital to a maternity home, we examined the medical records of those women who delivered by Caesarean section, forceps or vacuum extraction at Lofoten hospital during 1995. How many of these women might it have been necessary to transfer to an obstetrical department if Lofoten hospital had been a maternity home caring for low risk deliveries (primipara and multipara)? Out of a total of 271 deliveries (primiparas 98), 49 women delivered by Caesarean section (n = 35), forceps (n = 5) or vacuum extraction (n = 9). Using risk assessment, 22 women (45%) would have been selected for antenatal transfer, and 20 (41%) for intrapartum transport. For seven women no transfer would have been possible. These women would have delivered locally by vacuum extraction. Primipara versus multipara had a relative risk of 2.8 for Caesarean section or assisted vaginal delivery. It is estimated that 8-9% of the women would be selected prenatally for planned delivery at a hospital unit and that 7-8% would be transferred in labour if primiparas delivered at the maternity home. If primiparas were excluded, the proportions would be 41% and 1-2% respectively. In 1997 the delivery unit at Lofoten hospital was temporarily converted to a maternity home for a period of two years.
PubMed ID
9567699 View in PubMed
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114 records – page 1 of 12.