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50 years of screening in the Nordic countries: quantifying the effects on cervical cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature257546
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-26-2014
Author
S. Vaccarella
S. Franceschi
G. Engholm
S. Lönnberg
S. Khan
F. Bray
Author Affiliation
International Agency for Research on Cancer, 150 cours Albert Thomas, 69372 Lyon cedex 08, France.
Source
Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):965-9
Date
Aug-26-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Early Detection of Cancer - methods
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Mass Screening - methods
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology
Scandinavia - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Abstract
Nordic countries' data offer a unique possibility to evaluate the long-term benefit of cervical cancer screening in a context of increasing risk of human papillomavirus infection.
Ad hoc-refined age-period-cohort models were applied to the last 50-year incidence data from Denmark, Finland, Norway and Sweden to project expected cervical cancer cases in a no-screening scenario.
In the absence of screening, projected incidence rates for 2006-2010 in Nordic countries would have been between 3 and 5 times higher than observed rates. Over 60,000 cases or between 41 and 49% of the expected cases of cervical cancer may have been prevented by the introduction of screening in the late 1960s and early 1970s.
Our study suggests that screening programmes might have prevented a HPV-driven epidemic of cervical cancer in Nordic countries. According to extrapolations from cohort effects, cervical cancer incidence rates in the Nordic countries would have been otherwise comparable to the highest incidence rates currently detected in low-income countries.
PubMed ID
24992581 View in PubMed
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Attack rates of human papillomavirus type 16 and cervical neoplasia in primiparous women and field trial designs for HPV16 vaccination.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature198554
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2000 Feb;76(1):13-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2000
Author
M. Kibur
V. af Geijerstamm
E. Pukkala
P. Koskela
T. Luostarinen
J. Paavonen
J. Schiller
Z. Wang
J. Dillner
M. Lehtinen
Author Affiliation
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Institute of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Tallinn, Estonia.
Source
Sex Transm Infect. 2000 Feb;76(1):13-7
Date
Feb-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Incidence
Longitudinal Studies
Papillomaviridae - immunology
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - prevention & control
Parity
Pregnancy
Research Design
Risk factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Viral Vaccines - administration & dosage
Abstract
Identification of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) as the major risk factor for cervical neoplasia, and mass production of DNA free HPV capsids have paved the way to preventive vaccination trials. Design of such trials requires reliable attack rate data.
Determination of (1) HPV16 and (2) cervical neoplasia attack rates in primiparous women. Estimation of actuarial sample sizes for HPV16 vaccination phase IV trials.
A longitudinal cohort study.
Population based Finnish Maternity Cohort (FMC) and Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR) were linked for the identification of two cohorts of primiparous women: (1) a random subsample of the FMC: 1656 women with two pregnancies between 1983-9 or 1990-6 and living in the Helsinki metropolitan area, and (2) all 72,791 primiparous women living in the same area during 1983-94. Attack rate for persistent HPV16 infection (1) was estimated in 1279 seronegative women by proportion of seroconversions between the first and the second pregnancy. Comparable 10 year cumulative incidence rate (CR) of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III and cervical cancer (CIN III+) (2) was estimated based on cases registered at the FCR during 1991-4.
The HPV16 attack rates were 13.8% (
Notes
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PubMed ID
10817062 View in PubMed
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Cervical cancer screening in Sweden 2014-2016.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature299833
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0209003
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Date
2018
Author
Maria Hortlund
K Miriam Elfström
Pär Sparén
Pouran Almstedt
Björn Strander
Joakim Dillner
Author Affiliation
Department of Laboratory Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
Source
PLoS One. 2018; 13(12):e0209003
Date
2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Keywords
Adult
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - physiology
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
To enable incremental optimization of screening, regular reporting of quality indicators is required.
To report key quality indicators and basic statistics about cervical screening in Sweden.
We collected individual level data on all cervical cytologies, histopathologies, human papillomavirus tests and all invitations for cervical screening in Sweden during 2013-2016.
There were over 2,278,000 cervical samples collected in Sweden in 2014-2016. Organized samples (resulting from an invitation) constituted 69% of samples. The screening test coverage of all resident women aged 23-60 was 82%. The coverage has slowly increased for >10 years. There is large variability between counties (from 71% to 92%) over time. There were 25,725 women with high-grade lesions in cytology during 2013-2015. Only 96% of these women had a follow-up histopathology within a year. Cervical cancer incidence showed an increasing trend.
Key quality indicators such as population coverage and follow-up rates were stable or improving, but there was nevertheless an unexplained cervical cancer increase.
PubMed ID
30557367 View in PubMed
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Determinants for genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in 1000 randomly chosen young Danish women with normal Pap smear: are there different risk profiles for oncogenic and nononcogenic HPV types?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature21933
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1997 Oct;6(10):799-805
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1997
Author
S K Kjaer
A J van den Brule
J E Bock
P A Poll
G. Engholm
M E Sherman
J M Walboomers
C J Meijer
Author Affiliation
Danish Cancer Society, Division for Cancer Epidemiology, Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1997 Oct;6(10):799-805
Date
Oct-1997
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Blotting, Southern
DNA, Viral - analysis
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Genital Diseases, Female - epidemiology - virology
Humans
Papillomavirus, Human - isolation & purification
Papovaviridae Infections - complications - epidemiology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
Risk factors
Tumor Virus Infections - complications - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Vaginal Smears
Abstract
Most studies of risk factors for human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detection have focused on overall HPV positivity and have not examined determinants for high-risk and low-risk HPV types separately. We studied risk determinants for genital HPV infection in 1000 randomly chosen women (20-29 years) with normal cervical cytology from Copenhagen, Denmark. All women had a personal interview, a Pap smear, and cervical swabs for HPV DNA detection using a PCR technique. On the basis of their association with cervical cancer, the HPV types were categorized as belonging to a high-risk group ("oncogenic types") or a low-risk group ("nononcogenic types"). The overall HPV detection rate was 15.4%. Of HPV-positive women, 74% had oncogenic HPV types, and 30% had nononcogenic HPV types. Younger age and lifetime measures of sexual activity (notably, number of partners) were the main risk factors for the oncogenic HPV types. Furthermore, a previous Chlamydia infection was associated with the high-risk HPV types. In contrast, the most important determinants for nononcogenic HPV infection were contraceptive variables related to the physical protection of the cervix (condom or diaphragm) and number of partners in the last 4 or 12 months. Our study confirms the venereal nature of HPV infection. We hypothesize that the low-risk HPV infection, which correlates with recent sexual behavior, may be more transient than infection with the oncogenic HPV types, which correlates with lifetime exposure measurements of sexual habits.
Notes
Comment In: Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 1997 Oct;6(10):759-619332755
PubMed ID
9332762 View in PubMed
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High-risk and low-risk human papillomavirus and the absolute risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature105163
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jan;123(1):57-64
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2014
Author
Louise T Thomsen
Kirsten Frederiksen
Christian Munk
Jette Junge
Philip E Castle
Thomas Iftner
Susanne K Kjaer
Author Affiliation
Unit of Virus, Lifestyle and Genes and Statistics, Bioinformatics and Registry, Danish Cancer Society Research Center, and the Gynecologic Clinic, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, and the Department of Pathology, Hvidovre Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre, Denmark; the Global Cancer Initiative, Chestertown, Maryland; and the University Hospital of Tübingen, Section of Experimental Virology, Tübingen, Germany.
Source
Obstet Gynecol. 2014 Jan;123(1):57-64
Date
Jan-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - epidemiology - virology
Cervix Uteri - pathology
Denmark - epidemiology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - genetics
Prospective Studies
Risk assessment
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
To determine the absolute risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 3 or cervical cancer (CIN 3 or worse) after detection of low-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) and after a negative high-risk HPV test.
In this prospective cohort study, consecutive liquid-based cervical cytology samples were collected from women screened for cervical cancer in Copenhagen, Denmark, during 2002-2005. Samples were tested with a clinical test for 13 high-risk and five low-risk HPV types. The cohort (N=35,539; aged 14-90 years) was monitored in a nationwide pathology register for up to 10.5 years for development of CIN 3 or worse.
The 8-year absolute risk of CIN 3 or worse was 1.1% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-1.3%) for HPV-negative women; 1.7% (0.8-2.6%) for low-risk HPV-positive women without concurrent high-risk HPV; 17.4% (16.4-18.5%) for high-risk HPV-positive women without concurrent low-risk HPV; and 15.9% (13.5-18.3%) for women with concurrent high-risk and low-risk HPV. The 8-year absolute risk of CIN 3 or worse after a negative high-risk HPV test (irrespective of low-risk HPV status) was lower than after a normal cytology result among women aged younger than 30 years (3.5% [95% CI, 2.9-4.0%] compared with 6.9% [6.2-7.5%], P
PubMed ID
24463664 View in PubMed
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High-risk human papillomavirus associated with incident cervical intraepithelial neoplasia developing in mothers in the Finnish Family HPV Study cohort.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature129895
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2012 Feb;44(2):115-25
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Marjut A M Rintala
Karolina Louvanto
Virpi Rantanen
Seija E Grénman
Kari J Syrjänen
Stina M Syrjänen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland.
Source
Scand J Infect Dis. 2012 Feb;44(2):115-25
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alphapapillomavirus - classification - genetics - isolation & purification
Case-Control Studies
Cohort Studies
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Logistic Models
Risk factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
Cofactors of high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) in the progression of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) are incompletely characterized. In this study these cofactors were investigated in a longitudinal setting.
A cohort of 329 women (mean age 25.5 y) were enrolled in the Finnish Family HPV Study, and followed-up for 6 y with serial cervical samples for HPV genotyping, virus integration status, and HPV serology. Hospital records were reviewed until March 2010 and linked with HPV detection data. All incident CIN lesions were subjected to HPV genotyping. HPV covariates were studied in an age- and HPV-matched nested case-control (1:4) setting.
Twelve of the 329 women developed an incident CIN: 2 CIN1, 3 CIN2, and 7 CIN3. HPV16 was detected most frequently (7/12), followed by HPV58 (2/12), HPV18, HPV31, and HPV42. HPV integration was present in 4/12 cases. Long-lasting persistence of HPV31 and HPV16 preceded incident CIN2 and CIN3. In multivariate conditional logistic regression, the risk for incident CIN increased up to 4-fold with increasing number of deliveries (p = 0.024) and decreased with history of genital warts (p = 0.036).
Baseline HR-HPV infections and their persistence precede incident CIN by several years. The 2 independent covariates of HR-HPV were (1) number of deliveries (increasing the risk), and (2) history of genital warts (protective effect).
PubMed ID
22053923 View in PubMed
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Source
Duodecim. 2015;131(19):1765-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Stina Syrjänen
Jaana Rautava
Source
Duodecim. 2015;131(19):1765-74
Date
2015
Language
Finnish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Genotype
Humans
Incidence
Male
Oropharyngeal Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Papillomaviridae - genetics
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - genetics - virology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Abstract
Almost all acquire a genital HPV infection at some point in their life. Oral infections are also common. The majority of the infections are asymptomatic and get cleared, spontaneously. There are 180 HPV genotypes, of which HPV16 is the main cause of cervical cancer in addition to other carcinomas. HPV-related oropharyngeal cancer incidence has almost tripled in the last 30 years in Finland. Of the eight genes of HPV, E6 and E7 are the most important oncogenes. HPV vaccinations have been effective in reducing female genital and anal dysplastic lesions, but their effectiveness on head and neck infections requires further research.
PubMed ID
26638661 View in PubMed
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HPV genotypes detected in cervical cancers from Alaska Native women, 1980-2007.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107719
Source
Pages 289-292 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):289-292
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
  1 document  
Author
Janet J Kelly
Elizabeth R Unger
Eileen F Dunne
Neil J Murphy
James Tiesinga
Kathy R Koller
Amy Swango-Wilson
Dino Philemonof
Xay Lounmala
Lauri E Markowitz
Martin Steinau
Thomas Hennessy
Author Affiliation
Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium, Division of Community Health Services, Epidemiology Center, 4000 Ambassador Drive, Anchorage, AK 99508, USA. jjkelly@anthc.org
Source
Pages 289-292 in N. Murphy and A. Parkinson, eds. Circumpolar Health 2012: Circumpolar Health Comes Full Circle. Proceedings of the 15th International Congress on Circumpolar Health, Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, August 5-10, 2012. International Journal of Circumpolar Health 2013;72 (Suppl 1):289-292
Date
2013
Language
English
Geographic Location
U.S.
Publication Type
Article
Digital File Format
Text - PDF
Physical Holding
University of Alaska Anchorage
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Female
Genotype
Genotyping Techniques
Human papillomavirus 16 - genetics
Human papillomavirus 18 - genetics
Humans
Indians, North American - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - genetics
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - genetics
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine prevents cervical pre-cancers and cancers caused by HPV types 16 and 18. This study provides information on the HPV types detected in cervical cancers of Alaska Native (AN) women.
Cases of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed in AN women aged 18 and above between 1980 and 2007 were identified from the Alaska Native Tumor Registry. A representative formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archived pathology block was retrieved and serially sectioned to allow histologic confirmation of lesion (first and last sections) and PCR testing of intervening sections. Extracted DNA was tested for HPV using Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Diagnostics) with additional INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Assay (Innogenetics) testing on negative or inadequate specimens. All specimens were tested for a minimum 37 HPV types.
Of 62 cervical cancer specimens evaluated, 57 (91.9%) contained one or more HPV types. Thirty-eight (61.2%) cancers contained HPV types 16 or 18, and 18 (29%) contained an oncogenic type other than type 16 or 18.
Overall, almost two-thirds (61.2%) of the archived cervical cancers had detectible HPV types 16 or 18, a finding similar to studies of US women. As expected, a proportion of cancers would not be prevented by the current vaccines. HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening are important prevention strategies for AN women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
23984281 View in PubMed
Documents
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Human papillomavirus type 56 polymorphism in Canadian women with and without cervical lesions.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature106253
Source
J Clin Virol. 2013 Dec;58(4):660-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2013
Author
Catherine Rodrigues-Coutlée
Jacques Archambault
Deborah Money
Agnihotram V Ramanakumar
Janet Raboud
Catherine Hankins
Anita Koushik
Harriet Richardson
Paul Brassard
Eduardo L Franco
Francois Coutlée
Author Affiliation
Centre de Recherche et Département de Microbiologie Médicale et Infectiologie, Centre Hospitalier de l'Université de Montréal (CHUM), Université de Montréal, Québec, Canada.
Source
J Clin Virol. 2013 Dec;58(4):660-5
Date
Dec-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - virology
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - genetics
Polymorphism, Genetic
Prospective Studies
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
The genomic diversity of high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) has been associated with viral persistence and HPV-induced lesions. Studies on HPV56 persistence are still pending.
To assess the association between HPV56 polymorphism and HPV56 persistence and presence of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2,3) or cancer.
HPV56-positive cervical specimens from 204 women selected from a total of 4669 participants recruited in 5 epidemiological studies (parent studies) were further analyzed by PCR-sequencing of the long control region (LCR).
Of the 81 women followed prospectively in cohort studies who could be classified, 34 had persistent and 47 had transient HPV56 infections. Variant HPV56-LCR-MTL-21 was detected more frequently in persistent infections (52.9%, 95% CI: 36.7-68.6%) than in transient infections (25.5%, 95% CI: 15.1-39.4). Considering only women recruited in a cohort of women infected or at high risk for HIV infection, infection with variant HPV56-LCR-MTL-21 (OR=4.4, 95% CI: 1.3-14.5) was significantly associated with HPV56 persistence controlling in multivariate analysis for high risk HPV detection and HIV infection. A variation at nucleotide 7800 in HPV56-LCR-MTL-21 resulted in the loss of a binding site for Elf-1 embedded in one of the E2 binding sites, a potential activator or repressor of expression of the HPV genome. HPV56 polymorphism was not associated with CIN2,3 or cancer in women enrolled in cross-sectional and case-control studies.
Polymorphism in HPV56 may influence the risk that infections with this type will persist.
PubMed ID
24210329 View in PubMed
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Incidence and predictors of human papillomavirus-6, -11, -16, and -18 infection in young norwegian women.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature137258
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2011 Jul;38(7):587-97
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2011
Author
Soyeon Kim
Jean Marie Arduino
Christine C Roberts
Mark Marsico
Kai-Li Liaw
Finn Egil Skjeldestad
Author Affiliation
Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health, New Jersey Medical School, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, NJ 07101, USA. kim20@umdnj.edu
Source
Sex Transm Dis. 2011 Jul;38(7):587-97
Date
Jul-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Antibodies, Viral - blood
Chlamydia Infections - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Chlamydia trachomatis - isolation & purification
Condylomata Acuminata - epidemiology - virology
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Human papillomavirus 11 - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Human papillomavirus 16 - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Human papillomavirus 18 - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Human papillomavirus 6 - genetics - immunology - isolation & purification
Humans
Incidence
Norway - epidemiology
Papillomavirus Infections - epidemiology - virology
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - epidemiology - virology
Young Adult
Abstract
Natural history data on human papillomavirus (HPV) incidence and its risk factors have not been reported on from young women in Norway. We report on incidence and predictors of HPV-6, 11, 16, and 18; 6 or 11; 16 or 18; or all 4.
A 48-month prospective study enrolled 898 women aged 16 to 24 between 1998 and 2000. HPV DNA polymerase chain reaction testing of genital tract specimens was performed and risk data collected every 6 months and HPV serology and genital Chlamydia trachomatis testing performed every 12 months. Cumulative incidence was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method and covariates evaluated in Cox models.
Among the women who were HPV DNA- and serology-negative at entry, 48-month cumulative incidences (95% confidence interval) were as follows: HPV-6: 20.0% (17.1-23.4), HPV-11: 2.2% (1.3-3.5), HPV-16: 25.0% (21.7-28.8), HPV-18: 13.6% (11.3-16.4), HPV-6 or -11: 21.5% (18.5-25.0), HPV-16 or -18: 30.4% (26.7-34.5), and HPV-6, -11, -16, or -18: 37.8% (33.6-42.3). Younger age at first intercourse, being single, having no regular partner, reporting new partners, and genital C. trachomatis infection were independent risk factors of incident HPV.
Proxies measuring new partnerships and genital C. trachomatis infection predicted incident HPV-6, -11, -16, or -18. Incidence of HPV-6, -11, -16, or -18 in young Norwegian women is high, with more than one-third becoming infected over 48 months.
PubMed ID
21301390 View in PubMed
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22 records – page 1 of 3.