Skip header and navigation

Refine By

20 records – page 1 of 2.

The 2006 K/DOQI guidelines for peritoneal dialysis adequacy are not adequate.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature166065
Source
Blood Purif. 2007;25(1):103-5
Publication Type
Article
Date
2007
Author
James F Winchester
Nikolas Harbord
Patrick Audia
Alan Dubrow
Stephen Gruber
Donald Feinfeld
Richard Amerling
Author Affiliation
Division of Nephrology and Hypertension, Beth Israel Medical Center, 350 East 17th Street, New York, NY 10003, USA. jwinches@bethisraelny.org
Source
Blood Purif. 2007;25(1):103-5
Date
2007
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Body mass index
Canada
Humans
Metabolic Clearance Rate
Peritoneal Dialysis - methods - standards
Practice Guidelines as Topic - standards
Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
Reproducibility of Results
United States
Urea - metabolism
Abstract
The 2006 National Kidney Foundation K/DOQI guidelines have lowered the peritoneal dialysis adequacy standard of Kt/V(urea) from 2.1 to 1.7 in anuric patients, largely based on the patient survival results of 2 clinical trials in Mexico and Hong Kong. It is our contention that the guidelines may be misleading since they have chosen to ignore the bias in these trials and have ignored the adverse outcomes in control groups in the trials on which the guidelines are based, as well as the body size of the subjects in these trials. Body size has changed in the US and Canada over the last few decades and there are similar changes worldwide. We suggest that the minimum targets for peritoneal dialysis be reinstituted at the previous standard Kt/V(urea) of 2.0.
PubMed ID
17170545 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Carboxylation processes in cattle with different levels of productivity]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature66181
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1976 Jul-Aug;48(4):497-502
Publication Type
Article
Author
M F Gulyi
D A Mel'nichuk
V A Mal'ko
V G Kebko
A A Lushchik
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1976 Jul-Aug;48(4):497-502
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Body Weight
Carbon Dioxide - metabolism
Cattle - metabolism
Citrates - metabolism
English Abstract
Female
Lactation
Liver - metabolism
Male
Pregnancy
Proteins - metabolism
Species Specificity
Urea - metabolism
Abstract
The experiments were conducted on bulls-analogs of the black-piebald and Simmental breed which differ from each other in the intensity of live weight gain (18-31%) as well as on lactating cows-analogs of the black-piebald breed which differ in the level of milk productivity (41-80%). The intensity of the carboxylation processes (CO2 fixation) as well as of protein and lipids biosynthesis in the liver of the bulls from a heavy-producing group (the second group) is shown to be considerably higher than in the low-producing animals (the first group). In venous blood plasm of the second group bulls the content of urea and citrate was higher (by 29-141 and 33%, respectively) than in the first group animals. Blood plasma of the lactating cows from a heavy-producing group contains more urea (57-70%), citrate (146-80%) and total protein (10-14%) than that of animals with low milk productivity. Similar regularity is also observed as to the amount of urea and citrate of milk of cows with a higher milk productivity (by 40-50 and 51-53% higher respectively, than in the low-productive animals).
PubMed ID
988663 View in PubMed
Less detail

Comparison between amino acids and orotic acid analysis in the detection of urea cycle disorders in the Quebec Urinary Screening Program.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature243602
Source
Adv Exp Med Biol. 1982;153:321-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
1982

[Delayed evaluation of urea content in bioassays using a chemical stabilizer]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature33570
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1998 Jul-Aug;70(4):143-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
H M Iarmol'chuk
Author Affiliation
Bucovina State Medical Academy, Chernivtsi.
Source
Ukr Biokhim Zh. 1998 Jul-Aug;70(4):143-7
Language
Ukrainian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Animals
Biological Assay
Child
English Abstract
Evaluation Studies
Excipients - chemistry
Humans
Phenanthrenes - chemistry
Rats
Time Factors
Urea - metabolism
Abstract
We have studied 126 chemical compounds. Moreover 9-triphenylphosphoniomethyl-phenanthrene chloride has been found to stabilize bioassays and preserve their urea content unchanged for a period of 90-990 days. Due to its use a delayed technique of a quantitative assessment of urea in biological objects has been elaborated characterized by universal novelty. It may be used with the aim of studying metabolic processes in the cosmonauts' body, atomic submarine crews, members of polar, alpine, desert, underwater, space and other expeditions which cannot be accompanied by a biochemical laboratory.
PubMed ID
9848218 View in PubMed
Less detail

Diagnostic accuracy of tests for Helicobacter pylori in an Alaska Native population.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature128673
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2011 Nov 14;17(42):4682-8
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-14-2011
Author
Dana L Bruden
Michael G Bruce
Karen M Miernyk
Julie Morris
Debby Hurlburt
Thomas W Hennessy
Helen Peters
Frank Sacco
Alan J Parkinson
Brian J McMahon
Author Affiliation
Arctic Investigations Program, Division of Preparedness and Emerging Infections, National Center for Emerging Zoonoses and Infectious Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Anchorage, AK 99508, United States. dbruden@cdc.gov
Source
World J Gastroenterol. 2011 Nov 14;17(42):4682-8
Date
Nov-14-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Alaska - epidemiology
Antibodies, Bacterial - blood
Breath Tests - methods
Diagnostic Tests, Routine - standards
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal
Female
Helicobacter Infections - complications - diagnosis - epidemiology
Helicobacter pylori - immunology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Population Groups
Predictive value of tests
Sensitivity and specificity
Stomach Neoplasms - diagnosis - etiology
Urea - metabolism
Urease - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
To evaluate the accuracy of two non-invasive tests in a population of Alaska Native persons. High rates of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection, H. pylori treatment failure, and gastric cancer in this population necessitate documentation of infection status at multiple time points over a patient's life.
In 280 patients undergoing endoscopy, H. pylori was diagnosed by culture, histology, rapid urease test, (13)C urea breath test (UBT), and immunoglobulin G antibodies to H. pylori in serum. The performances of (13)C-UBT and antibody test were compared to a gold standard defined by a positive H. pylori test by culture or, in case of a negative culture result, by positive histology and a positive rapid urease test.
The sensitivity and specificity of the (13)C-UBT were 93% and 88%, respectively, relative to the gold standard. The antibody test had an equivalent sensitivity of 93% with a reduced specificity of 68%. The false positive results for the antibody test were associated with previous treatment for an H. pylori infection [relative risk (RR) = 2.8]. High levels of antibodies to H. pylori were associated with chronic gastritis and male gender, while high scores in the (13)C-UBT test were associated with older age and with the H. pylori bacteria load on histological examination (RR = 4.4).
The (13)C-UBT outperformed the antibody test for H. pylori and could be used when a non-invasive test is clinically necessary to document treatment outcome or when monitoring for reinfection.
Notes
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2009 Mar 1;199(5):652-6019125674
Cites: Can J Gastroenterol. 2006 Dec;20(12):775-817171196
Cites: Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2000 Nov;7(6):885-811063492
Cites: Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2002 Sep;9(5):1044-812204957
Cites: Ann Intern Med. 2003 Sep 16;139(6):463-913679322
Cites: J Clin Pathol. 1994 Mar;47(3):227-318163693
Cites: J Gastroenterol. 1995 Jun;30(3):295-3007647894
Cites: J Clin Gastroenterol. 1995;21 Suppl 1:S164-88775012
Cites: Am J Surg Pathol. 1996 Oct;20(10):1161-818827022
Cites: Endoscopy. 1997 Jan;29(1):27-309083733
Cites: Scand J Clin Lab Invest. 1998 Feb;58(1):19-279516653
Cites: Hepatogastroenterology. 1999 May-Jun;46(27):2057-6210430397
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2004 Nov 15;20(10):1001-1715569102
Cites: Helicobacter. 2005 Dec;10(6):615-916302988
Cites: J Infect Dis. 2006 Feb 15;193(4):537-4616425133
Cites: Gut. 2006 Apr;55(4):457-6216162678
Cites: Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2006 Apr 15;23(8):1215-2316611283
Cites: Clin Microbiol Rev. 2006 Jul;19(3):449-9016847081
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2007 Jan 15;44(2):e5-817173210
Cites: Clin Vaccine Immunol. 2007 Jan;14(1):85-617079433
Cites: World J Gastroenterol. 2007 Feb 14;13(6):925-917352025
Cites: Helicobacter. 2006 Dec;11(6):581-817083381
Cites: Alaska Med. 2006 Jul-Sep;48(2):30-5917140152
Cites: Clin Infect Dis. 2009 May 15;48(10):1385-9119368506
PubMed ID
22180710 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Dialysis treatment is satisfactory. A survey of all patients with chronic renal failure in Stockholm]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature35299
Source
Lakartidningen. 1995 May 31;92(22):2316-20
Publication Type
Article
Date
May-31-1995

Effects of insulin-like growth factor-I administration on in vivo regulation of urea synthesis in normal subjects and patients with cirrhosis.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature139635
Source
Liver Int. 2011 Jan;31(1):132-7
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-2011
Author
Thomas D Sandahl
Niels K Aagaard
Karen L Thomsen
Thorbjørn Grøfte
Jacob Greisen
Jens S Christiansen
Hendrik Vilstrup
Author Affiliation
Department of Medicine V, Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus, Denmark. thomas.damgaard.sandahl@ki.au.dk
Source
Liver Int. 2011 Jan;31(1):132-7
Date
Jan-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Alanine - administration & dosage
Cross-Over Studies
Denmark
Female
Glucagon - blood
Human Growth Hormone - blood
Humans
Infusions, Intravenous
Injections, Subcutaneous
Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins - blood
Insulin-Like Growth Factor I - administration & dosage
Liver - drug effects - metabolism
Liver Cirrhosis, Alcoholic - drug therapy - metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Placebo Effect
Time Factors
Treatment Outcome
Urea - metabolism
Abstract
The anabolic effects of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) may involve a decrease of hepatic nitrogen (N) clearance, but this has never been studied in humans. Patients with cirrhosis have low levels of IGF-I and might benefit from IGF-I therapy. Conversely, a possible decrease in hepatic N clearance by IGF-I could increase the risk of hepatic encephalopathy.
To examine the effects of 1-week IGF-I administration on the functional hepatic N clearance (FHNC), viz. the linear slope of the relationship between blood-a-amino-N concentration and urea-N synthesis rate as controlled by an infusion of alanine.
A randomized sequence-crossover placebo-controlled study. Eight healthy volunteers and eight patients with alcoholic cirrhosis received injections of saline or IGF-I twice daily (50 µg/kg) for 7 days.
IGF-I levels at baseline were lower in the patients than those in the controls. The IGF-I treatment normalized patient levels and caused an increase in the controls to supra-physiological levels. FHNC was lower in patients compared with healthy subjects (23.0 vs 36.5 L/h, P=0.03). IGF-I treatment reduced FHNC by 30% in healthy subjects (from 36.5 to 25.7 L/h, P = 0.02), whereas no effect was found in the patients.
IGF-I downregulates urea synthesis in normal subjects. This may be part of the explanation behind the anabolic effects of IGF-I. The normalization of IGF-I in cirrhosis patients without an effect on urea synthesis implies that the patients were resistant to IGF-I with regard to reduction of hepatic amino-N elimination. IGF-I treatment of cirrhosis patients evidently carries no risk of N accumulation.
PubMed ID
21040412 View in PubMed
Less detail

Hereditary urea cycle diseases in Finland.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature156229
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2008 Oct;97(10):1412-9
Publication Type
Article
Date
Oct-2008
Author
Päivi Keskinen
Anna Siitonen
Matti Salo
Author Affiliation
Department of Pediatrics, Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland. paivi.keskinen@uta.fi
Source
Acta Paediatr. 2008 Oct;97(10):1412-9
Date
Oct-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Amino Acid Metabolism, Inborn Errors - diagnosis - epidemiology - genetics - metabolism
Argininosuccinic Aciduria
Carbamoyl-Phosphate Synthase I Deficiency Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology
Child
Child, Preschool
Citrullinemia - diagnosis
Female
Finland - epidemiology
Humans
Hyperammonemia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Hyperargininemia - diagnosis - epidemiology
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Ornithine Carbamoyltransferase Deficiency Disease - diagnosis - epidemiology - metabolism
Urea - metabolism
Young Adult
Abstract
To estimate the incidence of urea cycle diseases (UCDs) in Finland and determine the course of the various disorders as well as the outcome.
The original data were collected in the years 1998-2001. The diagnoses made after 2001, as well as the current status of the patients, were updated by surveys in the spring of 2007.
We found a total of 55 cases of UCDs in Finland by 2007: 30 cases of ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency, 20 of argininosuccinate lyase (ASL) deficiency, 3 of carbamyl phosphate synthetase (CPS-I) deficiency, 1 of type 1 citrullinaemia and 1 of argininaemia. The estimated total incidence of UCDs was 1:39 000. The incidences of individual disorders were: OTC deficiency 1:62 000, ASL deficiency 1:144 000, CPS deficiency 1:539 000 and citrullinaemia 1:1 616 000. Eighteen (33%) of the patients with a diagnosis of UCD have died, most during their first hyperammonaemic crisis. One patient with OTC deficiency has had a liver transplant. Neurological symptoms of varying severity are common among these patients, particularly those with ASL deficiency.
The first survey on the incidence of UCDs in Finland shows some differences in the occurrence rates compared to other countries. Hyperammonaemia, and the neurological symptoms caused by it, can be avoided in most patients with late-onset UCDs with a standard treatment. However, in patients with ASL deficiency, the development of neurological symptoms seems to be inevitable in spite of careful treatment and avoidance of hyperammonaemia.
PubMed ID
18616627 View in PubMed
Less detail

The incident patient cohort study design with uncontrolled dose. Substantial over-estimation of mortality as a function of peritoneal dialysis dose?

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211136
Source
ASAIO J. 1996 Sep-Oct;42(5):M514-7
Publication Type
Article
Author
F A Gotch
D E Gentile
M L Keen
R. Amerling
V W Folkert
A S Kliger
W B Shapiro
Author Affiliation
Davies Medical Center, San Francisco, California, USA.
Source
ASAIO J. 1996 Sep-Oct;42(5):M514-7
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Analysis of Variance
Body Water - metabolism
Canada - epidemiology
Clinical Protocols
Cohort Studies
Humans
Kidney Failure, Chronic - mortality - physiopathology - therapy
Peritoneal dialysis
Peritoneal Dialysis, Continuous Ambulatory
Renal Dialysis
Risk factors
United States - epidemiology
Urea - metabolism
Abstract
In the Canada-USA (CANUSA) Study, the dialysis dose was neither randomized nor held constant, was measured at 6 month intervals, and the relative risk of mortality (R) was found to correlate linearly to mean values of weekly peritoneal plus renal urea clearance normalized to volume, (KprT/ V)m, ranging from 1.5 to 2.3. A risk/dose (R/D) function was derived for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis from kinetic criteria for dose equivalency in hemodialysis (HD) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) and the HD R/D function. This PD R/D function was nonlinear with breakpoint from steep to shallow slope at (KprT/V)ud = 2.00, where ud refers to uniform single doses in contrast to mean doses with wide variances on the mean. The predicted decrease in renal urea clearance KrT/V per 6 months of CANUSA follow-up was computed from serial measured KrT/V in the Randomized Dialysis Prescription and Clinical Outcomes Study and showed it to be 0.21 +/- 0.34. The CANUSA (KprT/V)m values were corrected for the distributed values of 3 months decrements in KrT/V, and the population mortality risk at each (KprT/V)m dose level reported in CANUSA was computed from summation of the product of the R/D curve and fractional distribution of (KprT/V)ud values. From these calculations, the authors conclude that maximum (KprT/V)ud level achieved in CANUSA was 2.00, and the study does not define R/D response above this level.
PubMed ID
8944932 View in PubMed
Less detail

20 records – page 1 of 2.