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[10-year cytodiagnosis of cervical carcinoma: results and further developments].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature111744
Source
Geburtshilfe Frauenheilkd. 1966 Aug;26(8):1135-44
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1966

Accuracy and false-positive rate of the cytologic diagnosis of follicular cervicitis: observations from the College of American Pathologists Pap Educational Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature112651
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Jul;137(7):907-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2013
Author
Manon Auger
Walid Khalbuss
Ritu Nayar
Chengquan Zhao
Patricia Wasserman
Rhona Souers
Nicole Thomas
Ann T Moriarty
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, McGill University and McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2B4, Canada.
Source
Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2013 Jul;137(7):907-11
Date
Jul-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - diagnosis - epidemiology
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - epidemiology
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology
False Positive Reactions
Female
Humans
Papanicolaou test
Reproducibility of Results
Retrospective Studies
Societies, Medical
United States - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Uterine Cervicitis - diagnosis - epidemiology
Vaginal Smears - methods - standards
Abstract
Follicular cervicitis is usually easily identifiable on Papanicolaou (Pap) tests; however, historically, follicular cervicitis is reported to lead to false-positive diagnoses of epithelial cell abnormalities.
To assess participant responses in the College of American Pathologists (CAP) Pap educational program (CAP-PAP) to determine the accuracy and false-positive rate of follicular cervicitis cases. Design.-We performed a retrospective review of 4914 participant responses for gynecologic cytology challenges with the reference diagnosis of follicular cervicitis during 11 years (2000-2010) from CAP-PAP. Reference diagnosis category, false-positive rates by participant type (laboratory, cytotechnologist, pathologist), and preparation type (conventional smears, ThinPrep) were analyzed.
Of the total 4914 general category responses, 4368 (88.9%) were benign while 546 (11.1%) responses were epithelial cell abnormalities (false positives). Of benign responses, only 2026 (46.4%) were an exact match to follicular cervicitis. Adenocarcinoma and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion were the most common diagnoses chosen as a false-positive interpretation (42.3% and 20.1%, respectively). Participant type was significantly associated with false-positive interpretations (laboratory: 19.2%; cytotechnologist: 11.1%; pathologist: 7.9%; P
PubMed ID
23808462 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of HPV testing of vaginal smear obtained with a novel self-sampling device.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature79114
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(1):16-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
Stenvall Harriet
Wikström Ingrid
Backlund Ingrid
Wilander Erik
Author Affiliation
Department of Genetics and Pathology, University Hospital of Uppsala, Sweden.
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2007;86(1):16-21
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control - virology
DNA, Viral - analysis
Female
Humans
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae - isolation & purification
Polymerase Chain Reaction
Predictive value of tests
Self Care
Sweden - epidemiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology - pathology - prevention & control - virology
Vaginal Smears - instrumentation
Abstract
BACKGROUND: Most of women diagnosed as having cervical cancer have not participated in organized cytological screening. Aim. A study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of human papilloma virus testing by self-collected vaginal samples in comparison to regular cytological screening. The agreement of hybrid capture 2 assay and polymerase chain reaction assay for detection of human papilloma virus DNA in self-collected vaginal samples and clinician-obtained cervical smears was investigated. METHOD: Forty-three women aged 23-58 years admitted for further examination due to previous positive cytology in the organized screening participated in self-collecting of vaginal samples with a novel self-sampling device. During the visit a clinician also collected a cervical smear using a cytobrush. The vaginal samples collected with the self-sampling device were analyzed for high-risk human papilloma virus with the hybrid capture 2 assay technique and the cervical smears were Pap-stained, examined cytologically and after that reanalyzed for human papilloma virus DNA using a polymerase chain reaction assay. RESULT: The vaginal samples were positive for high-risk human papilloma virus in 37% of the cases using hybrid capture 2 assay. Twelve of the 43 Pap smears showed positive cytology (ASCUS-CIN 3), of which 4 showed CIN 2-3. When polymerase chain reaction assay was performed, human papilloma virus DNA was detected in 40% of the glass slides. The agreement between cytology and the two human papilloma virus testing techniques was 67-74% (kappa 0.27-0.45) and the agreement between the two human papilloma virus tests was 70% (kappa 0.36). CONCLUSION: Testing for high-risk human papilloma virus can identify more women at risk of developing cervical cancer than cytology irrespective of the sampling method. Furthermore, offering a self-sampling device for collection of vaginal smear seems to be a useful screening tool for cervical cancer among women not responding to an invitation for smear sampling.
PubMed ID
17230283 View in PubMed
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Accuracy of registration of invasive cervical cancer.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature241362
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Dec 15;129(12):1275-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-15-1983
Author
J A Husted
T W Anderson
R. Gallagher
Source
Can Med Assoc J. 1983 Dec 15;129(12):1275-7
Date
Dec-15-1983
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
British Columbia
Diagnostic Errors
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Registries - standards
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - epidemiology
Abstract
The quality of the data recorded by the British Columbia Cancer Registry for 521 new cases of invasive cervical cancer was evaluated. The registry's pathological diagnosis in all new registrations of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed in British Columbia between 1977 and 1979 was compared with a best estimate of the true diagnosis, which was determined from the results of the provincial cervical cytology screening program and the clinical charts at the Cancer Control Agency of British Columbia. The registry's data overestimated the true incidence of invasive cervical cancer by approximately 55%, since 184 (35%) of the cases were incorrectly registered. Of the 184, 141 (77%) were cases of preinvasive cervical cancer, 26 (14%) did not meet the criteria for a true case (i.e., they were not newly diagnosed in British Columbia between 1977 and 1979) and 17 (9%) were cases of invasive cancer of another primary site. In addition, 28 cases of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed in the province during the study period had not been reported to the registry. Thus, both over-reporting and under-reporting occurred. There is a need for constant evaluation of registry data if cancer registries are to fulfil their potential contribution to cancer control programs and research.
Notes
Cites: Lancet. 1978 May 13;1(8072):1031-276945
Cites: Lancet. 1978 Oct 7;2(8093):776-880696
Cites: Lancet. 1979 May 12;1(8124):103886760
Cites: Gynecol Oncol. 1979 Dec;8(3):311-6510997
Cites: Arch Geschwulstforsch. 1980;50(6):588-977224815
Cites: Gynecol Oncol. 1981 Oct;12(2 Pt 2):S143-557308854
Cites: Natl Cancer Inst Monogr. 1982;62:83-77167199
PubMed ID
6652593 View in PubMed
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[A comparison between mass screening for uterine neck cancer in the Districts of Frederiksberg and Maribo]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature28349
Source
Nord Med. 1971 Dec 16;86(50):1534
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-16-1971

[A comparison of colcoscopic and cytological methods applied in Tampere's mass screening program, 1965-69].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature109092
Source
Duodecim. 1971;87(1):45-51
Publication Type
Article
Date
1971

Adherence over time to cervical cancer screening guidelines: insights from the Canadian National Population Health Survey.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature130574
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2012 Feb;21(2):199-208
Publication Type
Article
Date
Feb-2012
Author
Catherine Worthington
Kendra McLeish
Esme Fuller-Thomson
Author Affiliation
School of Public Health and Social Policy, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada.
Source
J Womens Health (Larchmt). 2012 Feb;21(2):199-208
Date
Feb-2012
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Emigration and Immigration
Female
Health Behavior
Health Surveys
Humans
Logistic Models
Longitudinal Studies
Middle Aged
Papillomaviridae
Patient Compliance - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Vaginal Smears - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Young Adult
Abstract
A substantial percentage of North American women are nonadherent to cervical cancer screening guidelines despite the effectiveness of the Papinicolaou (pap) test for papillomavirus. Our objective was to determine factors associated with changes in adherence for cervical cancer screening guidelines over a 14-year period.
Using data from cycles 1 (1994-1995) through 7 (2006-2007) of the Canadian National Population Health Survey, we used logistic regression to compare the regularity of pap testing (at least once every 36 months) among women. We compared women with increasing adherence to pap testing guidelines to those who were never adherent, and women with decreasing adherence to those who were always adherent. The sample included women aged 20-70 years who responded in at least three of seven waves of data collection and had not undergone a hysterectomy (n=4949). Independent variables were based on Andersen's Behavioral Model of predisposing, enabling, and need variables.
The majority of our sample were either always adherent (61.4%) or had increasing adherence (9.9%) over the course of the study. Another 4.8% were never adherent, and 6.6% had decreasing adherence over their involvement in the study. Predominantly, both enabling (e.g., presence of regular doctor) and need (e.g., birth control pill use, obesity) factors were associated with changing patterns of adherence.
Physicians have a crucial role to play in the trajectories of adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines over time. In addition, women with obesity need to be particularly targeted for services because they are vulnerable to negative trajectories in adherence over time.
PubMed ID
21988527 View in PubMed
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Adherence to the cervical cancer screening program in women living with HIV in Denmark: comparison with the general population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature259332
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2014;14:256
Publication Type
Article
Date
2014
Author
Kristina Thorsteinsson
Steen Ladelund
Søren Jensen-Fangel
Terese L Katzenstein
Isik Somuncu Johansen
Gitte Pedersen
Jette Junge
Marie Helleberg
Merete Storgaard
Anne-Mette Lebech
Source
BMC Infect Dis. 2014;14:256
Date
2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
CD4 Lymphocyte Count
Case-Control Studies
Denmark
Early Detection of Cancer
Female
HIV Infections
Humans
Mass Screening - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Odds Ratio
Patient Compliance - statistics & numerical data
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis
Vaginal Smears - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Women living with HIV (WLWH) are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). International HIV guidelines suggest cervical screening twice the first year after HIV diagnosis and thereafter annually. Adherence to the HIV cervical screening program in Denmark is unknown.
We studied women from a population-based, nationwide HIV cohort in Denmark and a cohort of age-matched females from the general population. Screening behaviour was assessed from 1999-2010. Adjusted odds ratios (OR's) for screening attendance in the two cohorts and potential predictors of attendance to guidelines were estimated. Pathology specimens were identified from The Danish Pathology Data Bank.
We followed 1143 WLWH and 17,145 controls with no prior history of ICC for 9,509 and 157,362 person-years. The first year after HIV diagnosis 2.6% of WLWH obtained the recommended two cervical cytologies. During the different calendar intervals throughout the study period between 29-46% of WLWH followed the HIV cervical screening guidelines. Adjusted OR's of attendance to the general population screening program for WLWH aged 30, 40 and 50 years, compared to controls, were 0.69 (95% CI: 0.56-0.87), 0.67 (0.55-0.80) and 0.84 (0.61-1.15). Predictors of attendance to the HIV cervical screening program were a CD4 count?>?350 cells/µL and HIV RNA?
Notes
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Cites: Prev Med. 2007 Aug-Sep;45(2-3):93-10617651792
Cites: Int J STD AIDS. 2007 Sep;18(9):639-4217918661
Cites: Obstet Gynecol. 2008 Jun;111(6):1388-9318515523
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Cites: HIV Med. 2006 Jan;7(1):46-5216313292
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Cites: J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr. 2006 Dec 15;43(5):550-517133212
PubMed ID
24885577 View in PubMed
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Age is prognostic variable in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature222168
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 1993;14(4):283-91
Publication Type
Article
Date
1993
Author
D. Robertson
D M Fedorkow
G C Stuart
S E McGregor
M A Duggan
G. Nation
Author Affiliation
Department of Pathology, Tom Baker Cancer Centre, and University of Calgary, Canada.
Source
Eur J Gynaecol Oncol. 1993;14(4):283-91
Date
1993
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Canada - epidemiology
Carcinoma, Squamous Cell - diagnosis - mortality
Female
Humans
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Invasiveness
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Recurrence
Retrospective Studies
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - diagnosis - mortality
Abstract
A clinico-pathologic review was performed on all younger (under 35 years) and older (55 years or over) women with a diagnosis of cervical squamous cell carcinoma assessed at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre from 1980 to 1985 to determine the effect of age at diagnosis on survival. 45 younger women were identified: 32 were Stage IB; 10, Stage II; and 3, Stage III. 64 older women were identified: 16 were Stage IB; 30, Stage II; 14, Stage III; and 4, Stage IV. For Stage IB women, 40.6% of younger patients developed persistent or recurrent disease and all except one are dead; only one (6.2%) older woman's tumour recurred and she is alive with disease. Younger women had a poorer disease-free survival not only for Stage IB disease (p = 0.014) but also in Stages II and III (p = 0.020). In this study age at diagnosis was an independent prognostic variable with younger women having a poorer disease-free and overall survival.
PubMed ID
8344321 View in PubMed
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407 records – page 1 of 41.