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235 records – page 1 of 24.

Adverse reactions from consumption of oral rabies vaccine baits in dogs in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature279089
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2016 Sep 15;58(1):53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-15-2016
Author
Tiina Nokireki
Martti Nevalainen
Liisa Sihvonen
Tuija Gadd
Source
Acta Vet Scand. 2016 Sep 15;58(1):53
Date
Sep-15-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Behavior, Animal - drug effects
Dog Diseases - etiology - pathology
Dogs
Finland
Gastrointestinal Diseases - etiology - veterinary
Rabies Vaccines - adverse effects - pharmacology
Vaccination - adverse effects - veterinary
Abstract
Oral rabies vaccination of wildlife has effectively reduced the incidence of rabies in wildlife and has led to the elimination of rabies in large areas of Europe. The safety of oral rabies vaccines has been assessed in both target (red fox and raccoon dog) and several non-target species.
Since 2011, the competent authority in Finland has received a few reports of dogs experiencing adverse reactions that have been assumed to be caused by the consumption of baits containing oral rabies vaccine. The dogs usually exhibited gastrointestinal symptoms (vomiting, inappetence, constipation or diarrhoea) or behavioral symptoms (restlessness, listlessness and unwillingness to continue hunting).
Nevertheless, these adverse reactions are transient and non-life threatening. Even though the adverse reactions are unpleasant to individual dogs and their owners, the benefits of oral rabies vaccination clearly outweigh the risks.
PubMed ID
27633386 View in PubMed
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An increased frequency of chromosomal changes and SCE's in cultured blood lymphocytes of 12 subjects vaccinated against smallpox.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature248856
Source
Hum Genet. 1978 Feb 23;41(1):89-96
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-23-1978
Author
S. Knuutila
J. Mäki-Paakkanen
M. Kähkönen
E. Hokkanen
Source
Hum Genet. 1978 Feb 23;41(1):89-96
Date
Feb-23-1978
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aneuploidy
Cells, Cultured
Chromatids
Chromosome Aberrations
Female
Finland
Humans
Lymphocytes - ultrastructure
Smallpox - genetics - prevention & control
Time Factors
Vaccination
Abstract
An increased frequency of chromosomal changes and sister chromatid exchanges was detected in 10 women 7 days after smallpox vaccination.
PubMed ID
631863 View in PubMed
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Anticipated acceptance of HPV vaccination at the baseline of implementation: a survey of parental and adolescent knowledge and attitudes in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature164024
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2007 May;40(5):466-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2007
Author
Sarah C Woodhall
Matti Lehtinen
Tiina Verho
Heini Huhtala
Mari Hokkanen
Elise Kosunen
Author Affiliation
University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland.
Source
J Adolesc Health. 2007 May;40(5):466-9
Date
May-2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Female
Finland
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Logistic Models
Male
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines - administration & dosage
Parental Consent - statistics & numerical data
Patient Acceptance of Health Care - statistics & numerical data
Probability
Questionnaires
Risk assessment
Vaccination - standards - trends
Abstract
We evaluated acceptance of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination by adolescents and their parents, 83% and 86% of whom accepted vaccination. Improving knowledge and awareness of HPV, and addressing parental concerns about vaccinating adolescents, most notably on vaccinating against a sexually transmitted disease, should help tackle factors associated with being resistant to accepting HPV vaccination.
PubMed ID
17448408 View in PubMed
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Antigenic and molecular properties of type 3 poliovirus responsible for an outbreak of poliomyelitis in a vaccinated population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature57846
Source
J Gen Virol. 1986 May;67 ( Pt 5):899-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-1986
Author
D I Magrath
D M Evans
M. Ferguson
G C Schild
P D Minor
F. Horaud
R. Crainic
M. Stenvik
T. Hovi
Source
J Gen Virol. 1986 May;67 ( Pt 5):899-905
Date
May-1986
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Amino Acid Sequence
Antigens, Viral - genetics
Base Sequence
Feces - microbiology
Finland
Humans
Norway
Oligoribonucleotides - analysis
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - immunology
Polioviruses - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
RNA, Viral - isolation & purification
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Ribonuclease T1
Sweden
Vaccination
Abstract
Virus isolated from an outbreak of poliomyelitis in Finland has been examined serologically and at the molecular level. The causative agent was an antigenically unusual strain of type 3 poliovirus, which was unrelated to the strains used to manufacture either live or killed poliovaccines. It is likely that the antigenic properties of the virus played a part in establishing a limited outbreak of poliomyelitis in a vaccinated population.
PubMed ID
3009690 View in PubMed
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Antipolio prophylaxis of immunocompromised children during a nationwide oral poliovaccine campaign.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature234440
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1987 Dec;6(12):1106-10
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1987
Author
M. Stenvik
L. Hovi
M A Siimes
M. Roivainen
T. Hovi
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland.
Source
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 1987 Dec;6(12):1106-10
Date
Dec-1987
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Antibodies, Viral - biosynthesis
Child
Child, Preschool
Disease Outbreaks - prevention & control
Female
Finland
Humans
Immune Tolerance
Leukemia - immunology
Male
Poliomyelitis - epidemiology - prevention & control
Poliovirus - immunology - isolation & purification
Poliovirus Vaccine, Inactivated - pharmacology
Poliovirus Vaccine, Oral - pharmacology
Vaccines, Attenuated - pharmacology
Abstract
A nationwide vaccination campaign with oral poliovirus vaccine was organized in Finland in 1985 to halt an outbreak of poliomyelitis. Immunocompromised persons and their household contacts were excluded from the oral poliovirus vaccine target group and given instead a dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine. This gave us an opportunity to determine whether immunocompromised persons are protected from poliomyelitis during an outbreak and oral poliovirus campaign. Fourteen children, ages 3 to 17 years, with leukemia were given a booster dose of a novel high antigen content, trivalent inactivated poliovirus vaccine. All but two responded by an at least 4-fold increase in serum-neutralizing antibodies to at least one poliovirus serotype. These results indicate that children with acute lymphocytic leukemia in remission respond well to a booster dose of inactivated poliovirus vaccine. Antibody concentrations to the uncommon local epidemic strain of type 3 poliovirus remained, however, relatively low in most patients (median, 1:6) suggesting relatively impaired heterologous response to vaccination. Possible spread of live vaccine viruses to the inactivated poliovirus-vaccinated children and their close contacts was evaluated by examining weekly fecal specimens from 20 children and their 19 regular adult contacts for cytopathic viruses. No polioviruses were isolated from 224 specimens examined, indicating that this high risk population was well-protected from unintended exposure to live polioviruses.
PubMed ID
2829105 View in PubMed
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Assessment of the knowledge and beliefs of Finnish medical students regarding HIV infection and participation in AIDS vaccine trials.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature161996
Source
Int Q Community Health Educ. 2005-2006;24(2):123-34
Publication Type
Article
Author
Olanrewaju O Onigbogi
Jussi Kauhanen
Erkki J Miettola
Author Affiliation
University College Hospital, Ibadan, Nigeria. lanreonigbogi@yahoo.com
Source
Int Q Community Health Educ. 2005-2006;24(2):123-34
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
AIDS Vaccines
Adult
Attitude of Health Personnel
Awareness
Clinical Trials as Topic
Curriculum
Data Collection
Female
Finland
HIV Infections - prevention & control
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Patient Selection
Questionnaires
Students, Medical - psychology
Abstract
This study sought to determine the level of general knowledge about HIV infection among Finnish medical students and their willingness to participate in AIDS vaccine trials. One hundred and sixty-two volunteer medical students at the University of Kuopio in the 2nd and 5th years of training filled self-administered questionnaires. The overall response rate among the 2nd year students was 77%, and among the 5th year students 70%. Knowledge was scored on a percentage scale. The mean score on general knowledge about HIV among 2nd year students was 75.6 (SD=0.23) while in the 5th year it was 87.8 (SD 0.18). Fifty-four students (77%) from the 5th year and 66 (72%) from the 2nd year indicated their willingness to participate (WTP) in AIDS vaccine trials (p=0.09). Medical curricula should be constantly revised to keep medical students up-to-date about recent advances in HIV/AIDS research.
PubMed ID
17686682 View in PubMed
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Association of pesticide exposure, vaccination response, and interleukin-1 gene polymorphisms.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature153968
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):709-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2008
Author
M. Baranska
L. Van Amelsvoort
S. Birindelli
S. Fustinoni
E. Corsini
J. Liesivuori
H. Van Loveren
Author Affiliation
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz, Poland.
Source
Hum Exp Toxicol. 2008 Sep;27(9):709-13
Date
Sep-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alleles
Bulgaria
Cross-Sectional Studies
Finland
Gene Frequency
Genotype
Hepatitis B Vaccines - immunology
Humans
Immune System - drug effects - immunology - physiopathology
Immunity - drug effects - immunology
Interleukin 1 Receptor Antagonist Protein - genetics
Interleukin-1 - genetics
Interleukin-1alpha - genetics
Interleukin-1beta - genetics
Italy
Netherlands
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - analysis - prevention & control
Pesticides - poisoning
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Polymorphism, Genetic
Risk assessment
Vaccination
Abstract
We performed a cross-sectional study involving workers from four European countries in which exposure to pesticides and immune parameters were evaluated over a short period of time. The total study population consisted of 238 workers occupationally exposed to pesticides and 198 nonoccupationally exposed workers. The study showed that pesticide exposure at levels encountered by workers under different conditions in Europe did not affect the ability of the immune system to respond to vaccination. We could, however, identify individuals within the group of pesticide exposed workers who were genetically characterized by the 2.2 IL-1alpha polymorphism and who showed a lower antibody response, pointing out the importance of the understanding of genetic variability and the interaction between genetic and environmental factors in the identification of high-risk individuals, which may eventually lead to preventive measures.
PubMed ID
19042953 View in PubMed
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At what age should we be vaccinating for human papillomavirus?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139536
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2010;70(4):233-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2010
Author
Jorma Paavonen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Helsinki, Finland. jorma.paavonen @ hus.fi
Source
Gynecol Obstet Invest. 2010;70(4):233-6
Date
2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - virology
Condylomata Acuminata - prevention & control - virology
Female
Finland
Health Plan Implementation
Human papillomavirus 11
Humans
Male
Mass Vaccination - methods
Papillomavirus Infections - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control - virology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause high disease burden. Primary prevention by vaccination is a major breakthrough. HPV vaccines are well tolerated and safe. Vaccines protect unexposed individuals against high-grade CIN and VIN/VaIN caused by the vaccine HPV types. Vaccines also provide protection against related oncogenic HPV types. The primary target population is young adolescents before their sexual debut. Catch-up vaccination policy up to age 26 may facilitate long-term health benefits but should not divert resources from vaccinating the primary target population or from effective cervical cancer screening programmes. Health benefits of vaccinating older age groups beyond age 26 are unknown.
PubMed ID
21051841 View in PubMed
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235 records – page 1 of 24.