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Awareness of human papillomavirus in a cohort of nearly 70,000 women from four Nordic countries.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92225
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(10):1048-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
2008
Author
Nøhr Bugge
Munk Christian
Tryggvadottir Laufey
Sparén Par
Tran Trung N
Nygård Mari
Skare Gry B
Dasbach Erik
Liaw Kai L
Kjaer Susanne K
Author Affiliation
Department of Virus, Hormones and Cancer, Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2008;87(10):1048-54
Date
2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Educational Status
Female
Humans
Knowledge
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Papillomaviridae
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - psychology
Questionnaires
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Tumor Virus Infections - virology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - virology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the fraction of women who have heard of human papillomavirus (HPV) in four Nordic countries (Denmark, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden) and to study the correlates of this awareness, just before the vaccines were released. DESIGN: Population-based cross-sectional study by means of a questionnaire. Setting. Denmark 2004-2005. Population. A total of 69,147 women participated (participation rate of 65%) in the study. METHODS: A random sample of women from the general female population (18-45 years) in Denmark, Iceland, Norway, and Sweden were invited to answer a self-administered questionnaire regarding HPV and lifestyle habits. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Having heard of HPV. RESULTS: Overall, a total of 32.6% had ever heard about HPV. Respectively, only 25.1% of Danish women, 33.0% Norwegian women, 32.5% Swedish women, and 41.0% Icelandic women had heard about HPV. The most important correlates associated with ever having heard of HPV were a history of genital warts (odds ratios, OR=2.57; 99% confidence intervals, CI: 2.38-2.76) and educational level (OR=2.06; 99% CI: 1.92-2.21). Other correlates associated with awareness of HPV were being single during pregnancy, never having been pregnant, former use of hormonal contraceptives and condom use. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that at least two-thirds of Nordic women have never heard of HPV. These data are important for developing and evaluating strategies to inform and educate the population about HPV infection and disease.
PubMed ID
18763170 View in PubMed
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Cervical HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in immunosuppressed Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature295734
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 02; 97(2):142-150
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
02-2018
Author
Mette T Roensbo
Jan Blaakaer
Karin Skov
Anne Hammer
Author Affiliation
Department of Clinical Medicine, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2018 02; 97(2):142-150
Date
02-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Bone Marrow Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Denmark
Female
Genotype
Humans
Kidney Transplantation - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - genetics - isolation & purification
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - virology
Abstract
Women receiving immunosuppressive treatment due to organ transplantation are at increased risk of Human papilloma virus (HPV)-related diseases, including cervical neoplasia. This pilot study aimed to describe the cervical HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in immunosuppressed Danish women.
We included women who underwent renal (RTR) or bone marrow transplantation (BMTR) in 2009-2012 or 2014 at Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Women undergoing transplantation in 2009-2012 had one cervical cytology performed, whereas women undergoing transplantation in 2014 had three, one before and two after transplantation. The samples were examined for cytological abnormalities and tested for HPV using Cobas® HPV Test and CLART® HPV2 Test.
Of 94 eligible cases we included 60 RTR and BMTR. The overall prevalence of high-risk HPV was 15.0 [95% confidence interval (CI) 7.1-26.6] and the prevalence was higher among BMTR (29.4; 95% CI 10.3-56.0) than RTR (9.3%, 95% CI 2.6-22.1), although this was not statistically significant (p = 0.10). The distribution of high-risk HPV was broad, with HPV 45 as the most common genotype (3.3%). The prevalences of high-risk HPV types included in the bivalent/quadrivalent and the nonavalent vaccines were 1.7 and 8.3%, respectively. The prevalence of low-grade and high-grade cytological abnormalities was 6.7 and 5.0%, respectively.
Immunosuppressed women were infected with a broad range of high-risk HPV genotypes and the prevalence of cytological abnormalities was higher than found in previous studies of the general population. The nonavalent HPV vaccine will offer immunosuppressed individuals a greater protection against HPV-related diseases compared with the bivalent/quadrivalent HPV vaccines.
PubMed ID
29156081 View in PubMed
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Consistent high viral load of human papillomavirus 16 and risk of cervical carcinoma in situ: a nested case-control study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20375
Source
Lancet. 2000 Jun 24;355(9222):2194-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-24-2000
Author
N. Ylitalo
P. Sørensen
A M Josefsson
P K Magnusson
P K Andersen
J. Pontén
H O Adami
U B Gyllensten
M. Melbye
Author Affiliation
Department of Medical Epidemiology, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden. nathalie.ylitalo@mep.ki.se
Source
Lancet. 2000 Jun 24;355(9222):2194-8
Date
Jun-24-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Actins - analysis
Adult
Carcinoma in Situ - virology
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Confidence Intervals
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Longitudinal Studies
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Papillomavirus, Human - classification - genetics
Papovaviridae Infections - classification
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Sweden
Tumor Virus Infections - classification
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - virology
Vaginal Smears
Viral Load
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Persistent infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is believed to be a prerequisite for the development of cervical neoplasia. Persistence may depend on certain characteristics, such as viral load, which has so far been given little attention. We investigated the association between HPV 16 viral load and cervical carcinoma in situ. METHODS: We did a nested case-control study of women participating in cytological screening in Sweden. We used a sensitive quantitative PCR assay to estimate HPV 16 load in multiple smears for each woman, taken during a period of up to 26 years before diagnosis. We calculated C, values, which decrease as the number of viral DNA copies increases. FINDINGS: 2081 smears from 478 cases and 1754 smears from 608 controls were tested. Among cases, we found a consistently increased load of HPV 16 already 13 years or more before diagnosis, and when many smears were still cytologically normal. Women with high HPV 16 viral loads were at least 30 times the relative risk of HPV-16-negative women more than a decade before diagnosis. The increase in relative risk was constant over time. About 25% of women (95% CI 0.12-0.32) infected with a high viral load before age 25 years developed cervical carcinoma in situ within 15 years. INTERPRETATION: Cervical carcinoma in situ associated with HPV 16 occurs mainly in HPV-16-positive women who have consistently high viral loads long term. Women at high risk could be identified by use of a quantitative HPV test in addition to cytological screening.
Notes
Comment In: ACP J Club. 2001 Jan-Feb;134(1):35
Comment In: Lancet. 2000 Jun 24;355(9222):2179-8010881885
PubMed ID
10881892 View in PubMed
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[Detection and typing of human papilloma virus by polymerase chain reaction and hybridization assay in cervical samples with cytological abnormalities].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature155711
Source
Mikrobiyol Bul. 2008 Apr;42(2):273-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Koray Ergünay
Müge Misirlioglu
Pinar Firat
Z Selçuk Tuncer
Serdar Tuncer
Isil Yildiz
Semsettin Ustaçelebi
Author Affiliation
Hacettepe Universitesi Top Fakültesi, Mikrobiyoloji ve Klinik Mikrobiyoloji Anabilim Dali, Ankara. ekoray@hacettepe.edu.tr
Source
Mikrobiyol Bul. 2008 Apr;42(2):273-82
Date
Apr-2008
Language
Turkish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - virology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - virology
Cervix Uteri - pathology - virology
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Nucleic Acid Hybridization
Papillomaviridae - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Uterine Cervical Dysplasia - virology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - virology
Abstract
Certain mucosa-tropic human papillomavirus (HPV) types are associated with carcinoma of the uterine cervix or its precursor lesions. In addition to cytological screening, early diagnosis and treatment of cervical carcinoma rely on sensitive detection and typing of HPV isolates. In this study, HPV detection and typing were performed in the cervical samples of patients with abnormal cytological evaluation. Forty randomly-selected cervical samples that comprise 18 ASC-US (Aypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance), four AG-US (Aypical Glandular cells of Undetermined Significance), one ASC-H (Atypical Squamous Cells-can not exclude HSIL), one HSIL (High-grade Intraepithelial Lesion), 14 LSIL (Low-grade Intraepithelial Lesion), one adenocarcinoma and one squamous cell carcinoma, obtained by a commercial liquid-based cytology system (ThinPrep Pap Smear Method, Cytyc, USA), were included to the study. HPV-DNA detection were accomplished by L1 in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR) performed using MY09/11 and GP5/6 primers along with a commercial real-time PCR (HeliosisTM HPV LC PCR Kit; Metis Biotechnology, Turkey) that detects HPV infections and HPV-16 via melting curve analysis. A commercial PCR-array hybridization test (Rapid HPV Genotyping MacroArray; HybriBio Inc, Hong Kong) that can identify 21 low and high risk HPV types was employed for typing. Viral DNA was detected in 35% (14/40) and 57.5% (23/40) of the samples by MY09/11 and GP5/6 primers, respectively. All in-house PCR positive samples were also positive in the real-time PCR assay. PCR-array hybridization assay provided typing results in 95.6% (22/23) of the PCR positive samples while one LSIL sample could not be typed by any of the methods used. High risk HPV types 16, 18, 31, 45, 52, 56, 58, 59,68 (65.8%); probable high risk type 53 (13.2%), low risk types 6, 42 and 81 (21%) were identified out of a total of 38 HPV isolates. Multiple infections with more than one HPV type were identified in 45.5% (10/22) of positive samples. High/probable high risk types were detected in all single infections and all low risk isolates were present in multiple infections. HPV-16 was identified in 31.8% (7/22) by real-time PCR and in 45.5% (10/23) of positive samples by PCR-array hybridization assay. HPV-16 was observed to be the most frequently detected type (10/22, 45.5%), followed by types 53 and 81 (5/22, 22.7%); 68 (4/22, 18.2%); type 58 (3/22; 13.6%); types 31, 42 and 59 (2/22; 9.1%) and others (1/22, 4.5%). As a result our data have indicated the abundance of high risk HPV isolates and infections with multiple HPV types in that specific area.
PubMed ID
18697425 View in PubMed
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Evaluation of antibody response to human papillomavirus early proteins in women in whom cervical cancer developed 1 to 20 years later.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature18666
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Jan;188(1):49-55
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2003
Author
Matti Lehtinen
Michael Pawlita
Klaus Zumbach
Katherine Lie
Matti Hakama
Egil Jellum
Pentti Koskela
Tapio Luostarinen
Jorma Paavonen
Eero Pukkala
Eva Sigstad
Steinar Thoresen
Joakim Dillner
Author Affiliation
Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Microbiology, National Public Health Institute, Helsinki, Finland. llmale@uta.fi
Source
Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2003 Jan;188(1):49-55
Date
Jan-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - virology
DNA, Viral - analysis
DNA-Binding Proteins
Female
Finland
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Norway
Oncogene Proteins, Viral - immunology
Papillomavirus, Human - genetics - immunology
Repressor Proteins
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sweden
Time Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - virology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: Infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is the most important cause of cervical cancer worldwide. After infection there is a long latency period of at least 10 to 15 years during which cervical cancer develops in a small proportion of originally infected women. Up to 50% of these women have at diagnosis antibodies to the HPV oncoproteins E6 and E7, which are rarely found among healthy women. Our purpose was to evaluate whether antibodies to HPV16 and HPV18 E6 and E7 proteins are useful for early diagnosis of cervical cancer by measuring the antibody response in women in whom cervical cancer later developed. STUDY DESIGN: A joint serum bank of 550,000 Swedish, Norwegian, and Finnish women was followed up for 0.5 to 20 years, after which 178 invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC) cases, 150 of whom had squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 527 controls were identified. Antibodies to HPV16 and HPV18 E6 and E7 proteins were determined by tag enzyme-linked immunoassays. RESULTS: HPV16/18 E6 and E7 antibodies were detected infrequently (7.0%) in women in whom SCC later developed and yielded a moderately increased estimate of associated relative risk (odds ratio 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.4). Sensitivity of the combined antibody tests for the detection of occult SCC varied between 6% and 14% but was not related to time lag between serum sampling and cancer diagnosis. CONCLUSION: HPV16/18 E6 and E7 antibody responses are not sensitive markers of occult cervical cancer.
PubMed ID
12548195 View in PubMed
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High frequency of multiple HPV types in cervical specimens from Danish women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature89905
Source
APMIS. 2009 Feb;117(2):108-14
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2009
Author
Mejlhede Nina
Bonde Jesper
Fomsgaard Anders
Author Affiliation
Department of Virology, Statens Serum Institut, Artillerivej 5, Copenhagen, Denmark. nam@ssi.dk
Source
APMIS. 2009 Feb;117(2):108-14
Date
Feb-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - virology
Cervix Uteri - virology
Denmark
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis
Papillomaviridae - classification - isolation & purification
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - virology
Abstract
Genital human papillomavirus infection (HPV) is common and usually harmless. However, chronic cervical infection with high-risk HPV types can cause cell changes that may eventually lead to cancer. To determine the frequency of individual HPV types among mixed infections, we examined the type distribution among cervical specimens from more than 1000 Danish women. We also examined the HPV type distribution and the frequency of single and multiple HPV types for specimens from 113 women who underwent conization and were diagnosed with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II or worse (CIN2+). Using microarray technology, we found that 49% of the HPV-positive patients were infected with multiple HPV types. Among the CIN2+ diagnosed women, this frequency was 41%. The most frequently found high-risk HPV type was HPV-16, which was found in 25% of the HPV-positive cervical specimens. Among the HPV positive CIN2+ diagnosed women, 48% were HPV-16 positive. Women younger than 30 years of age had a higher frequency of multiple infections (61%) than women older than 30 years (39%). We conclude that cervical infection with multiple HPV types is common among women in all age groups and among women with or without the diagnosis of CIN2+.
PubMed ID
19239432 View in PubMed
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HPV subtypes in cervical cancer biopsies between 1930 and 2004: detection using general primer pair PCR and sequencing.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81885
Source
Virchows Arch. 2006 Aug;449(2):141-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2006
Author
Bertelsen Bjørn Inge
Kugarajh Kalaiarasy
Skar Robert
Laerum Ole Didrik
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Haukeland University Hospital, 5021 Bergen, Norway. mgpbb@webmail.uib.no
Source
Virchows Arch. 2006 Aug;449(2):141-7
Date
Aug-2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Biopsy
DNA Primers
DNA, Viral - isolation & purification
Female
Genes, p53
Humans
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - classification - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction - methods
Time Factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - virology
Abstract
Our objective was to investigate the practicability of sequencing DNA from formalin fixed, paraffin embedded tissue stored for up to 75 years and to study human papillomavirus subtype distribution in cervical neoplasias between 1931 and 2004. Three protocols for DNA retrieval were tested, and magnetic bead DNA extraction proved advantageous, as it gave superior specimen purity and effortless sequencing. Successful sequencing was achieved in more than 70% of the specimens from 1931 to 1960. This technique was utilized in the study of papillomavirus subtypes using general primer pair PCR with sequencing of the products in a series of 97 cases of neoplastic and non-neoplastic cervical specimens from 1931 to 1960 and 73 similar cases from 1992 to 2004. HPV was detected in 61% of neoplastic specimens from 1931 to 1960, and in 89% of those from 1992 to 2004. In specimens from 1931 to 1934, only HPV type 16 was detected, whereas in the specimens from 1940 and up, other HPV subtypes were identified in one-third of the cases. The difference was significant and suggests an increase in papillomavirus subtype heterogeneity in Western Norway during 1930-2000. The results strongly support the feasibility of using DNA from paraffin-embedded specimens for studying cancer etiology and genotypes over extended time periods.
PubMed ID
16767449 View in PubMed
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Human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 E6 variants in tonsillar cancer in comparison to those in cervical cancer in Stockholm, Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature124680
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(4):e36239
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Juan Du
Cecilia Nordfors
Anders Näsman
Michal Sobkowiak
Mircea Romanitan
Tina Dalianis
Torbjörn Ramqvist
Author Affiliation
Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. juan.du@ki.se
Source
PLoS One. 2012;7(4):e36239
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - virology
Case-Control Studies
Female
Human papillomavirus 16 - classification - genetics - physiology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Oncogene Proteins, Viral - genetics
Phylogeny
Polymorphism, Genetic
Repressor Proteins - genetics
Reproducibility of Results
Sweden
Tonsillar Neoplasms - virology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - virology
Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV), especially HPV16, is associated with the development of both cervical and tonsillar cancer and intratype variants in the amino acid sequence of the HPV16 E6 oncoprotein have been demonstrated to be associated with viral persistence and cancer lesions. For this reason the presence of HPV16 E6 variants in tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) in cervical cancer (CC), as well as in cervical samples (CS), were explored.
HPV16 E6 was sequenced in 108 TSCC and 52 CC samples from patients diagnosed 2000-2008 in the County of Stockholm, and in 51 CS from young women attending a youth health center in Stockholm.
The rare E6 variant R10G was relatively frequent (19%) in TSCC, absent in CC and infrequent (4%) in CS, while the well-known L83V variant was common in TSCC (40%), CC (31%), and CS (29%). The difference for R10G was significant between TSCC and CC (p = 0.0003), as well as between TSCC and CS (p = 0.009). The HPV16 European phylogenetic lineage and its derivatives dominated in all samples (>90%).
The relatively high frequency of the R10G variant in TSCC, as compared to what has been found in CC both in the present study as well as in several other studies in different countries, may indicate a difference between TSCC and CC with regard to tumor induction and development. Alternatively, there could be differences with regard to the oral and cervical prevalence of this variant that need to be explored further.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22558401 View in PubMed
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Link between HPV and invasive cervical cancer strengthened.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20495
Source
Eur J Cancer. 2000 Feb;36(3):288
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000

[Little knowledge about human papillomavirus among young Norwegian women]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature80951
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Aug 24;126(16):2101-3
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-24-2006
Author
Øren Anita
Skjeldestad Finn Egil
Author Affiliation
Avdeling for epidemiologisk forskning SINTEF Helse 7465 Trondheim. anita.oren@sintef.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2006 Aug 24;126(16):2101-3
Date
Aug-24-2006
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Condylomata Acuminata - virology
Female
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Norway
Papillomavirus Infections - transmission
Questionnaires
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - virology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Little is documented about Norwegian women's knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV). The purpose of this study was to investigate young Norwegian women's knowledge of HPV transmission and diseases associated with the virus. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From September 1998 to December 2000, 898 women aged 16 - 24 years were recruited to a study on the natural course of HPV-infections. At the beginning of the study, 323 participants at 8 of the 16 selected health centres answered a questionnaire regarding motivation for and openness about study participation, and knowledge about transmission and diseases associated with the virus. Data were analysed with Chi-quadrate test and logistic regression in SPSS. RESULTS: Only 20 % (63/323) of the women had heard about HPV before they were enrolled in the study. 15 % (49/323) answered questions about causal relationships between HPV, cervical cancer and genital warts correctly. No correlations were found between HPV knowledge and age, sexual behaviour, or previous testing/history of chlamydia infection. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge about viral transmission and diseases associated with HPV is low among young Norwegian women.
PubMed ID
16932778 View in PubMed
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20 records – page 1 of 2.