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79 records – page 1 of 8.

Acrylamide intake through diet and human cancer risk.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature92784
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6013-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-13-2008
Author
Mucci Lorelei A
Wilson Kathryn M
Author Affiliation
Channing Laboratory, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. lmucci@hsph.harvard.edu
Source
J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Aug 13;56(15):6013-9
Date
Aug-13-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Acrylamide - administration & dosage - analysis - toxicity
Adult
Animals
Body Weight
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Child
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Diet
Diet Records
Female
Food analysis
Humans
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Models, Animal
Neoplasms - chemically induced - epidemiology
Risk factors
Sweden - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
More than one-third of the calories consumed by U.S. and European populations contain acrylamide, a substance classified as a "probable human carcinogen" based on laboratory data. Thus, it is a public health concern to evaluate whether intake of acrylamide at levels found in the food supply is an important cancer risk factor. Mean dietary intake of acrylamide in adults averages 0.5 microg/kg of body weight per day, whereas intake is higher among children. Several epidemiological studies examining the relationship between dietary intake of acrylamide and cancers of the colon, rectum, kidney, bladder, and breast have been undertaken. These studies found no association between intake of specific foods containing acrylamide and risk of these cancers. Moreover, there was no relationship between estimated acrylamide intake in the diet and cancer risk. Results of this research are compared with other epidemiological studies, and the findings are examined in the context of data from animal models. The importance of epidemiological studies to establish the public health risk associated with acrylamide in food is discussed, as are the limitations and future directions of such studies.
PubMed ID
18624443 View in PubMed
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Analysis of clinical characteristics, management and survival of patients with Ta T1 bladder tumours in Sweden between 1997 and 2001.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature81045
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2006;40(4):276-82
Publication Type
Article
Date
2006
Author
Gårdmark Truls
Bladström Anna
Hellsten Sverker
Malmström Per-Uno
Members Of The Swedish National Bladder Cancer Registry
Author Affiliation
Department of Urology, Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. Truls.Gardmark@surgsci.uu.se
Source
Scand J Urol Nephrol. 2006;40(4):276-82
Date
2006
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Distribution
Aged
Delivery of Health Care
Demography
Female
Humans
Male
Odds Ratio
Registries
Survival Analysis
Sweden - epidemiology
Treatment Outcome
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - pathology - therapy
Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To analyse the management and outcome of patients with Ta T1 urinary bladder cancer in a population-based national database. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Between 1997 and 2001, 94% of all newly diagnosed cases of urinary bladder cancer were registered in the Swedish National Bladder Cancer Register. Data were analysed regarding gender, healthcare region, stage and grade for patients with Ta T1 tumours. The choice of initial treatment in different regions was reviewed. Survival was analysed by calculating relative survival. RESULTS: Out of 9859 registered patients, there were 4442 Ta tumours and 2139 T1 tumours. The median age at diagnosis was 72 and 73 years for patients with Ta and T1 tumours, respectively. Seventy-six percent of the patients were men. The choice of treatment varied between different healthcare regions. A significant trend towards an increased use of intravesical therapy was seen over time. Significantly fewer older than younger patients received such therapy. There was also a tendency towards more intensive therapy in men. The bladder cancer relative 5-year survival rate was 93% for Ta and 75% for T1 tumours. Survival was similar for men and women. CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis revealed a regional variation in the treatment of bladder cancer. A large group of patients, even those at high risk, were still undertreated. However, the recent publication of guidelines may have contributed to an increased use of intravesical treatment. Urologists tended to treat TaG3 and T1G3 tumours more aggressively than T1G2 tumours. Therapeutic aggressiveness decreased as the age of the patients increased. The survival rate of patients with bladder cancer in Sweden seems to remain at the levels previously reported for the 1980s.
PubMed ID
16916767 View in PubMed
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Are the apparent effects of cigarette smoking on lung and bladder cancers due to uncontrolled confounding by occupational exposures?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature219248
Source
Epidemiology. 1994 Jan;5(1):57-65
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-1994
Author
J. Siemiatycki
R. Dewar
D. Krewski
M. Désy
L. Richardson
E. Franco
Author Affiliation
Epidemiology and Biostatistics Unit, Institut Armand-Frappier, Université du Québec, Laval-des-Rapides, Canada.
Source
Epidemiology. 1994 Jan;5(1):57-65
Date
Jan-1994
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Canada - epidemiology
Case-Control Studies
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Environment
Epidemiologic Methods
Humans
Incidence
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Exposure - adverse effects - statistics & numerical data
Odds Ratio
Smoking - adverse effects - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
It has been suggested that the well known associations between smoking and cancer may in part reflect inadequately controlled confounding due to occupational exposures. The purpose of the present analysis is to describe the association between cigarette smoking and both lung and bladder cancers, taking into account the potential confounding effects of over 300 covariates, most of which represent occupational exposures. A population-based case-control study was undertaken in Montreal to investigate the associations between a large variety of environmental and occupational exposures, on the one hand, and several types of cancer, on the other. Interviews were carried out with male incident cases of several sites of cancer, including 857 lung cancers and 484 bladder cancers. A group of non-smoking-related cancers, comprising 1,707 interviewed subjects, was used as one control group. Additionally, 533 population controls were interviewed and constituted a second control group. Interview information included detailed lifetime smoking histories, job histories, and other potential confounders. Each job history was reviewed by a team of experts who translated it into a history of occupational exposures. These occupational exposures, as well as nonoccupational covariates, were treated as potential confounders in the analysis of cigarette smoking effects. Regardless of whether population controls or cancer controls were used, the odds ratio (OR) between smoking and lung cancer (ranging from 12 to 16 for ever vs never smokers) was not materially affected by adjustment for occupational exposures. The odds ratios for bladder cancer (ranging from 2 to 3) were also unaffected by confounding due to occupational exposures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
PubMed ID
8117783 View in PubMed
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Arsenic concentrations in prediagnostic toenails and the risk of bladder cancer in a cohort study of male smokers.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature177829
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 2004 Nov 1;160(9):853-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-1-2004

Association of albuminuria and cancer incidence.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature86667
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 May;19(5):992-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-2008
Author
Jørgensen Lone
Heuch Ivar
Jenssen Trond
Jacobsen Bjarne K
Author Affiliation
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, N-9037 Tromsø, Norway. lone.jorgensen@ism.uit.no
Source
J Am Soc Nephrol. 2008 May;19(5):992-8
Date
May-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Albuminuria - epidemiology
Breast Neoplasms - epidemiology
Colorectal Neoplasms - epidemiology
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Incidence
Kidney Neoplasms - epidemiology
Longitudinal Studies
Lung Neoplasms - epidemiology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms - epidemiology
Norway - epidemiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - epidemiology
Risk factors
Smoking - epidemiology
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
Abstract
Albuminuria, which is associated with noncardiovascular mortality, might be a result of altered vascular permeability caused by cytokines and other tumor cell products. The aim of this population-based, longitudinal study was to examine whether elevated albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR) is associated with cancer incidence. A total of 5425 participants without diabetes or previous cancer in the Tromsø Study were followed; 590 had a first diagnosis of cancer during 10.3 yr of follow-up. The ACR at baseline significantly correlated with the incidence of cancer, even after adjustment for age, gender, body mass index, physical activity, and smoking (P
PubMed ID
18256361 View in PubMed
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Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Oct 15;174(42):2549
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-15-2012
Author
Peter Thind
Jørgen Bjerggaard Jensen
Author Affiliation
Urologisk Klinik, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. peter.thind@regionh.dk
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2012 Oct 15;174(42):2549
Date
Oct-15-2012
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Databases, Factual
Denmark - epidemiology
Humans
Quality Assurance, Health Care
Registries
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology
PubMed ID
23079452 View in PubMed
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Bladder cancer in cancer patients: population-based estimates from a large Swedish study.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature95092
Source
Br J Cancer. 2009 Oct 6;101(7):1091-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-6-2009
Author
Bermejo J Lorenzo
Sundquist J.
Hemminki K.
Author Affiliation
Institute of Medical Biometry and Informatics (IMBI), University Hospital Heidelberg, 69120 Heidelberg, Germany. Justo.Lorenzo@imbi.uni-heidelberg.de
Source
Br J Cancer. 2009 Oct 6;101(7):1091-9
Date
Oct-6-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Incidence
Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin - complications
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasms, Second Primary - epidemiology - etiology
Prostatic Neoplasms - complications
Risk factors
Smoking - adverse effects
Sweden - epidemiology
Testicular Neoplasms - complications
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms - complications
Abstract
BACKGROUND: This study quantified the risk of urinary bladder neoplasms in cancer patients taking into account the age at first diagnosis, the gender of the patients and the lead time between diagnoses. METHODS: We used standardised incidence ratios (SIRs) to compare the incidence of bladder tumours in 967 767 cancer patients with the incidence rate in the general Swedish population. A total of 3324 male and 1560 female patients developed bladder tumours at least 1 year after first cancer diagnosis. RESULTS: After bladder and renal pelvis cancers, the SIRs of bladder neoplasms were higher in female than in male patients. Men affected by lung, stomach and larynx tumours belonged to the population at high risk for bladder cancer. Treatment of breast, ovarian and cervical cancers seems to contribute to the subsequent development of bladder neoplasms. Long latencies (16-25 years) were observed after testicular, cervical and endometrial cancers. Detection bias had an important role after prostate cancer. Chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide and cisplatin, and also radiotherapy, seem to increase the risk of subsequent neoplasms in the bladder. CONCLUSIONS: These population-based results may help urologists to assess the risk of bladder neoplasms in cancer survivors. Our data should guide ongoing studies that investigate the effectiveness of bladder cancer screening in cancer patients.
PubMed ID
19755987 View in PubMed
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Bladder cancer in pet dogs: a sentinel for environmental cancer?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature244284
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1981 Aug;114(2):229-33
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-1981
Author
H M Hayes
R. Hoover
R E Tarone
Source
Am J Epidemiol. 1981 Aug;114(2):229-33
Date
Aug-1981
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Animals
Animals, Domestic
Canada
Dog Diseases - epidemiology
Dogs
Female
Humans
Industry
Male
Middle Aged
Mortality
United States
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - veterinary
Abstract
Proportional morbidity ratios (PMRs) were calculated for cancers, by site or type, in 8760 pet dogs seen at 13 veterinary medical teaching hospitals in the United States and Canada. A significant positive correlation was seen between the PMRs for canine bladder cancer and the overall level of industrial activity in the host county of the hospital. An analysis of mortality from bladder cancer among white men and women in the same US counties showed similar correlations with industrial activity. Canine bladder cancer could be a sentinel condition whose investigation in locales might lead to early identification of carcinogenic hazards in the general environment.
PubMed ID
7304557 View in PubMed
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[Bladder cancer morbidity in individual territories of the RSFSR].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature236127
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1987;33(6):29-34
Publication Type
Article
Date
1987
Author
M B Prianichnikova
R S Kashafova
Source
Vopr Onkol. 1987;33(6):29-34
Date
1987
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Age Factors
Humans
Industry
Occupational Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Russia
Sex Factors
Urinary Bladder Neoplasms - epidemiology - etiology
Abstract
A cooperative study of urinary bladder cancer morbidity in Kuibyshev and Tambov Provinces was conducted. A higher morbidity level was established in the latter area. However, morbidity growth rate was higher both in the whole population and individual age and sex groups in Kuibyshev Province. The results suggest that epidemiologic studies of bladder neoplasia should be continued in said areas.
PubMed ID
2956765 View in PubMed
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79 records – page 1 of 8.