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Effects of numerical information on intention to participate in cervical screening among women offered HPV vaccination: a randomised study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature285407
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Dec;34(4):401-419
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2016
Author
Mie Sara Hestbech
Dorte Gyrd-Hansen
Jakob Kragstrup
Volkert Siersma
John Brodersen
Source
Scand J Prim Health Care. 2016 Dec;34(4):401-419
Date
Dec-2016
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cohort Studies
Decision Making
Denmark
Female
Health Behavior
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Humans
Intention
Mass Screening
Papillomaviridae
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Surveys and Questionnaires
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control - virology
Vaccination
Young Adult
Abstract
To investigate the effects of different types of information about benefits and harms of cervical screening on intention to participate in screening among women in the first cohorts offered human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination.
Randomised survey study.
Denmark.
A random sample of women from the birth cohorts 1993, 1994 and 1995 drawn from the general population.
A web-based questionnaire and information intervention. We randomised potential respondents to one of the following four different information modules about benefits and harms of cervical screening: no information; non-numerical information; and two numerical information modules. Moreover, we provided HPV-vaccinated women in one of the arms with numerical information about benefits and harms in two steps: firstly, information without consideration of HPV vaccination and subsequently information conditional on HPV vaccination.
Self-reported intention to participate in cervical screening.
A significantly lower proportion intended to participate in screening in the two groups of women receiving numerical information compared to controls with absolute differences of 10.5 (95% CI: 3.3-17.6) and 7.7 (95% CI: 0.4-14.9) percentage points, respectively. Among HPV-vaccinated women, we found a significantly lower intention to participate in screening after numerical information specific to vaccinated women (OR of 0.38).
Women are sensitive to numerical information about the benefits and harms of cervical screening. Specifically, our results suggest that HPV-vaccinated women are sensitive to information about the expected changes in benefits and harms of cervical screening after implementation of HPV vaccination. KEY POINTS Women were less likely to participate in cervical screening when they received numerical information about benefits and harms compared to non-numerical or no information. Specifically, numerical information about the potential impact of the reduced risk of cervical cancer among HPV-vaccinated women reduced the intention to participate among vaccinated women.
Notes
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PubMed ID
27845597 View in PubMed
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Gynecological cancer patients' differentiated use of help from a nurse navigator: a qualitative study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature123206
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:168
Publication Type
Article
Date
2012
Author
Marianne K Thygesen
Birthe D Pedersen
Jakob Kragstrup
Lis Wagner
Ole Mogensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Odense University Hospital, Institute of Clinical Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Southern Denmark, Sdr, Boulevard, Odense, Denmark. mthygesen@health.sdu.dk
Source
BMC Health Serv Res. 2012;12:168
Date
2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Ambulatory Care Facilities
Attitude to Health
Continuity of Patient Care
Denmark
Diffusion of Innovation
Female
Gynecology - manpower
Humans
Interviews as Topic
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Nurse Clinicians - utilization
Nurse's Role
Nurse-Patient Relations
Oncology Nursing - manpower
Physician-Patient Relations
Qualitative Research
Questionnaires
Residence Characteristics
Treatment Outcome
Trust - psychology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - psychology - surgery
Abstract
Fragmentation in healthcare can present challenges for patients with suspected cancer. It can add to existing anxiety, fear, despair and confusion during disease trajectory. In some circumstances patients are offered help from an extra contact person, a Nurse Navigator (NN). Scientific studies showing who will benefit from the extra help offered are missing. This study aims to explore who could benefit from the help on offer from a nurse appointed as NN in the early part of a cancer trajectory, and what would be meaningful experiences in this context.
A longitudinal study with a basis in phenomenology and hermeneutics was performed among Danish women with gynecological cancer. Semi-structured interviews provided data for the analysis, and comprehensive understanding was arrived at by first adopting an open-minded approach to the transcripts and by working at three analytical levels.
Prior experience of trust, guarded trust or distrust of physicians in advance of encountering the NN was of importance in determining whether or not to accept help from the NN. For those lacking trust in physicians and without a close relationship to a healthcare professional, the NN offered a new trusting relationship and they felt reassured by her help.
Not everyone could use the help offered by the NN. This knowledge is vital both to healthcare practitioners and to administrators, who want to do their best for cancer patients but who are obliged to consider financial consequences. Moreover patients' guarded trust or distrust in physicians established prior to meeting the NN showed possible importance for choosing extra help from the NN. These findings suggest increased focus on patients' trust in healthcare professionals. How to find the most reliable method to identify those who can use the help is still a question for further debate and research.
Notes
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PubMed ID
22721253 View in PubMed
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The impact of HPV vaccination on future cervical screening: a simulation study of two birth cohorts in Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature272510
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(8):e007921
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
Mie Sara Hestbech
Elsebeth Lynge
Jakob Kragstrup
Volkert Siersma
Miguel Vazquez-Prada Baillet
John Brodersen
Source
BMJ Open. 2015;5(8):e007921
Date
2015
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Denmark
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
Humans
Mass Screening
Middle Aged
Papillomavirus Infections - diagnosis - prevention & control
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Predictive value of tests
Primary Prevention
Risk Reduction Behavior
Secondary Prevention
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - prevention & control - virology
Vaginal Smears
Young Adult
Abstract
To explore the interplay between primary and secondary prevention of cervical cancer by estimating future screening outcomes in women offered human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination when they were sexually naïve.
Estimation of outcome of liquid-based cytology screening for a post-HPV vaccination cohort using pre-vaccination screening data combined with HPV vaccination efficacy data reported in the literature.
Denmark.
The number of screening diagnoses at first screen in a pre-vaccination birth cohort was multiplied by reported risk reductions expected for women who were vaccinated for HPV before sexual debut. All identified studies were reviewed by two authors, and weighted pooled estimates of vaccine efficacies were used.
Proportions of positive and false-positive cervical cytologies and positive predictive value (PPV) were calculated using cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2+ and 3+ as cut-off values.
The proportion of positive screening tests was reduced from 8.7% before vaccination to 6.5% after vaccination, and the proportion of false-positive screening tests using CIN2+ as a cut-off was reduced from 5.5% pre-vaccination to 4.3% post-vaccination, and using CIN3+ as a cut-off from 6.2% to 4.7%. PPVs were reduced from 23% to 19% (cut-off CIN2+), and from 14% to 12% (cut-off CIN3+).
In our calculations, the proportion of positive screening results with liquid-based cytology will be reduced as a consequence of HPV vaccination, but the reduction is small, and the expected decline in PPV is very limited. In this situation, the information general practitioners will have to provide to their patients will be largely unchanged.
Notes
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PubMed ID
26275901 View in PubMed
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Reasons for diagnostic delay in gynecological malignancies.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature132665
Source
Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2011 Aug;21(6):967-74
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2011
Author
Mai Partridge Vandborg
René Depont Christensen
Jakob Kragstrup
Kasper Edwards
Peter Vedsted
Dorte Gilså Hansen
Ole Mogensen
Author Affiliation
Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark. mvandborg@health.sdu.dk
Source
Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2011 Aug;21(6):967-74
Date
Aug-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Delayed Diagnosis
Denmark
Endometrial Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology
Female
Genital Neoplasms, Female - diagnosis - pathology
Gynecological Examination
Humans
Logistic Models
Middle Aged
Ovarian Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology
Questionnaires
Referral and Consultation
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology
Vulvar Neoplasms - diagnosis - pathology
Women's Health Services
Young Adult
Abstract
To describe the different delay types in women with gynecological cancer and to analyze the relationship between diagnostic delay and a number of characteristics for patients, cancers, and the health care system.
Data were obtained from 4 different questionnaires, the Electronic Patient Journal (EPJ), and the Danish Gynecological Cancer Database (DGCD). A total of 161 women with ovarian cancer (63), endometrial cancer (50), cervical cancer (34), and vulvar cancer (14) were included. Outcome measures were different delay types counted in days and 4 clinically important variables' impact on the diagnostic delay: presence of alarm symptoms, age (divided into 2 groups: =60 or >60 years), performance of gynecological examination by the general practitioner (GP), and notification of cancer suspicion on first referral from GP.
Across cancer types, median total delay was 101 days. Some 10% of women experienced the longest delay with a total delay of 436 days or more. Vulva cancer had the longest delay, whereas women with ovarian cancer had the shortest delay. More than one third (39%) of the women consulted their GP for reasons other than the predefined alarm symptoms. Gynecological examination by the GP was less likely to be performed if the woman did not present with vaginal bleeding. The length of the delay was shortened by performance of a gynecological examination by the GP and a primary referral from the GP raising the receiver's suspicion of cancer.
Reducing diagnostic delays should be achievable, particularly for those most delayed, and interventions aimed at reducing delays need to be developed. Creation of new valid instruments for measuring delay is essential in future research.
Notes
Comment In: Int J Gynecol Cancer. 2012 Mar;22(3):34222228424
PubMed ID
21792008 View in PubMed
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