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1414 records – page 1 of 142.

[Economic evaluation of aerogenic carcinogenic risk in the population of an industrial town].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature187389
Source
Gig Sanit. 2002 Sep-Oct;(5):80-1
Publication Type
Article

The feasibility and acceptability of introducing brief intervention for alcohol misuse in an urban aboriginal medical service.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature186974
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2002 Dec;21(4):375-80
Publication Type
Article
Date
Dec-2002
Author
Maggie Brady
Beverly Sibthorpe
Ross Bailie
Sandy Ball
Polly Sumnerdodd
Author Affiliation
Centre for Aboriginal Economic Policy Research, Australian National University, Canberra ACT, Australia.
Source
Drug Alcohol Rev. 2002 Dec;21(4):375-80
Date
Dec-2002
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Alcoholism - epidemiology - prevention & control - psychology
Behavior
Health Personnel - psychology - statistics & numerical data
Humans
Oceanic ancestry group - psychology
Pilot Projects
Urban health
Urban Health Services
Abstract
We report on the feasibility and perceived acceptability of brief motivational interviewing for hazardous alcohol use in an urban Aboriginal health service. General practitioners (GPs) were trained in brief motivational interviewing, and health workers in other aspects of the intervention. Screening was initially carried out using the AUDIT, but subsequently reduced to two simple questions. Information was obtained through a combination of participant observation by the study team, ongoing ad hoc review and feedback from staff, periodic group meetings, and one-on-one interviews with health workers and GPs. The AUDIT was felt to be intrusive and some questions were poorly understood. Brief intervention seemed to be culturally appropriate, but barriers to wider administration included lack of time and the complexity of patients' presenting health problems. As a result of the research there was an increase in general awareness and acceptability of addressing alcohol issues at the health service. This study raises a number of issues that both support and threaten the wide implementation of brief intervention in urban Aboriginal primary care settings.
PubMed ID
12537708 View in PubMed
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Public health planning in the City of Toronto--Part 2. Turning concepts into programs.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237041
Source
Can J Public Health. 1986 May-Jun;77(3):185-9
Publication Type
Article
Author
D. Baxter
Source
Can J Public Health. 1986 May-Jun;77(3):185-9
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health planning
Humans
Ontario
Public Health
Urban health
PubMed ID
3742401 View in PubMed
Less detail

Public health planning in the City of Toronto--Part 1. Conceptual planning.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature237042
Source
Can J Public Health. 1986 May-Jun;77(3):180-4
Publication Type
Article
Author
T. Hancock
Source
Can J Public Health. 1986 May-Jun;77(3):180-4
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Health planning
Humans
Ontario
Public Health
Urban health
PubMed ID
3742400 View in PubMed
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"A good spot": Health promotion discourse, healthy cities and heterogeneity in contemporary Denmark.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature90819
Source
Health Place. 2009 Jun;15(2):606-13
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jun-2009
Author
Larsen Eva Ladekjaer
Manderson Lenore
Author Affiliation
Unit for Health Promotion Research, University of Southern Denmark, Niels Bohrs Vej 9, 6700 Esbjerg, Denmark. elarsen@health.sdu.dk
Source
Health Place. 2009 Jun;15(2):606-13
Date
Jun-2009
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Cities
Denmark
Health Promotion - methods
Humans
Urban health
Abstract
Health promotion at a community level has gained popularity in recent decades within and outside academic environments. The health promotion discourse is part of a wider political discourse, aimed at empowering individuals to take control of their own lives and enabling them to be engaged, responsible and active citizens in their own communities. Key values of the discourse, deriving from a democratic and individualistic culture, are evident in how local authorities develop and implement policies aimed at promoting population health and wellbeing. In this article, we draw on data from a relatively poor multicultural Danish community incorporated in the WHO Healthy Cities Programme. We explore how key terms of the health promoting discourse are constructed, operationalized and resisted by different subgroups. The contradictions that emerge challenge how we comprehend communities in relation to safety and harmony, and how people within defined communities are involved in common community life.
PubMed ID
19083259 View in PubMed
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[Effect of a complex of environmental factors on the morbidity of the population]

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature49429
Source
Gig Sanit. 1979 Apr;(4):7-11
Publication Type
Article
Date
Apr-1979
Author
Ia I Zviniatskovskii
Source
Gig Sanit. 1979 Apr;(4):7-11
Date
Apr-1979
Language
Russian
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
English Abstract
Environmental health
Humans
Morbidity
Ukraine
Urban health
PubMed ID
428756 View in PubMed
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[More responsibility to the municipalities when it comes to health care].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature181567
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Jan 12;166(3):182; author reply 182
Publication Type
Article
Date
Jan-12-2004
Author
Ejgil W Rasmussen
Source
Ugeskr Laeger. 2004 Jan 12;166(3):182; author reply 182
Date
Jan-12-2004
Language
Danish
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Denmark
Health Policy
Humans
Social Responsibility
Urban Health Services
PubMed ID
14870655 View in PubMed
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[Organization of the substitute therapy service for patients with end-stage chronic renal failure in Moscow].

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature207056
Source
Probl Sotsialnoi Gig Istor Med. 1997 Sep-Oct;(5):21-4
Publication Type
Article

Public policy analysis to redress urban environmental health inequities.

https://arctichealth.org/en/permalink/ahliterature125940
Source
Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2011 Nov;12(4):245-53
Publication Type
Article
Date
Nov-2011
Author
Andrea Chircop
Author Affiliation
Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada. Andrea.chircop@dal.ca
Source
Policy Polit Nurs Pract. 2011 Nov;12(4):245-53
Date
Nov-2011
Language
English
Publication Type
Article
Keywords
Adolescent
Adult
Canada
Child Day Care Centers - supply & distribution
Child Health Services
Child, Preschool
Health Policy
Health Status Disparities
Humans
Infant
Poverty
Urban health
Urban Health Services
Young Adult
Abstract
Public policies may not have been designed to disadvantage certain populations, but the effects of some policies create unintended health inequities. The nature of community health nurses' daily work provides a privileged position to witness the lived experiences and effects of policy-produced social and health inequities. This privileged position requires policy competence including analytical skills to connect lived experiences to public policy. The purpose of this article is to present an example of an urban ethnography that explicates inequity-producing effects of public policy and is intended to inform necessary policy changes. This study sheds light on how issues of childcare, housing, nutrition, and urban infrastructure in the context of poverty are fundamental to the larger issues of environmental health. This policy analysis documents how the Day Care Act of Nova Scotia, Canada explicates patriarchal and neoliberal gender and class assumptions that have implications for mothers' health decisions.
PubMed ID
22438161 View in PubMed
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1414 records – page 1 of 142.