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34 records – page 1 of 4.

Anal and urinary incontinence in women with obstetric anal sphincter rupture.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature64429
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1996 Oct;103(10):1034-40
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-1996
Author
T. Tetzschner
M. Sørensen
G. Lose
J. Christiansen
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Glostrup County Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
Source
Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1996 Oct;103(10):1034-40
Date
Oct-1996
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries
Electromyography
Fecal Incontinence - etiology
Female
Humans
Manometry
Obstetric Labor Complications
Pelvis - innervation
Pregnancy
Puerperal Disorders - etiology
Reaction Time
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Risk factors
Rupture
Urinary Incontinence - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To assess the long term impact of obstetric anal sphincter rupture on the frequency of anal and urinary incontinence and to identify factors to predict women at risk. DESIGN: An observational study. SETTINGS: Departments of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and of Surgery D, Glostrup County University Hospital, Denmark. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-four consecutive women who had sustained an obstetric anal sphincter rupture. INTERVENTIONS: Assessment of history, anal manometry, anal sphincter electromyography and pudendal nerve terminal motor latency at three months postpartum A questionnaire regarding anal and urinary incontinence was sent two to four years postpartum. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The frequency of anal and urinary incontinence and risk factors for the development of incontinence. RESULTS: Thirty of 72 women (42%) who responded had anal incontinence two to four years postpartum; 23 (32%) had urinary incontinence and 13 (18%) had both urinary and anal incontinence. Overall, 40 of 72 women (56%) had incontinence symptoms. The occurrence of anal incontinence was associated with pudendal nerve terminal motor latencies of more than 2.0 ms, and the occurrence of urinary incontinence was associated with the degree of rupture, the use of vacuum extraction and previous presence of urinary incontinence. Seventeen women had subsequently undergone a vaginal delivery in relation to which four (24%) had aggravation of anal incontinence, and three (18%) had aggravation of urinary incontinence. Of the women with incontinence, 38% wanted treatment but only a few had sought medical advice. CONCLUSIONS: Obstetric anal sphincter rupture is associated with a risk of approximately 50% for developing either anal or urinary incontinence or both. The prediction of women at risk is difficult. Information and routine follow up of all women with obstetric anal sphincter rupture is mandatory.
Notes
Comment In: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Jun;104(6):753-49197889
Comment In: Br J Obstet Gynaecol. 1997 Jun;104(6):754-59197890
PubMed ID
8863705 View in PubMed
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Are smoking and other lifestyle factors associated with female urinary incontinence? The Norwegian EPINCONT Study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature9780
Source
BJOG. 2003 Mar;110(3):247-54
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Yngvild S Hannestad
Guri Rortveit
Anne Kjersti Daltveit
Steinar Hunskaar
Author Affiliation
Section for General Practice and Section for Preventive Medicine, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Bergen, Norway.
Source
BJOG. 2003 Mar;110(3):247-54
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Alcohol Drinking - adverse effects
Body mass index
Case-Control Studies
Coffee - adverse effects
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Female
Humans
Life Style
Middle Aged
Obesity - complications
Odds Ratio
Regression Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Smoking - adverse effects
Tea - adverse effects
Urinary Incontinence - etiology
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine whether modifiable lifestyle factors such as smoking, obesity, physical activity and intake of alcohol or caffeinated drinks were associated with urinary incontinence in women. DESIGN: Cross sectional population-based study. SETTING: The Norwegian Epidemiology of Incontinence in the County of Nord-Tr?ndelag (EPINCONT) Study is part of a large survey performed in a county in Norway during 1995-1997. POPULATION: Women >/=20 years (n = 34,755, 75% of the invited) attended the first part of the survey and received the questionnaire. There were 27,936 (80% of source population) women who completed the incontinence part of the questionnaire. METHODS: Questionnaire covering several health topics including urinary incontinence was received at a screening station. Logistic regression analysis was used to adjust for confounding and to establish associations with the different outcomes under investigation: any incontinence, severe incontinence and stress, urge and mixed subtypes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Effect measure were odds ratios with corresponding 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS: Former and current smoking was associated with incontinence, but only for those who smoked more than 20 cigarettes per day. Severe incontinence was weakly associated with smoking regardless of number of cigarettes. The association between increasing body mass index and incontinence was strong and present for all subtypes. Increasing levels of low intensity physical activity had a weak and negative association with incontinence. Tea drinkers were at slightly higher risk for all types of incontinence. We found no important effects of high intensity physical activity, intake of alcohol or coffee. CONCLUSIONS: Several potentially modifiable lifestyle factors are associated with urinary incontinence. Highest odds ratios were found for body mass index, heavy smoking and tea drinking.
PubMed ID
12628262 View in PubMed
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Behind the scenes: partners' perceptions of quality of life post radical prostatectomy.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature190313
Source
Urol Nurs. 2000 Aug;20(4):254-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2000
Author
L. Butler
B. Downe-Wamboldt
S. Marsh
D. Bell
K. Jarvi
Author Affiliation
Queen Elizabeth II Health Sciences Centre, Dalhousie University Faculty of Graduate Studies and School of Nursing, Halifax, Nova Scotia.
Source
Urol Nurs. 2000 Aug;20(4):254-8
Date
Aug-2000
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada
Erectile Dysfunction - etiology
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Postoperative Complications
Prostatectomy - rehabilitation
Quality of Life
Sexuality
Spouses
Urinary Incontinence - etiology
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the experience of a radical prostatectomy on the partners of men with prostate cancer. The women described the effects of the experience on their lives and on their partner's life. Descriptions included how they were informed of their partner's diagnosis, emotions at the time of the initial diagnosis, and the sources of information and the decision process that they and their partners used that lead to surgery. The effect of the experience on their quality of life including interpersonal and sexual relationships with their partner and the information that was needed to facilitate self-care after surgery were described. The women provided clear directions for improving the health care system in managing the cancer experience using a family-centered approach.
PubMed ID
11998088 View in PubMed
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Cauda equina syndrome after spinal anaesthesia with hyperbaric 5% lignocaine: a review of six cases of cauda equina syndrome reported to the Swedish Pharmaceutical Insurance 1993-1997.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202266
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1999 Apr;43(4):371-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1999
Author
C C Loo
L. Irestedt
Author Affiliation
Dept. of Anaesthesia, KK Women's & Children's Hospital, Republic of Singapore.
Source
Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1999 Apr;43(4):371-9
Date
Apr-1999
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Adverse Drug Reaction Reporting Systems
Anesthesia, Spinal - adverse effects - instrumentation - methods
Anesthetics, Local - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Cauda Equina - drug effects
Fecal Incontinence - etiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Lidocaine - administration & dosage - adverse effects
Male
Middle Aged
Nerve Compression Syndromes - chemically induced
Penile Erection
Pressure
Sensation Disorders - etiology
Sweden
Urinary Incontinence - etiology
Urination Disorders - etiology
Abstract
Six cases of cauda equina syndrome with varying severity were reported to the Swedish Pharmaceutical Insurance during the period 1993-1997. All were associated with spinal anaesthesia using hyperbaric 5% lignocaine. Five cases had single-shot spinal anaesthesia and one had a repeat spinal anaesthetic due to inadequate block. The dose of hyperbaric 5% lignocaine administered ranged from 60 to 120 mg. Three of the cases were most likely caused by direct neurotoxicity of hyperbaric 5% lignocaine. In the other 3 cases, direct neurotoxicity was also probable, but unfortunately radiological investigations were not done to definitely exclude a compressive aetiology. All cases sustained permanent neurological deficits. We recommend that hyperbaric lignocaine should be administered in concentrations not greater than 2% and at a total dose preferably not exceeding 60 mg.
Notes
Comment In: Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1999 Apr;43(4):369-7010225067
PubMed ID
10225068 View in PubMed
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Clinical symptoms after anal sphincter rupture: a retrospective study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature63534
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Mar;82(3):246-50
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-2003
Author
Johanna Wagenius
Jan Laurin
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital of Helsingborg, Helsingborg, Sweden. johanna.wagenuis@helsingborgslasarett.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2003 Mar;82(3):246-50
Date
Mar-2003
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Anal Canal - injuries - physiopathology - surgery
Case-Control Studies
Delivery, Obstetric - adverse effects
Dyspareunia - etiology
Fecal Incontinence - etiology
Female
Flatulence - etiology
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Obstetric Labor Complications - physiopathology
Pregnancy
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Retrospective Studies
Rupture - etiology - surgery
Urinary Incontinence - etiology
Abstract
BACKGROUND: To evaluate the current anal sphincter function, the frequency of urinary incontinence and of dyspareunia in patients with earlier anal sphincter rupture following vaginal delivery. DESIGN: Retrospective case-control study between 1994 and 1999 at the Central Hospital of Helsingborg, Sweden. PARTICIPANTS: Two hundred and eighteen women with a history of obstetric anal sphincter rupture and 436 matched controls. METHODS: Postal questionnaire regarding anal incontinence, urinary incontinence, dyspareunia and lifestyle alterations. Obstetric data were collected from hospital records. RESULTS: Of the 654 women included, 534 (82%) responded at a median follow up of 4 ears. Anal incontinence was significantly more common among patients with sphincter rupture. Sixty-one (33%) reported incontinence of flatus and 39 (21%) incontinence of liquid stools compared with 53 (15%) and 26 (7%) in the control group. Dyspareunia was reported by 26 (14%) patients and 20 (6%) controls. The symptoms of dyspareunia seemed to decrease with time. There was no significant difference in urinary incontinence between the two groups. A third of the women in the case group claimed that their problems with anal incontinence affected their daily lives, but only a few had asked for medical assistance. CONCLUSIONS: Anal sphincter rupture is strongly associated with anal incontinence and dyspareunia several years postpartum. The complaints affect the daily lives of these women to a great extent.
PubMed ID
12694121 View in PubMed
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[Complications and effectiveness of treatment of patients with locally advanced prostate cancer after combined radiotherapy and radical prostatectomy with postoperative radiotherapy].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature263695
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2015;61(1):145-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2015
Author
V A Solodky
A Yu Pavlov
G A Panshin
A D Tsybulsky
S V Garmash
T K Isaev
I B Kravtsov
Source
Vopr Onkol. 2015;61(1):145-8
Date
2015
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adenocarcinoma - pathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Erectile Dysfunction - etiology
Humans
Incidence
Intraoperative Period
Iridium Radioisotopes - administration & dosage - adverse effects - therapeutic use
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Postoperative Period
Prostatectomy - methods
Prostatic Neoplasms - pathology - radiotherapy - surgery
Radiotherapy, Adjuvant - adverse effects
Russia
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Incontinence - etiology
Abstract
Treatment for prostate cancer remains a significant social problem due to the continuing trend of growth of morbidity and mortality in Russia from this disease. In recent years a real alternative to surgical treatment is radiotherapy. In treatment of locally advanced stages of prostate cancer radiotherapy plays a dominant role. At our institution from 2005 till 2011, 105 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer underwent complex and combined treatment comprising in the first group the concomitant radiotherapy with Ir-192 and the control group--radical prostatectomy followed by adjuvant remote radiotherapy. In patients treated with concomitant radiotherapy compared to the control group there were occurred fewer number of genitourinary complications according to the RTOG scale (5,8% vs. 32,7%). In patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy followed by adjuvant radiotherapy urinary incontinence was met significantly often.
PubMed ID
26016162 View in PubMed
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The Danish Prostatic Symptom Score (DAN-PSS-1) questionnaire is reliable in stroke patients.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature170033
Source
Neurourol Urodyn. 2006;25(4):319-23
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Sigrid Tibaek
Rigmor Jensen
Peter Klarskov
Helle K Iversen
Gunvor Gard
Author Affiliation
Department of Geriatrics and Rheumatology, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup, Denmark. Sigrid.Tibaek@get2net.dk
Source
Neurourol Urodyn. 2006;25(4):319-23
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Cost of Illness
Denmark
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Prospective Studies
Prostate
Questionnaires - standards
Reproducibility of Results
Severity of Illness Index
Stroke - complications - physiopathology - psychology
Urinary Incontinence - etiology - physiopathology - psychology
Abstract
To investigate the test-retest reliability of Danish Prostatic Symptom Score (DAN-PSS-1) questionnaire in a sample of stroke patients.
A prospective study design was used in which the stroke patients were invited to complete a postal self-administrated DAN-PSS-1 questionnaire twice. The questionnaire consists of 12 questions related to lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). The participants were asked to state the frequency and severity of their symptoms (symptom score) and its impact on their daily life (bother score). Seventy-one stroke patients were included and 59 (83%) answered the questionnaire twice. The reliability test was done in two aspects: (a) detecting the frequency of each symptom and its bother factor, the scores were reduced to a two-category scale (=0, >0) and simple kappa statistics was used; (b) detecting the severity of each symptom and its bother factor, the total scale (0-3) and weighted kappa statistics was used.
The proportion of agreement for the frequency symptom scores ranged from 76% to 97% and the simple kappa coefficient ranged from poor (kappa = 0.00) to excellent (kappa = 0.91). The proportion of agreement for the corresponding bother scores ranged from 76% to 95% and the simple kappa coefficient ranged from good (kappa = 0.61) to excellent (kappa = 0.84). The weighted kappa coefficient for the severity symptom scores ranged from moderate (kappa(w) = 0.43) to good (kappa(w) = 0.75) and the corresponding bother scores ranged from moderate (kappa(w) = 0.48) to good (kappa(w) = 0.68).
The DAN-PSS-1 questionnaire had acceptable test-retest reliability and may be suitable for measuring the frequency and severity of LUTS and its bother factor in stroke patients.
Notes
Erratum In: Neurourol Urodyn. 2008;27(1):100
PubMed ID
16568420 View in PubMed
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Epidural spinal myelolipoma in a dog.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86056
Source
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 2007 Mar-Apr;43(2):132-5
Publication Type
Article
Author
Ueno Hiroshi
Miyake Tsuyoshi
Kobayashi Yoshiyasu
Yamada Kazutaka
Uzuka Yuji
Author Affiliation
Faculty of Applied Biological Sciences, Department of Clinical Veterinary Science, Gifu University, 1-1 Yanagido, Gifu, 501-1193 Japan.
Source
J Am Anim Hosp Assoc. 2007 Mar-Apr;43(2):132-5
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenal Gland Neoplasms - complications - diagnosis - surgery - veterinary
Animals
Dog Diseases - diagnosis - etiology - pathology - surgery
Dogs
Epidural Neoplasms - complications - diagnosis - surgery - veterinary
Laminectomy - veterinary
Magnetic Resonance Imaging - veterinary
Male
Myelolipoma - complications - diagnosis - surgery - veterinary
Paresis - etiology - veterinary
Tomography, X-Ray Computed - veterinary
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Bladder, Neurogenic - etiology - veterinary
Urinary Incontinence - etiology - veterinary
Urinary Retention - etiology - veterinary
Abstract
Epidural spinal myelolipoma was diagnosed in a 13-year-old, male Siberian husky that was referred for evaluation of progressive pelvic limb paresis and urinary incontinence. An epidural mass was detected by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. The mass was removed and identified histopathologically as an epidural myelolipoma. Pelvic limb paresis improved after surgery, but urinary retention associated with neurological bladder dysfunction persisted.
PubMed ID
17339292 View in PubMed
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[Hyperbaric oxygen treatment for radiation reactions]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature20418
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Mar 30;120(9):1020-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Mar-30-2000
Author
L. Aanderud
E. Thorsen
G. Brattebø
M. Forland
G. Kristensen
Author Affiliation
Yrkesmedisinsk avdeling Haukeland Sykehus, Bergen.
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2000 Mar 30;120(9):1020-2
Date
Mar-30-2000
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Bladder - radiation effects
English Abstract
Hematuria - etiology - therapy
Hemorrhage - etiology - therapy
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation - adverse effects - methods
Intestines - radiation effects
Neoplasms - radiotherapy
Norway
Patient satisfaction
Pelvis - radiation effects
Questionnaires
Radiation Injuries - etiology - therapy
Rectal Diseases - etiology - therapy
Urinary Incontinence - etiology - therapy
Abstract
BACKGROUND: A national hyperbaric centre was established in 1994 at Haukeland Hospital with responsibility for all hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment in Norway. In hypoxic tissues with symptomatic radiation reactions, hyperbaric oxygen induces the formation of collagen and angiogenesis resulting in permanently improved local microcirculation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 234 patients received elective HBO treatment at Haukeland Hospital in 1997 with a total of 4,048 treatments. All 47 patients treated for radiation reactions in the pelvic area in 1997 received a questionnaire 3-15 months after HBO therapy; 81% responded. RESULTS: Rectal bleeding and haematuria were reported as much improved in 61% and 55% respectively, while bladder incontinence was much improved in 46%. INTERPRETATION: This treatment modality may be an alternative in symptomatic radiation reactions of the urinary bladder and the bowel when conventional treatment has given unsatisfactory results.
PubMed ID
10833959 View in PubMed
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Hysterectomy and incontinence: a study from the Swedish national register for gynecological surgery.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature169006
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(5):614-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Marie A Ellström Engh
Lena Otterlind
Jan-Henrik Stjerndahl
Mats Löfgren
Author Affiliation
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden. marie.ellstrom@vgregion.se
Source
Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand. 2006;85(5):614-8
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Case-Control Studies
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Hysterectomy - adverse effects - methods
Middle Aged
Registries
Sweden
Urinary Incontinence - etiology
Abstract
Hysterectomy is one factor that has been suggested to be a risk factor for developing stress incontinence. In Sweden, with a population of 8.86 million, a national register was set up in 1997 in order to have data for assessing the quality of gynecological surgery for benign disorders.
Data in the Swedish national register for gynecological surgery during the period 1997-2002 were investigated. Surgical methods compared during this time period were: total hysterectomy (abdominal/laparoscopic, n=198/116), subtotal hysterectomy (abdominal/laparoscopic, n=163/86), and total hysterectomy (vaginal/laparoscopic assisted vaginal, n=265/7). Patients who underwent endometrial destruction (endometrial ablation, endometrial balloon treatment, n=187) were used as a control group. Only patients with no preoperative complaints were included. Outcome measures were answers to subjective questions asked pre- and postoperatively regarding urinary problems and incontinence.
De novo symptoms of stress incontinence, urgency and urgency incontinence, and/or mixed incontinence were noted in all groups. No differences were found among the groups.
Factors other than hysterectomy should be discussed causing stress incontinence in women.
PubMed ID
16752243 View in PubMed
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34 records – page 1 of 4.