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Bladder cancer screening among primary aluminum production workers in Quebec.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228525
Source
J Occup Med. 1990 Sep;32(9):869-72
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1990
Author
G P Thériault
C G Tremblay
B G Armstrong
Author Affiliation
School of Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
Source
J Occup Med. 1990 Sep;32(9):869-72
Date
Sep-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aluminum - adverse effects
Humans
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Metallurgy
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Quebec
Risk factors
Survival Rate
Tars - adverse effects
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology - mortality
Urine - cytology
Volatilization
Abstract
We evaluated a cytology screening program, offered by a large aluminum producer after the discovery of an excess of bladder cancer due to occupational exposure to coal-tar-pitch volatiles, in terms of early detection and survival, based on information in the public domain. From January 1970 through June 1986, 79 cases of bladder cancer were identified in this cohort of aluminum workers aged 65 years or younger. By the end of 1986, 36 had died, with bladder cancer as the primary cause of death for 53%. Cases diagnosed after the screening program was introduced in 1980 were compared with those diagnosed earlier. In cases diagnosed after 1980, the proportion identified at early stages was higher (77% v 67%) and survival seemed improved but the differences were not statistically significant. Although these results do not encourage an optimistic view of screening effectiveness in this population, the limits inherent in the present study make it impossible to draw any firm conclusion. Studies restricted to public domain information do not appear to have sufficient data to evaluate workplace screening programs.
PubMed ID
2074510 View in PubMed
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[Comparative evaluation of colpo- and urocytographic methods]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66474
Source
Pediatr Akus Ginekol. 1973;3:49-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
1973

[Comparative evaluation of methods of colpo- and urocytograms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66453
Source
Pediatriia. 1973 Mar;(3):49-52
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-1973

[Comparative evaluation of the predictive value of UroVysion and AURKA FISH tests of urine sediment cells for the diagnosis of bladder cancer].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature107282
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2013;59(4):483-6
Publication Type
Article
Date
2013
Author
I E Vorobtsova
E D Kouzova
I S Kolesnikova
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2013;59(4):483-6
Date
2013
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence - economics
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local - diagnosis - economics - urine
Predictive value of tests
Russia
Urinalysis - methods
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - diagnosis - economics - urine
Urine - cytology
Abstract
Informative value of two tests based on FISH of exfoliated urothelial cells in urine sediment (AURKA and UroVysion) was compared in the group of patients (31 persons) with the history of bladder cancer. Coincidence in results of both FISH assays was found in 93.5%. These preliminary data offer the possibility of replacing the expensive UroVysion kit by the less expensive AURKA FISH probe and it could be used for monitoring of recurrence in bladder cancer patients.
PubMed ID
24032224 View in PubMed
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Emergency physicians versus laboratory technicians: are the urinalysis and microscopy results comparable? A pilot study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202082
Source
J Emerg Med. 1999 May-Jun;17(3):399-404
Publication Type
Article
Author
S. Kerr
C. Marshall
D. Sinclair
Author Affiliation
Department of Emergency Medicine, Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.
Source
J Emerg Med. 1999 May-Jun;17(3):399-404
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Clinical Competence
Clinical Laboratory Techniques - standards
Emergency Medicine - standards
Female
Humans
Male
Microscopy
Middle Aged
Nova Scotia
Pilot Projects
Reagent kits, diagnostic
Sensitivity and specificity
Urinalysis - methods - standards
Urine - cytology - microbiology
Abstract
In the literature to date, there are no studies that directly evaluate microscopic urine examination results obtained by a physician compared to those of a trained laboratory technician. Our purpose in undertaking this study was to determine whether there would be comparable results obtained by these two groups. The study took place in an Emergency Medicine Department with 45,000 visits annually. Each urine sample obtained on patients presenting to the Emergency Department was divided into two lots: one was sent to the laboratory and the other was analyzed by the emergency physician. A comparison of both dipstick and microscopic results by physician and laboratory staff was then made using sensitivity, specificity, and Kappa analysis. Statistical analysis of the data revealed close agreement between the emergency physician and laboratory technician with respect to the following components of urinalysis: red blood cell urinalysis and microscopy, leukocyte esterase, and nitrite testing. Microscopy for white cells and bacteria and testing for proteinuria were not in close agreement. Urinalysis by emergency physicians is comparable to laboratory technicians for a number of the testing components. However, in this limited pilot study, emergency physicians were not able to consistently perform urinalysis for the laboratory standard.
PubMed ID
10338228 View in PubMed
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Prevalence of asymptomatic bacteriuria and associated host factors in women with diabetes mellitus. The Manitoba Diabetic Urinary Infection Study Group.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature214593
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1995 Aug;21(2):316-22
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1995
Author
G G Zhanel
L E Nicolle
G K Harding
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada.
Source
Clin Infect Dis. 1995 Aug;21(2):316-22
Date
Aug-1995
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacteria - isolation & purification
Bacteriuria - epidemiology - urine
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 - complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 - complications
Female
Hospitals, University
Humans
Leukocyte Count
Manitoba - epidemiology
Middle Aged
Prevalence
Prospective Studies
Risk factors
Urine - cytology - microbiology
Abstract
A prospective study was undertaken to determine the prevalence of significant asymptomatic bacteriuria in adult women with diabetes mellitus attending endocrinology clinics at two tertiary-care university-affiliated teaching hospitals. In addition, host factors of the patients were correlated with bacteriuria. The overall prevalence of bacteriuria was 7.9% (85 cases per 1,072 women). Absolute urinary leukocyte (white blood cell) counts were > or = 10/mm3 in 77.6% (66) of the 85 bacteriuric women vs. 23.7% (234) of the 987 nonbacteriuric women (P
PubMed ID
8562738 View in PubMed
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Radiological and cytological detection of renal pelvic transitional-cell carcinoma.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature25136
Source
Rofo. 1990 Sep;153(3):266-70
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-1990
Author
M. Päivänsalo
J. Merikanto
V. Myllylä
P. Hellström
M. Kallionen
P. Jalovaara
Author Affiliation
Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source
Rofo. 1990 Sep;153(3):266-70
Date
Sep-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Carcinoma, Transitional Cell - diagnosis - radiography - ultrasonography
Comparative Study
Female
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - diagnosis - radiography - ultrasonography
Kidney Pelvis
Male
Middle Aged
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Urine - cytology
Urography - methods
Abstract
We evaluated US, CT, intravenous urography, arteriography, retrograde pyelography and urine cytology results in a series of 23 patients with renal pelvic transitional-cell carcinomas, 14 of whom underwent US, 17 i.v. urography, 8 CT, 15 arteriography, 9 retrograde pyelography, and 17 patients urine cytology. A tumour was identified in 5 patients (36%) at US, in 11 patients (61%) at urography, in 7 (88%) at CT, in 10 patients (67%) at arteriography, and in 8 (89%) at retrograde pyelography. Urine cytology was assessed as showing changes consistent with Papanicolaou class III-V in 15 (88%) of 17 patients. When renal pelvic cancer is suspected, intravenous urography should be performed as the initial radiological examination and followed by CT, which may also identify tumour spread. Arteriography and retrograde pyelography are sometimes complementary investigations. Repeated urinary cytology is mandatory. Our results show that US alone is unreliable in detecting renal pelvic cancer.
PubMed ID
2171058 View in PubMed
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Screening for bacteriuria in school-girls. An evaluation of a dip-slide culture methods and the urinary glucose method.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature43322
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1973 Apr;97(4):246-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1973

Screening of urine samples by flow cytometry reduces the need for culture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature142496
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2010 Sep;48(9):3117-21
Publication Type
Article
Date
Sep-2010
Author
Santra Jolkkonen
Eeva-Liisa Paattiniemi
Pauliina Kärpänoja
Hannu Sarkkinen
Author Affiliation
Päijät-Häme Social and Health Care Group, Department of Clinical Microbiology, Keskussairaalankatu 7, SF-15850 Lahti, Finland. santra.jolkkonen@phsotey.fi
Source
J Clin Microbiol. 2010 Sep;48(9):3117-21
Date
Sep-2010
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Bacterial Infections - diagnosis - microbiology
Bacterial Load
Bacteriological Techniques - methods
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Finland
Flow Cytometry - methods
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Leukocyte Count
Male
Mass Screening - methods
Middle Aged
Predictive value of tests
Sensitivity and specificity
Urinary Tract Infections - diagnosis - microbiology
Urine - cytology - microbiology
Young Adult
Abstract
Urine samples constitute a large proportion of samples tested in clinical microbiology laboratories. Culturing of the samples is fairly time- and labor-consuming, and most of the samples will yield no growth or insignificant growth. We analyzed the feasibility of the flow cytometry-based UF-500i instrument (Sysmex, Japan) to screen out urine samples with no growth or insignificant growth and reduce the number of samples to be cultured. A total of 1,094 urine specimens sent to our laboratory for culture during 4 months in the spring of 2009 in Lahti, Finland, were included in the study. After culture, all samples were analyzed with the Sysmex UF-500i for bacterial and leukocyte (white blood cell [WBC]) counts. Youden index and closest (0,1) methods were used to determine the cutoff values for bacterial and WBC counts in culture-positive and -negative groups. By flow cytometry, samples considered positive for UTI in culture had bacterial and WBC values that were significantly higher than those for samples considered negative. The flow cytometric screening worked best when both bacterial counts and WBC counts were used with age- and gender-specific cutoff values for all patient groups, excluding patients with urological disease or anomaly. By use of these cutoff values, 5/167 (3.0%) of culture-positive samples were missed by UF-500i and the percentage of samples that did not need to be cultured was 64.5%. Use of the UF-500i instrument is a reliable method for screening out a major part of the UTI-negative samples, significantly diminishing the amount of work required in the microbiology laboratory.
Notes
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PubMed ID
20592157 View in PubMed
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15 records – page 1 of 2.