Skip header and navigation

Refine By

1415 records – page 1 of 142.

The 3 mm skin prick test (SPT) threshold criterion is not reliable for Tyrophagus putrescentiae: the re-evaluation of SPT criterion to dust mites.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature71486
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
B. Kanceljak-Macan
J. Macan
D. Plavec
T. Klepac
S. Milkovic-Kraus
Author Affiliation
Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Zagreb, Croatia.
Source
Allergy. 2002 Dec;57(12):1187-90
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Antibody Specificity - immunology
Comparative Study
Croatia
Cross Reactions - immunology
Dermatophagoides farinae - immunology
Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus - immunology
Female
Humans
Immunoglobulin E - blood - immunology
Male
Middle Aged
Proteins - immunology
Pyroglyphidae - immunology
Regression Analysis
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and specificity
Skin Tests - standards
Urban health
Abstract
BACKGROUND: The mean wheal diameter >/= 3 mm is the usual criterion for positive skin prick test (SPT) reaction to dust mites. The study assessed the accuracy of this SPT criterion with respect to specific IgE values of above 0.35 kUA/l (+ sIgE). METHODS: Specific IgE (ImmunoCAP, Pharmacia AB Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden) and standard SPT to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (DP) and farinae (DF), Lepidoglyphus destructor (LD) and Tyrophagus putrescentiae (TP) (ALK, Hørsholm, Denmark) were performed in a random sample of 457 subjects, of whom 273 men (mean age 35.3 +/- 11.0 years) and 184 women (mean age 37.9 +/- 9.5 years). Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test, regression analysis and discriminant analysis. RESULTS: When the mean wheal diameter of >/= 3 mm was considered positive (+ SPT), the correlation between + SPT and + sIgE was 0.47 for DP (P
PubMed ID
12464048 View in PubMed
Less detail

A 9-year longitudinal study of reported oral problems and dental and periodontal status in 70- and 79-year-old city cohorts in northern Sweden.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature62838
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):76-84
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1998
Author
G. Nordström
B. Bergman
K. Borg
H. Nilsson
A. Tillberg
J H Wenslöv
Author Affiliation
Department of Prosthetic Dentistry, Faculty of Odontology, Umeå University, Sweden.
Source
Acta Odontol Scand. 1998 Apr;56(2):76-84
Date
Apr-1998
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging
Cohort Studies
Dental Care for Aged - statistics & numerical data - utilization
Dental Caries - epidemiology
Dentures - statistics & numerical data
Female
Geriatric Assessment - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Insurance, Dental - utilization
Longitudinal Studies
Male
Mouth, Edentulous - epidemiology
Periodontal Attachment Loss - epidemiology
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Sampling Studies
Sweden - epidemiology
Tooth Loss - epidemiology
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
Before 1981 no representative studies of oral health in an elderly population in northern Sweden had been presented, and longitudinal studies of oral health in the aging person were in general rare. Thus the aim of this study was to investigate longitudinal changes in oral health in a representative sample of an elderly city population in northern Sweden. Reported oral problems and treatment needs were noted, and dental and periodontal status was registered in clinical examinations. The frequency of reported annual dental visits and of being called by the dentist increased in the younger but not in the older cohort during the 9-year period. In 1990 all the 79- and 88-year-olds with annual visits reported that they were recalled by the dentist. The clinical investigation showed an increasing amount of tooth loss, root caries, and periodontal disease with increasing age. Among dentulous persons 1.7 teeth per subject were lost from 1981 to 1990 in the younger cohort, compared with 2.6 teeth per subject in the older cohort. The number of sound teeth decreased very little in the younger cohort (from 3.44 to 3.34) but more evidently in the older cohort (from 3.47 to 2.65) during the 9-year period. The frequency of surfaces with attachment level > 3 mm increased statistically significantly from 1981 to 1990 in the older cohort. Subjects with annual visits had in general fewer oral problems.
PubMed ID
9669457 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A 40-year study of aortic and coronary artery atherosclerosis in male population of Yakutsk]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature76239
Source
Arkh Patol. 2006 Jan-Feb;68(1):6-10
Publication Type
Article
Author
O V Voronova
V S Zhdanov
V A Argunov
V P Alekseev
I E Galakhov
D V Iudakov
Source
Arkh Patol. 2006 Jan-Feb;68(1):6-10
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Aorta - pathology
Comparative Study
Coronary Arteriosclerosis - epidemiology - pathology
English Abstract
Health Transition
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Siberia
Urban Health - trends
Abstract
The trends in development of aortic and coronary atherosclerosis in healthy male population were studied by WHO methods in three trials: in 1963-1965, 1985-1987, 2001-2003. It was found that atherosclerosis and coronary arteries stenosis were less frequent in the native population of Yakutia than in migrants.
PubMed ID
16544527 View in PubMed
Less detail

Aboriginal urbanization and rights in Canada: examining implications for health.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature115712
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-2013
Author
Laura C Senese
Kathi Wilson
Author Affiliation
Department of Geography & Program in Planning, University of Toronto, 100 St. George Street, Room 5047, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G3, Canada. laura.senese@utoronto.ca
Source
Soc Sci Med. 2013 Aug;91:219-28
Date
Aug-2013
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adult
Attitude to Health - ethnology
Canada
Cultural Characteristics
Female
Health Status Disparities
Human Rights
Humans
Indians, North American - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Male
Middle Aged
Prejudice - ethnology
Qualitative Research
Urban Health - ethnology
Urbanization
Young Adult
Abstract
Urbanization among Indigenous peoples is growing globally. This has implications for the assertion of Indigenous rights in urban areas, as rights are largely tied to land bases that generally lie outside of urban areas. Through their impacts on the broader social determinants of health, the links between Indigenous rights and urbanization may be related to health. Focusing on a Canadian example, this study explores relationships between Indigenous rights and urbanization, and the ways in which they are implicated in the health of urban Indigenous peoples living in Toronto, Canada. In-depth interviews focused on conceptions of and access to Aboriginal rights in the city, and perceived links with health, were conduced with 36 Aboriginal people who had moved to Toronto from a rural/reserve area. Participants conceived of Aboriginal rights largely as the rights to specific services/benefits and to respect for Aboriginal cultures/identities. There was a widespread perception among participants that these rights are not respected in Canada, and that this is heightened when living in an urban area. Disrespect for Aboriginal rights was perceived to negatively impact health by way of social determinants of health (e.g., psychosocial health impacts of discrimination experienced in Toronto). The paper discusses the results in the context of policy implications and future areas of research.
PubMed ID
23474122 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absence of sex differences in pharmacotherapy for acute myocardial infarction.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature179138
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jul;20(9):899-905
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jul-2004
Author
Susan E Jelinski
William A Ghali
Gerry A Parsons
Colleen J Maxwell
Author Affiliation
Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
Source
Can J Cardiol. 2004 Jul;20(9):899-905
Date
Jul-2004
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists - therapeutic use
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Anticoagulants - therapeutic use
Aspirin - therapeutic use
Calcium Channel Blockers - therapeutic use
Canada - epidemiology
Cohort Studies
Drug Evaluation
Drug Therapy
Female
Fibrinolytic Agents - therapeutic use
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Myocardial Infarction - drug therapy
Patient Admission
Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors - therapeutic use
Sex Factors
Urban health
Abstract
Previous studies have indicated that sex differences may exist in the pharmacological management of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), with female patients being treated less aggressively.
To determine if previously reported sex differences in AMI medication use were also evident among all AMI patients treated at hospitals in an urban Canadian city.
All patients who had a primary discharge diagnosis of AMI from all three adult care hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, in the 1998/1999 fiscal year were identified from hospital administrative records (n=914). A standardized, detailed chart review was conducted. Information collected from the medical charts included sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, comorbid conditions, and cardiovascular medication use during hospitalization and at discharge.
Similar proportions of female and male patients were treated with thrombolytics, beta-blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, nitrate, heparin, diuretics and digoxin. Among patients aged 75 years and over, a smaller proportion of female patients received acetylsalicylic acid in hospital than did male patients (87% versus 95%; P=0.026). Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that, after correction for age, use of other anticoagulants/antiplatelets and death within 24 h of admission, sex was no longer an independent predictor for receipt of acetylsalicylic acid in hospital. Medications prescribed at discharge were similar between male and female patients.
The results from this Canadian chart review study, derived from detailed clinical data, indicate that the pattern of pharmacological treatment of female and male AMI patients during hospitalization and at discharge was very similar. No sex differences were evident in the treatment of AMI among patients treated in an urban Canadian centre.
PubMed ID
15266360 View in PubMed
Less detail

Absenteeism and respiratory disease among children and adults in Helsinki in relation to low-level air pollution and temperature.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature228944
Source
Environ Res. 1990 Jun;52(1):34-46
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-1990
Author
A. Pönkä
Author Affiliation
Helsinki City Health Department, Finland.
Source
Environ Res. 1990 Jun;52(1):34-46
Date
Jun-1990
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Absenteeism
Adult
Air Pollutants - adverse effects - analysis
Child
Child, Preschool
Cold Temperature
Epidemiologic Methods
Finland
Humans
Infant
Nitrogen Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Respiratory Tract Diseases - epidemiology - etiology
Sulfur Dioxide - adverse effects - analysis
Urban health
Abstract
The weekly changes in ambient sulfur dioxide, nitrogen dioxide, and temperature were compared with the figures for respiratory infection in children and adults and for absenteeism from day-care centers (DCC), schools, and workplaces during a 1-year period in Helsinki. The annual average level of sulfur dioxide was 21 micrograms/m3 and of nitrogen dioxide 47 micrograms/m3; the average temperature was +3.1 degrees C. The levels of these pollutants and the temperature were significantly correlated with the number of upper respiratory infections reported from health centers. Low temperature also correlated with increased frequency of acute tonsillitis, of lower respiratory tract infection among DCC children, and of absenteeism from day-care centers, schools and workplaces. Furthermore, a significant association was found between levels of sulfur dioxide and absenteeism. After statistical standardization for temperature, no other correlations were observed apart from that between high levels of sulfur dioxide and numbers of upper respiratory tract infections diagnosed at health centers (P = 0.04). When the concentrations of sulfur dioxide were above the mean, the frequency of the upper respiratory tract infections was 15% higher than that during the periods of low concentration. The relative importance of the effects of low-level air pollution and low temperature on health is difficult to assess.
PubMed ID
2351127 View in PubMed
Less detail

[A cardiovascular health promotion program for 9-12 year old children and the community of Saint-Louis du Parc/Quebec].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature202967
Source
Sante Publique. 1998 Dec;10(4):425-45
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-1998
Author
L. Renaud
J. O'Loughlin
G. Paradis
S. Chevalier
Author Affiliation
Régie régionale de Montréal-Centre, Québec.
Source
Sante Publique. 1998 Dec;10(4):425-45
Date
Dec-1998
Language
French
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cardiovascular Diseases - etiology - prevention & control
Child
Child Health Services - organization & administration
Community Health Services - organization & administration
Health Promotion - organization & administration
Humans
Organizational Objectives
Poverty
Program Evaluation
Quebec
Risk factors
Urban Health Services - organization & administration
Abstract
This article presents a programme for cardiovascular health for 9 to 12 years old children, called "Healthy Heart" Saint-Louis du Parc and carried out in low socioeconomic and multiethnic part of Montreal, Quebec, Canada. These five years programme targets were more both spheres: school and community (leisure centre, ethnocultural centre, groceries and other places). We develop the objectives, the conceptual models underlying to the programme, the perspective of work, the infrastructure of the programme: its staff and financing, the partnerships and the structure organising. Then we present the various interventions carried out along the period and so a description of many evaluations. At last, we discuss about the programme continuation.
PubMed ID
10065008 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to and use of physician resources by the rural and urban populations in Manitoba.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature211550
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):248-52
Publication Type
Article
Author
W K Fakhoury
L. Roos
Author Affiliation
Manitoba Centre for Health Policy and Evaluation (MCHPE), Saint Boniface General Hospital Research Centre, Winnipeg.
Source
Can J Public Health. 1996 Jul-Aug;87(4):248-52
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Health Manpower
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Manitoba
Medicine - statistics & numerical data
Middle Aged
Physicians - supply & distribution - utilization
Rural Health - statistics & numerical data
Specialization
Urban Health - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
This paper examines access to and use of the physician resources for ambulatory care by residents of Winnipeg and rural areas in Manitoba. Analyses were conducted on physician claims submitted to Manitoba Health in the fiscal years 1986-87 and 1991-92. The percentage of people who made contact with physicians, the number of visits per 100 residents, and the number of visits per user were used to asses changes between 1986 and 1991. There were important variations between residents of Winnipeg and the rural regions in access to and use of physicians' services across the years, and by physician specially. These variations accompanied a decrease in physician supply in the province.
PubMed ID
8870303 View in PubMed
Less detail

[Access to general practitioners in a county in Troms]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature70574
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Aug 25;125(16):2210-2
Publication Type
Article
Date
Aug-25-2005
Author
Anne Helen Hansen
Ivar J Aaraas
Jorun Støvne Pettersen
Gerd Ersdal
Author Affiliation
Tromsø kommune, Rådhuset, 9299 Tromsø. anne.helen.hansen@tromso.kommune.no
Source
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen. 2005 Aug 25;125(16):2210-2
Date
Aug-25-2005
Language
Norwegian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Comparative Study
Emergency Medical Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
English Abstract
Family Practice - standards - statistics & numerical data
Female
Health Services Accessibility - standards - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Interviews
Male
Norway
Physicians, Family
Physicians, Women
Referral and Consultation - standards - statistics & numerical data
Rural Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Telephone
Urban Health Services - standards - statistics & numerical data
Abstract
BACKGROUND: In 2002 the Norwegian Board of Health made a survey of the accessibility of general practitioners in Troms county in North Norway. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In a telephone interview one secretary in each surgery informed about telephone response time, planned time for telephone consultations, recorded numbers of urgent consultations, and waiting time to obtain a routine consultation. RESULTS: On average, the planned telephone time was two hours per week. Telephone time was in inverse proportion to the number of patients on the doctor's list. Rural doctors spent twice as much time as urban colleagues on the telephone with their patients. Doctors with lists between 500 and 1500 patients had a higher proportion of urgent consultations compared with doctors with shorter or longer lists. INTERPRETATION: Telephone response time below two minutes and waiting times for routine consultations below 20 days appear to be within acceptable norms. When patient lists are above 1500, doctors' capacity to offer telephone contact and emergency services to their patients seems reduced.
PubMed ID
16138139 View in PubMed
Less detail

Access to syringes in three Russian cities: implications for syringe distribution and coverage.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature158518
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Apr;19 Suppl 1:S25-36
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-2008
Author
Anya Sarang
Tim Rhodes
Lucy Platt
Author Affiliation
Russian Harm Reduction Network, Ilimskaya Street, 4-1-38, 127576 Moscow, Russia. anyasarang@gmail.com
Source
Int J Drug Policy. 2008 Apr;19 Suppl 1:S25-36
Date
Apr-2008
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Cost-Benefit Analysis
Data Collection
Female
HIV Infections - prevention & control - transmission
Health Services Accessibility - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Multivariate Analysis
Needle-Exchange Programs - economics - utilization
Pharmacies - organization & administration
Preventive Health Services - economics - organization & administration
Risk-Taking
Russia
Substance Abuse, Intravenous - complications
Syringes - supply & distribution
Urban Health Services - supply & distribution
Abstract
We report findings from a multi-method study investigating drug injectors' access to needles and syringes in three large Russian cities (Moscow, Volgograd, Barnaul).
We undertook 209 qualitative interviews among drug injectors, and supplemented these with baseline data from a community-recruited survey of 1473 drug injectors.
Almost all (93%; 1277) injectors used pharmacies as their main source of clean injecting equipment, and only 7% (105) reported ever having had contact with city syringe exchange projects. Good access to syringes has coincided with the expansion of private pharmacies. Key factors contributing to pharmacy access included: geographic proximity; low cost; and the restrictive policies of exchange instituted at local syringe exchanges. A fear of police interference surrounded the use of pharmacies and syringe exchanges, and fed a reluctance to carry used needles and syringes, which in turn acted as a disincentive to syringe exchange attendance. The perceived benefits of syringe exchanges over pharmacies included the additional health services on offer and the social support provided, but these benefits were over-shadowed by disadvantages. Multivariable analyses of survey data in two cities show no differences on account of risk behaviour among injectors sourcing equipment from pharmacies compared to syringe exchanges.
HIV prevention coverage indicators need to include measures of pharmacy-based syringe distribution and not only measures of syringe exchange coverage. There is an urgent need to pilot pharmacy-based distribution and exchange projects in Russia as well as other forms of secondary syringe distribution. Alongside expanding the reach of dedicated syringe exchange projects, pharmacy-based syringe distribution, and exchange, may help improve coverage of cost effective HIV prevention measures targeting drug injectors.
PubMed ID
18313910 View in PubMed
Less detail

1415 records – page 1 of 142.