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517 records – page 1 of 52.

Above all, do no harm: assessing the risk of an adverse reaction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature194729
Source
West J Med. 2001 May;174(5):325-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2001
Author
K. Turcotte
P. Raina
V A Moyer
Author Affiliation
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology University of British Columbia, 4480 Oak St, L-408 Vancouver, BC, Canada V6H 1V4.
Source
West J Med. 2001 May;174(5):325-9
Date
May-2001
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
British Columbia
Case-Control Studies
Causality
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects
Evidence-Based Medicine
Female
Humans
Infant
Male
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Physician-Patient Relations
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
Research Design
Risk assessment
Sensitivity and specificity
Vaccination - adverse effects
Notes
Cites: J Pediatr. 1983 Jan;102(1):14-86848712
Cites: JAMA. 1990 Mar 23-30;263(12):1641-52308203
Cites: Am J Epidemiol. 1992 Jul 15;136(2):121-351415136
Cites: Lancet. 1998 Jan 31;351(9099):356-619652634
Cites: N Engl J Med. 1996 Feb 8;334(6):341-88538704
Cites: Dev Biol Stand. 1997;89:109-129272340
Cites: Vaccine. 1998 Jan-Feb;16(2-3):225-319607034
Cites: JAMA. 1994 Jan 5;271(1):37-417903109
PubMed ID
11342510 View in PubMed
Less detail

Acellular pertussis vaccines: what lies ahead?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature59278
Source
Contemp Pediatr. 1995 Sep;12(9):25-8, 30, 32 passim
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1995
Author
B L Wiedermann
Author Affiliation
George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Washington, DC., USA.
Source
Contemp Pediatr. 1995 Sep;12(9):25-8, 30, 32 passim
Date
Sep-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bordetella pertussis - pathogenicity
Clinical Trials
Drug Approval
Humans
Infant
Pertussis Vaccine - adverse effects - classification - immunology
Sweden
United States
Whooping Cough - diagnosis - microbiology - prevention & control
Abstract
A safe acellular pertussis vaccine may be in your patients' future. Here's the latest on how this vaccine's effectiveness and side effects compare with those of its whole cell counterpart.
PubMed ID
10155576 View in PubMed
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[A comparative study of live and inactivated influenza vaccines: the organization of the observation and the results of a study of their reactogenicity and immunogenicity].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature218231
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1994 May-Jun;39(3):129-31
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Slepushkin
L G Rudenko
A P Kendal
A S Monto
A L Beliaev
E I Burtseva
E P Grigor'eva
N P Obrosova-Serova
V T Ivanova
V E Bragina
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1994 May-Jun;39(3):129-31
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Antibody Specificity
Child
Drug Evaluation
Humans
Influenza A virus - immunology
Influenza B virus - immunology
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
Russia
Urban Population
Vaccines, Attenuated - adverse effects - immunology
Vaccines, Combined - adverse effects - immunology
Vaccines, Inactivated - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
Schoolchildren of 30 to 34 schools of Novgorod were vaccinated over a three-year period with Russian live cold-adapted attenuated vaccine for children and whole-virus inactivated vaccines and placebo for comparative field study of the vaccines properties and efficacy. In control trials both bi- and trivalent live attenuated vaccines were well tolerated and areactogenic. A whole-virus inactivated trivalent vaccine induced mild and moderate fever and local reactions in 2-4% of the vaccinees. Special observations are necessary to establish the possibility of use and to determine a dose of this inactivated vaccine for immunization of children, especially those of 7-10 years of age. All the vaccines induced HI antibody production in 50-80% and antineuraminidase in 50-70% of seronegative children. The pattern of the results was similar to that in revaccinated children with preexisting antibody at a level of 1:20, but much lower in children with the initial titre above 1:20. After the 3rd year of vaccination the immune response of the vaccinees was similar, most of the results depending on the initial antibody titre and also on the change of vaccine strains. This raises a question of the expediency of annual influenza revaccination of the same person after 2 years of successful immunization and of the necessity of vaccine strains replacement after 2-3 years of use.
PubMed ID
8091754 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A comparative study of the inoculation properties of live recombinant and inactivated influenza vaccines made from strain A/Philippines/2/82 (H3N2) in 8- to 15-year-old children].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature225785
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1991 Sep-Oct;36(5):372-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
A N Slepushkin
N P Obrosova-Serova
E I Burtseva
E A Govorkova
L G Rudenko
R V Vartanian
A I Vereshchinskii
M D Musina
N I Lonskaia
L A Zazimko
Source
Vopr Virusol. 1991 Sep-Oct;36(5):372-4
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Humans
Influenza Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - prevention & control
International Cooperation
Moscow
Orthomyxoviridae - immunology
United States
Vaccines, Inactivated - adverse effects - immunology
Vaccines, Synthetic - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
This study was carried out to compare reactogenicity, immunogenicity, and efficacy of live attenuated and inactivated influenza vaccines prepared from influenza A/Philippines/2/82-like virus strains. Schoolchildren of a boarding school of Moscow were randomly divided into three groups: (1) vaccinated with a live attenuated vaccine, (2) vaccinated with inactivated influenza vaccine, and (3) given placebo. Both vaccines were well tolerated by the children, with practically no severe general or local reactions. The inactivated vaccine was found to be superior to the live one in its capacity to stimulate humoral immunity studied by HI, EIA, and microneutralization tests. In 69.7% of the children given the inactivated vaccine, seroconversion to the vaccine strain was detected by two or three methods of antibody titration used. Only 35.4% seroconversions were demonstrated in children immunized with the live influenza vaccine. Enzyme immunoassay was found to be a more sensitive but less specific method for antibody titration as compared with HI test whereas microneutralization proved to be more specific but less sensitive for titration of antibodies to influenza A (H3N2) viruses.
PubMed ID
1803766 View in PubMed
Less detail

Active hospital-based surveillance for meningococcal polysaccharide vaccine adverse events after an emergency mass immunization program, Edmonton, Alberta.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature174388
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2005 Jun 1;31(11):126-30
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1-2005

[A cultured concentrated inactivated vaccine against tick-borne encephalitis studied during the immunization of children and adolescents].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198043
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Nov-Dec;(6):50-3
Publication Type
Article
Author
L I Pavlova
M A Gorbunov
M S Vorob'eva
A S Karavanov
V P Grachev
I P Ladyshenskaia
M N Rasshchepkina
L N Mel'nikova
T M Lebedeva
N A Mel'nikov
A G Gusmanova
M Iu Deviatkov
E V Rozanova
M A Mukachev
Author Affiliation
Tarasevich State Research Institute for Standardization and Control of Medical Biological Preparations, Moscow, Russia.
Source
Zh Mikrobiol Epidemiol Immunobiol. 1999 Nov-Dec;(6):50-3
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Analysis of Variance
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Austria
Child
Encephalitis Viruses, Tick-Borne - immunology
Encephalitis, Tick-Borne - prevention & control
Humans
Immunization - methods - statistics & numerical data
Immunization, Secondary - methods - statistics & numerical data
Russia
Time Factors
Vaccines, Inactivated - adverse effects - immunology
Viral Vaccines - adverse effects - immunology
Abstract
The word deals with the results obtained in the study of the reactogenicity and immunological activity of concentrated and inactivated tissue-culture tick-borne encephalitis vaccine, manufactured by the Chumakov Institute of Poliomyelitis and Viral Encephalitides, in the immunization of children and adolescents. The vaccine proved to be moderately reactogenic and exhibited pronounced immunological activity. In 91.5% of the immunized children the fourfold increase of the antibody level was observed. On the basis of the data obtained in this study the tick-borne encephalitis vaccine was recommended for use in medical practice for the prophylaxis of tick-borne encephalitis among children and adolescents.
PubMed ID
10876850 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Advantages and disadvantages of inactivated and live influenza vaccine].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature178960
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2004 Jul-Aug;49(4):4-12
Publication Type
Article
Author
Iu Z Gendon
Source
Vopr Virusol. 2004 Jul-Aug;49(4):4-12
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Allergens - immunology
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Child
Clinical Trials as Topic
Egg Proteins - immunology
Humans
Hypersensitivity - etiology
Immunity, Mucosal
Immunization Schedule
Influenza Vaccines - administration & dosage - adverse effects - immunology
Influenza, Human - epidemiology - prevention & control
Russia - epidemiology
Vaccination - adverse effects
Vaccines, Attenuated - administration & dosage
Vaccines, Inactivated - administration & dosage
Abstract
Published data related with comparison studies of safety, efficiency and some other properties of cold-adapted live influenza vaccine (LIV) and of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) are analyzed. LIV and IIV do not differ by systemic reactions after administration; however, it is not ruled out that there can be unfavorable reactions in vaccination of persons with allergy to the chicken-embryo proteins as well as in cases of persistence/reversion of cold-adapted strain observed in vaccination of persons with primary impairments of the immune system. There are no convincing data, up to now, on that LIV is superior to IIV in coping with influenza pandemics. The efficiency of LIV and IIV for children aged 3 years and more and for healthy adults is virtually identical. Additional controllable field comparative studies of LIV and IIV efficiency in immunization of elderly persons are needed. Limited data on LIV efficiency for children aged 2 months and more were obtained. The need in a 2-stage vaccination of all age group with the aim of ensuring responses to all 3 LIV components is, certainly, a LIV disadvantage. In case of IIV, the 2-stage vaccination is needed only for persons who were not ill with influenza. The intranasal LIV administration has, from the practical and psychological standpoints, an advantage before the IIV administration by syringe. The ability of LIV to protect from the drift influenza-virus variations could be its advantage before IIV; still, more research is needed to verify it. Transplantable cell lines meeting the WHO requirements could be an optimal substrate for the production of LIV and IIV. Children are the optimal age group for influenza prevention by cold-adapted LIV, whereas, IIV fits better for vaccination of adults and elderly persons.
PubMed ID
15293504 View in PubMed
Less detail
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Oct 5;126(19):2541-4
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-5-2006
Author
Nøkleby Hanne
Bergsaker Marianne A Riise
Author Affiliation
Divisjon for smittevern, Nasjonalt folkehelseinstitutt, Oslo, Norway. hano@fhi.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Oct 5;126(19):2541-4
Date
Oct-5-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Bacterial Vaccines - adverse effects
Child
Humans
Immunization Programs
Norway
Registries
Risk factors
United States
Vaccination - adverse effects
Viral Vaccines - adverse effects
Abstract
When the diseases we try to prevent through vaccination are rare, we tend to focus more on the associated risks. Vaccination has led to unfortunate consequences, mainly due to production failure and inadequate control in earlier years. The requirements for vaccine control are now so rigorous that the risk for such occurrences is close to zero. Local and mild systemic reactions to vaccines are rather common, and are usually well known and described in detail when a vaccine is licensed. Some vaccine reactions are however so rare that they only will be discovered through surveillance after the vaccine has become available for routine use. Suspicion of adverse events will now normally arise through the official notification systems for adverse events. Large epidemiological studies are often necessary to decide whether there is a causal relationship or only a coincidence. Recording of adverse events following vaccination and transparency about their existence, are important issues in the work to maintain the credibility of vaccines.
PubMed ID
17028637 View in PubMed
Less detail

Adverse events after vaccination with dTap in high school students who have previously been vaccinated with d2T5.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169506
Source
Can Commun Dis Rep. 2006 Feb 1;32(3):25-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-1-2006

517 records – page 1 of 52.