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Treatment of stress urinary incontinence with a mobile app: factors associated with success.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature297755
Source
Int Urogynecol J. 2018 09; 29(9):1325-1333
Publication Type
Journal Article
Date
09-2018
Author
Emma Nyström
Ina Asklund
Malin Sjöström
Hans Stenlund
Eva Samuelsson
Author Affiliation
Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Unit of Research, Education and Development-Östersund, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. emma.nystrom@regionjh.se.
Source
Int Urogynecol J. 2018 09; 29(9):1325-1333
Date
09-2018
Language
English
Publication Type
Journal Article
Keywords
Adult
Exercise Therapy - methods
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Middle Aged
Mobile Applications - statistics & numerical data
Pelvic Floor
Pregnancy
Quality of Life
Self Care - methods
Sweden
Telemedicine - statistics & numerical data
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Incontinence, Stress - psychology - therapy
Abstract
Stress urinary incontinence is common among women. First-line treatment includes pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) and lifestyle advice, which can be provided via a mobile app. The efficacy of app-based treatment has been demonstrated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT). In this study, we aimed to analyze factors associated with successful treatment.
Secondary analysis of data from the RCT. At baseline and 3-month follow-up, participants (n?=?61) answered questions about symptoms, quality of life, background, and PFMT. Success was defined as rating the condition as much or very much better according to the validated Patient Global Impression of Improvement questionnaire. Factors possibly associated with success were analyzed with univariate logistic regression; if p?
Notes
CommentIn: Int Urogynecol J. 2018 Apr;29(4):613 PMID 29508042
CommentIn: Int Urogynecol J. 2018 Jun;29(6):925 PMID 29594320
PubMed ID
29222718 View in PubMed
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Women's experiences of internet-based or postal treatment for stress urinary incontinence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature264939
Source
Qual Health Res. 2014 Apr;24(4):484-93
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2014
Author
Anna-Bell Björk
Malin Sjöström
Eva E Johansson
Eva Samuelsson
Göran Umefjord
Source
Qual Health Res. 2014 Apr;24(4):484-93
Date
Apr-2014
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Female
Humans
Internet
Pelvic Floor
Postal Service
Sweden
Urinary Incontinence, Stress - psychology - therapy
Abstract
Stress urinary incontinence is common and sometimes embarrassing. New, simple, and easily accessible treatments are needed. We telephone interviewed 21 women who participated in a randomized controlled study comparing two treatment programs based on instructions for pelvic floor muscle training. One program was Internet-based and included email support by a urotherapist; the other was sent by post. There was no face-to-face contact in either program. Our main aim was to explore the women's experiences of the Internet-based treatment. Grounded theory analysis revealed three categories: hidden but present, at a distance but close, and by myself but not alone. These were incorporated in a core category: acknowledged but not exposed. The leakage was often a well-hidden secret, but the study treatments lowered the barrier for seeking care. In the Internet group, a supportive patient-provider relationship developed despite the lack of face-to-face contact. Internet-based treatment programs can increase access to care and empower women.
PubMed ID
24598777 View in PubMed
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